Bethany, OK, United States
Bethany, OK, United States

Southern Nazarene University is a Christian liberal arts college located in Bethany, Oklahoma, United States. Wikipedia.


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News Article | November 19, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource site AffordableCollegesOnline.org has released its list of the Best Online Accelerated Nursing Degrees & Programs in the nation for 2016-2017. Using a variety of cost and educational outcome data to compare accredited programs side by side, the list rates the University of Saint Mary, University of Wyoming, The Sage Colleges, University of Indianapolis and Samford University as the top-scoring schools for accelerated nursing students. "As the demand for qualified nurses grows, more colleges are implementing fast-track education options for nursing students,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "These programs are rigorous, but the schools on our list stand out for providing the best quality education and support to help students comprehend quickly and ultimately start their careers in nursing sooner.” AffordableCollegesOnline.org required schools to meet several basic requirements to be considered for the Best Online Accelerated Nursing Degrees & Programs list. Each college must be accredited by the Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) or Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) and be a public or private not-for-profit institution to be included. They must also offer students job placement and academic counseling services to qualify. Individual school scores are then determined by weighing a variety of qualitative and quantitative data points, such as nursing certification pass rates, tuition costs and more. The Top 50 list of schools, as well as specific details on data and methodology used to determine ranking and scoring can be found at the link below: An alphabetical list of schools on the Best Online Accelerated Nursing Programs list for 2016-2017: Adelphi University Albany State University Ball State University Barry University Baylor University Clemson University Creighton University DeSales University Drexel University Duquesne University East Carolina University Georgia Southwestern State University Indiana Wesleyan University Jacksonville University Lewis University Loyola University Chicago Lynchburg College New Mexico State University - Main Campus New York University Northern Arizona University Ohio University - Main Campus Olivet Nazarene University Quinnipiac University Robert Morris University Rutgers University - Newark Saint Xavier University Samford University Seton Hall University Shenandoah University Simmons College Southern Nazarene University Texas Christian University The College of Saint Scholastica The Sage Colleges University of Alabama at Birmingham University of Arizona University of Delaware University of Hawaii at Manoa University of Indianapolis University of Memphis University of Miami University of North Florida University of Northern Colorado University of Saint Joseph University of Saint Mary University of Wyoming Utica College Valparaiso University West Virginia University Wilkes University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | November 12, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Best Online Colleges in Oklahoma for 2016-2017 school year have been named by leading online higher education resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org. Of 32 schools noted for overall affordability and online program quality, Oral Roberts University, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Northeastern State University, Oklahoma Wesleyan University and Northwestern Oklahoma State University earned the highest marks for four-year schools while Tulsa Community College, Western Oklahoma State College, Rose State College, Northern Oklahoma College and Carl Albert State College earned the highest marks for two-year schools. "Projections show that by 2020, 67 percent of job vacancies in Oklahoma will require a college degree or some form of post-secondary education or training,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "We’re aiming the spotlight on schools in the state who are putting emphasis on giving students more flexible learning options. These Oklahoma colleges are being commended for providing the highest quality, most affordable online education programs in the state.” There are several minimum requirements schools in Oklahoma must meet to be considered for the Best Online Colleges list. Only colleges and universities that hold accreditation and are registered as public or private not-for-profit entities are eligible. To help measure cost and affordability, each must also offer in-state tuition at or below set maximums of $5,000 annually for two-year schools and $25,000 annually for four-year schools to qualify. All eligible schools are then scored based on analysis of more than a dozen unique statistics, including variety of online programs, financial aid offerings and more. To learn more about the methodology and data used to determine AffordableCollegesOnline.org’s Best Online Colleges in Oklahoma and to find where each qualifying school ranks, visit the link below: A complete list of Oklahoma’s Best Two-Year Online Colleges for 2016-2017: A complete list of Oklahoma’s Best Four-Year Online Colleges for 2016-2017: Cameron University Langston University Mid-America Christian University Northeastern State University Northwestern Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Baptist University Oklahoma Christian University Oklahoma Panhandle State University Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology Oklahoma State University - Main Campus Oklahoma Wesleyan University Oral Roberts University Randall University Rogers State University Southeastern Oklahoma State University Southern Nazarene University Southwestern Christian University Southwestern Oklahoma State University University of Oklahoma - Health Sciences Center University of Oklahoma - Norman Campus AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


Neuenschwander D.E.,Southern Nazarene University
American Journal of Physics | Year: 2014

This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature, suitable for use in the undergraduate physics curriculum, on Noether's Theorem, which relates conservation laws to symmetries. © 2014 American Association of Physics Teachers.


Eskridge B.E.,Southern Nazarene University | Valle E.,Southern Nazarene University | Schlupp I.,University of Oklahoma
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Large scale coordination without dominant, consistent leadership is frequent in nature. How individuals emerge from within the group as leaders, however transitory this position may be, has become an increasingly common question asked. This question is further complicated by the fact that inmany of these aggregations, differences between individuals are minor and the group is largely considered to be homogeneous. In the simulations presented here, we investigate the emergence of leadership in the extreme situation in which all individuals are initially identical. Using a mathematical model developed using observations of natural systems, we show that the addition of a simple concept of leadership tendencies which is inspired by observations of natural systems and is affected by experience can produce distinct leaders and followers using a nonlinear feedback loop. Most importantly, our results show that small differences in experience can promote the rapid emergence of stable roles for leaders and followers. Our findings have implications for our understanding of adaptive behaviors in initially homogeneous groups, the role experience can play in shaping leadership tendencies, and the use of self-assessment in adapting behavior and, ultimately, self-role-assignment. Copyright: © 2015 Eskridge et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Dallen L.,Southern Nazarene University | Neuenschwander D.E.,Southern Nazarene University
American Journal of Physics | Year: 2011

We use a Lagrangian that yields the equation of motion for particle dynamics in a rotating reference frame to obtain the corresponding conservation laws through Noether's theorem, which relates continuous symmetries to conservation laws. We derive the symmetries by invoking Noether's theorem definition of invariance and solving the resulting set of coupled equations for generators of the transformations. The results illustrate, in a seldom-used context, the unifying power of Noether's theorem. © 2011 American Association of Physics Teachers.


