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South Shields, United Kingdom

Woodward M.D.,Newcastle University | Landamore M.J.,Newcastle University | Rees G.,UK Maritime Pilots Association | Allen N.,UK Maritime Pilots Association | And 8 more authors.
Transactions of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects Part A: International Journal of Maritime Engineering | Year: 2015

From the thrusters on smaller, but numerous, harbour support vessels through to the pod-drives on cruise ships and ocean going liners, azimuth control has rapidly established itself in the maritime industry. From the design of the ship, to the training of personnel and the development of operational procedures, the industry has risen to meet the demand. However, this rapid evolution has not allowed sufficient time for the propagation of knowledge throughout the different disciplines. On a day-to-day basis, maritime pilots must deal with such ships, coping as they do, with an as yet unstandardized environment. This paper presents the findings of an EU project (AZTPILOT) considering accidents and incidents and concerning the training and operational practice of ships equipped with Azimuth Control Devices (ACD's). © 2015: The Royal Institution of Naval Architects. Source


Short S.,South Tyneside College
Marine Navigation and Safety of Sea Transportation: Advances in Marine Navigation | Year: 2013

The objective of this document is to compiling into a form that is readily exploitable for use in maritime pilot training and the wider maritime industry. Specifically, the STCW95 (Standards for Training, Certification and Watch-keeping) code regulates the required competences for all ships operators. According to the STCW95 code, ship masters and chief officers functioning at management level on-board ships more than 500 GT shall possess very specific competences including "be able to respond to navigational emergencies" and "manoeuvre and handle a ship in all conditions". The document will compile outcomes into a form that may be used to propose a specialised training module dedicated to the operation of ship equipped with azimuthing control devices. It is expected that the document should result in a deliverable that outlines the necessary information to deliver such a course. Or, where insufficient information is available, identifies such knowledge-gaps and propose roots to address them. © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group. Source


Bhatia P.S.,South Tyneside College | Bhatia P.S.,Northumbria University
Proceedings of the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology Part A: Journal of Marine Engineering and Technology | Year: 2011

Fixing heavy machinery such as Companders (compressor and expander arrangement) on modern LNG carriers requires careful examination of holding-down arrangements. Currently there are no specific rules regarding this, and the methods for estimating accelerations differ widely between Classification societies and the International Gas Code (IGC). In highlighting the need for a detailed review of holding-down arrangements, a comparison of methods of acceleration calculations is made. A new method was found using kinematics of rigid bodies and its impact on the location of equipment is analysed. Source


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SST-2007-4.1-02 | Award Amount: 1.34M | Year: 2008

The aim is to improve by policy and design, the safety and security of ships by taking into account the man-machine interface and the training of maritime pilots; specifically when operating ships equipped with azimuthing control devices. From the thrusters on smaller, but numerous, harbour support vessels through to the pod-drives on cruise ships and ocean going liners, azimuthing control has rapidly established itself in the maritime industry. But while the industry has risen to meet the demand, this rapid evolution has not allowed sufficient time for the propagation of knowledge throughout the different disciplines. Though the various sectors of the industry each have their own expertise, a lack of communication is both restricting progress and compromising safety and security; in addition, much work is being repeated unnecessarily. To address this problem, the project will provide a forum for technical review and cross-disciplinary discussion between the key industry sectors; specifically: - The specialist in HYDRODYNAMIC MODELLING and testing, both theoretical and experimental, and expert in the understanding of azimuthing control and propulsion devices. - The designers and manufacturers of MARINE SIMULATION software, hardware and physical models that are used for the training of marine pilots. Including, the designers, human factors specialists and manufactures of automation and control systems, joystick systems and graphical user interfaces. -The MARITIME TRAINING facilities using both numerical and physical simulation tool and specialist in the theory and practice of human factors (physical and behavioural components) and specialist in the training of bridge-crews and pilots. - Practitioners in OPERATIONAL PRACTICE including maritime pilots, ship operators/managers, pilot association and end users. And including, Maritime Authorities and Regulators specifically interested in policy and regulation.

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