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Robertson S.A.,Coventry University | Jeevaratnam J.A.,Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust | Agrawal A.,Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust | Cutress R.I.,University of Southampton | Cutress R.I.,Southampton General Hospital Southampton
Breast Cancer: Targets and Therapy | Year: 2017

Introduction: Mastectomy skin flap necrosis (MSFN) has a reported incidence of 5%–30% in the literature. It is often a significant and underappreciated problem. The aim of this article was to review the associated challenges and possible solutions. Methods: A MEDLINE search was performed using the search term “mastectomy skin flap necrosis”. Titles and abstracts from peer-reviewed publications were screened for relevance. Results: MSFN is a common complication and may present as partial- or full-thickness necrosis. Predictive patient risk factors include smoking, diabetes, obesity, radiotherapy, previous scars and severe medical comorbidity. MSFN leads to a number of challenges, including wound management problems, delays to adjuvant therapy, esthetic compromise, implant extrusion, patient distress and financial loss. Careful preoperative planning and meticulous surgical technique may reduce the incidence of MSFN. A number of intraoperative techniques are available to try and predict skin flaps at risk of MSFN. MSFN may be managed operatively or nonoperatively. Early intervention may reduce the morbidity of MSFN in selected cases. Topical nitroglycerin ointment may be beneficial in reducing MSFN following immediate reconstruction, but the evidence base is still limited. Conclusion: MSFN can result in considerable challenges for the patient and the health care service. This review discusses the management options for this problem. © 2017 Robertson et al.


PubMed | University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Pharmaceutical Commissioning, Southampton General Hospital Southampton and General Finance
Type: | Journal: Journal of Crohn's & colitis | Year: 2017

Biosimilar infliximab CT-P13 offers the potential for large drug acquisition cost savings. However, there are limited published data regarding its efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity in inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], particularly in switching IBD patients from originator to biosimilar infliximab. We present the outcomes of a service evaluation of switching IBD patients established on originator infliximab to biosimilar, using a managed switching programme funded via a gain share agreement in a UK teaching hospital.Evaluation outcomes included drug persistence, changes in drug acquisition costs, patient-reported side effects, adverse events, patient outcomes assessed using the IBD-control Patient-Reported Outcome Measures [PROM] questionnaire, serum drug and antibody levels, and routinely collected biochemical markers.A total of 143 patients with IBD [118 Crohns disease, 23 ulcerative colitis, 2 IBD unclassified] were switched from originator infliximab to CT-P13. Patients reported a similar incidence of side effects before and after switch. No clinically significant differences were observed in mean C-reactive protein [CRP], albumin, haemoglobin levels, or platelet and white cell counts after the switch to CT-P13, whereas mean IBD-control-8 score improved from 10.4 to 11.2 [p = 0.041]. There was no significant difference in drug persistence between biosimilar and originator infliximab [p = 0.94] and no increase in immunogenicity was found. Drug acquisition costs decreased by 40,000-60,000 per month.A managed switching programme from originator infliximab to biosimilar CT-P13 in IBD, using a gain-share agreement, delivers significant cost savings and investment in clinical services while maintaining similar patient-reported outcomes, biochemical response, drug persistence, and adverse event profile.

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