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Middlesbrough, United Kingdom

Bateman S.D.,South Tees NHS Hospitals Foundation Trust
British Journal of Community Nursing | Year: 2015

Aim: This evaluation aimed to determine whether the use of a haemoglobin spray solution expedited sloughy wound healing. Method: A descriptive evaluation was undertaken within a community setting exploring 25 patients presenting with sloughy healing and non-healing wounds, and the effects of 8 topically administered haemoglobin treatments over a 4-week period. Standard wound cleansing and dressing management were continued, with no changes to pre-evaluation regimens, and care being provided by the patients themselves or by a carer. Data were collected weekly with regard to primary outcomes of slough reduction, wound surface area reduction, patient ease of use (self-care), and overall product experience. Results: At 4 weeks, all wounds demonstrated positive measured endpoints of slough elimination and continued wound-size reduction. Patients and carers found the product easy to use (self-caring) with an overall positive wound care experience. Conclusion: The administration of a haemoglobin spray solution on patients presenting with sloughy wounds resulted in positive healing outcomes of slough elimination and wound reduction alongside positive self-care and product satisfaction. Continued evaluation is recommended to build upon the evidence of this form of treatment. © 2015 MA Healthcare Ltd. Source


Bateman S.D.,South Tees NHS Hospitals Foundation Trust
Wounds UK | Year: 2013

Surgical site infections (SSIs) pose wound management challenges to both the clinician and patient. An evaluation of three patients following surgical intervention with static wounds was conducted to explore the benefits of adding an antimicrobial primary wound contact layer in conjunction with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). All three patients demonstrated positive outcomes regarding atraumatic wound-bed protection, reducing bacterial burden, and "rebooting" of the wound healing process. The author recommends further research on the use of NPWT and antimicrobial primary wound contact layers for the management of SSIs be undertaken. Source


Atkin L.,University of Huddersfield | Stephenson J.,University of Huddersfield | Bateman S.D.,South Tees NHS Hospitals Foundation Trust
Wounds UK | Year: 2015

Posnett and Franks (2008) have calculated that 200,000 people in the UK have a chronic wound, with an estimated treatment cost of between £2.3 billion and £3.1 billion per year. With an ever-increasing ageing population, it can be assumed that costs associated with the management and treatment of wounds will also continue to rise. The Business Service Authority (2014) reported that in 2013 between £160 and £185 million was spent on wound care dressings within primary care services in England, of which foam dressings accounted for £22.6 million of the overall spend. Foam dressings are frequently used in wound care to assist with the management of wound exudate, helping to prevent maceration of the wound bed, protect the surrounding skin and prevent cross-infection caused by strikethrough. The aim of dressings is to provide an optimum environment at the interface with the wound bed to promote wound healing. With limited financial resources within health care, the cost-effectiveness of each type of wound dressing is high on the agenda. It is, however, important that costs are not considered in isolation; the outcomes (general health benefits) associated with interventions (e.g. wound healing and reduction in wound pain) must also be taken into account alongside close collaboration with the patient, and in some cases the carer (Rippon et al, 2008). This article provides a summary of the published literature relating to foam dressings, investigating their impact on healing rates, pain on dressing removal, fluid-handling capacity and their cost-effectiveness. It focuses on the independent assessment of the fluid-handling capacity of eight commonly-prescribed foam dressings: four bordered (Cutimed® Siltec B, Mepilex® Border, Allevyn® Life and Tegaderm™ foam adhesive) and four non-bordered (Cutimed® Siltec/Cutimed® SiltecPLUS, Mepilex®, Allevyn® Non-Adhesive, and Tegaderm™ foam). Source


Bateman S.D.,South Tees NHS Hospitals Foundation Trust
Wounds UK | Year: 2013

Skin integrity, its assessment, management and prevention of deterioration is the responsibility of all healthcare workers. Maintenance of good skin integrity is everyone's business and we need to regroup and refocus if harm to patients' skin integrity is to be avoided (Bateman, 2013). This article will focus on the prevention of pressure ulcers within the seated patient, specifically in the lower extremities, highlighting the need to explore innovative ways of managing this patient group, and asking if we can adopt theatre surfaces in the patient journey. Source


Bateman S.D.,South Tees NHS Hospitals Foundation Trust
Wounds UK | Year: 2013

On 19 March 2013, Wounds UK held a Made Easy event at the Palace Hotel, Manchester, aimed at furthering the knowledge of tissue viability specialists, district nurses, link nurses, nursing home nurses, podiatrists, practice, and staff nurses in eliminating avoidable pressure ulcers. The event was chaired by Kath Vowden (Nurse Consultant, Acute and Chronic Wounds, Bradford Royal Infirmary) and Jacqui Fletcher (Ambition Lead, NHS Midlands and East). Source

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