Eskridge B.E.,Southern Nazarene University | Eskridge B.E.,University of Oklahoma | Hougen D.F.,University of Oklahoma
Robotics and Autonomous Systems | Year: 2010

We propose an extended version of adaptive fuzzy behavior hierarchies, termed Multiple Composite Levels (MCL), that allows for the proper modulation of composite behaviors over multiple levels of a behavior hierarchy, and demonstrate its effectiveness for a hybrid learning/reactive control system. Controllers using adaptive fuzzy behavior hierarchies have previously been shown to provide effective control for robots tasked with multiple concurrent tasks. However, when more complex hierarchies are used to provide control for tasks of increasing complexity, low-level reactive behaviors may not be properly weighted, resulting in sub-optimal control. Through experimental evaluation in which composite behaviors that coordinate lower behaviors are learned using reinforcement learning, we demonstrate that MCL provides effective control in a complex multi-agent task, whereas the original implementation of adaptive fuzzy behavior hierarchies does not. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Crofford J.,Southern Nazarene University
Proceedings of the 12th Annual Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference, GECCO '10 - Companion Publication | Year: 2010

A method for identifying values for a genetic algorithm's probability of crossover, mutation rate, and selection pressure that promote the evolution of better results in fewer generations has recently been proposed. This approach, termed the Triple Parameter Hypothesis (TPH), derives these values from schema theory. However, the experiments previously used to test the hypothesis used schema distances that were the extreme ends of the spectrum. In the work presented here, we evaluate the parameters predicted by the hypothesis in a series of maintenance scheduling experiments which use schema distances in between these extremes. Results show that evolutionary runs which use parameters that satisfy the hypothesis statistically significantly outperform runs that use parameters that do not satisfy the hypothesis. © 2010 ACM.


Neuenschwander D.E.,Southern Nazarene University
International Journal of Modern Physics A | Year: 2014

For twenty years the students in my Science, Technology, and Society course, where we use Disturbing the Universe as a textbook, have corresponded with Professor Dyson. That someone of Professor Dyson's standing consistently makes a priority of promptly answering the letters of undergraduate students from all academic majors, and does so with grace and kindness, insight and wisdom, offers a personal glimpse into his character and integrity. On behalf of my students, and as a way of publicly thanking Professor Dyson for participating in our course conversations, I am honored to share samples of our correspondence with him over the years, including student reflections on his involvement in their education. © 2014 World Scientific Publishing Company.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ROBUST INTELLIGENCE | Award Amount: 192.56K | Year: 2016

The ability to use teams of robots in real-world tasks, such as exploration, reconnaissance and search and rescue, depends on their ability to effectively cooperate in complex and dynamic environments. Unfortunately, determining the most effective team size for a given task depends on a variety of factors, often requires information not readily available, and can be computationally impractical. Observations from nature show that some animal societies exhibit frequent splits (fission) and merges (fusion) of subgroups without the coordination overhead frequently found in multi-robot systems. The goal of this research project is to use these insights from fission-fusion societies in nature as inspiration to implement similar behavior in multi-robot systems.

This project will investigate the motivations and mechanisms that contribute to the fission of a team of robots into smaller groups and the fusion of smaller groups into a larger group, into sizes appropriate to a given task. Potential biological and environmental factors that contribute to individual decisions that result in the fission and fusion of groups and that have artificial analogues relevant to multi-robot systems will be identified using agent-based simulations. An emphasis will be placed on factors that contribute to an adaptive task-specific preferred group size. Once identified, these factors will be implemented on physical robots to evaluate the performance of the decision-making system within the constraints of physical robots. The decision-making system used will be implemented using an adaptive fuzzy behavior hierarchy and a collective decision-making model developed using observations of natural systems.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 159.55K | Year: 2011

The ability to use teams of robots in interesting, real-world tasks such as exploration, reconnaissance, and search and rescue depends on their ability to effectively cooperate in complex and dynamic environments. Observations from nature and personal experience show that leadership can have a significant positive impact in the coordination and performance of a team. However, current processes for selecting leaders in teams of robots are either unable to adapt to changes to team membership or require significant time and effort to do so. In contrast, research in the biological sciences has shown that systems with leaders that emerge by way of internal motivation, and not external communication, are able to adapt to changes in team membership in complex and dynamic environments. In these systems, leaders are thought of more as initiators of action rather than managers that direct other individuals.

In this project, the researchers will use these insights into biological systems to investigate the motivations and mechanisms that contribute to the emergence of not only a single leader, but to the emergence of a hierarchy of leaders in a team of robots. Potential motivations and mechanisms will be evaluated in simulations of common team-based robot tasks that require cooperation and coordination of the individual robots. An understanding of the emergence process will enable roboticists to use teams of robots in tasks for which their use is currently impractical. Furthermore, this project will also increase the body of knowledge in the life sciences by providing a theoretical foundation on which further biological experiments can be based. The combination of these contributions is transformative not only for the practical impact it will have on the ability to design multi-robot systems that benefit from improved coordination and cooperation, but also for its impact on our fundamental understanding of what facilitates the emergence of organized leadership structures.

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