South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Psychiatry

United Kingdom

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Psychiatry

United Kingdom
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Lourdusamy A.,South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Psychiatry | Newhouse S.,South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Psychiatry | Lunnon K.,South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Psychiatry | Proitsi P.,King's College London | And 13 more authors.
Human Molecular Genetics | Year: 2012

Proteins are central to almost all cellular processes, and dysregulation of expression and function is associated with a range of disorders. A number of studies in human have recently shown that genetic factors significantly contribute gene expression variation. In contrast, very little is known about the genetic basis of variation in protein abundance in man. Here, we assayed the abundance levels of proteins in plasma from 96 elderly Europeans using a new aptamer-based proteomic technology and performed genome-wide local (cis-) regulatory association analysis to identify protein quantitative trait loci (pQTL). We detected robust cis-associations for 60 proteins at a false discovery rate of 5%. The most highly significant single nucleotide polymorphism detected was rs7021589 (false discovery rate, 2.5 × 10-12), mapped within the gene coding sequence of Tenascin C (TNC). Importantly, we identified evidence of cis-regulatory variation for 20 previously disease-associated genes encoding protein, including variants with strong evidence of disease association show significant association with protein abundance levels. These results demonstrate that common genetic variants contribute to the differences in protein abundance levels in human plasma. Identification of pQTLs will significantly enhance our ability to discover and comprehend the biological and functional consequences of loci identified from genome-wide association study of complex traits. This is the first large-scale genetic association study of proteins in plasma measured using a novel, highly multiplexed slow off-rate modified aptamer (SOMAmer) proteomic platform. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.


PubMed | South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Psychiatry
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Criminal behaviour and mental health : CBMH | Year: 2010

There is worldwide evidence of high rates of mental disorder among prisoners, with significant co-morbidity. In England and Wales, mental health services have been introduced from the National Health Service to meet the need, but prison health-care wings have hardly been evaluated.To conduct a service evaluation of the health-care wing of a busy London remand (pre-trial) prison and examine the prevalence and range of mental health problems, including previously unrecognised psychosis.Service-use data were collected from prison medical records over a 20-week period in 2006-2007, and basic descriptive statistics were generated.Eighty-eight prisoners were admitted (4.4 per week). Most suffered from psychosis, a third of whom were not previously known to services. Eleven men were so ill that they required emergency compulsory treatment in the prison under Common Law before hospital transfer could take place. Over a quarter of the men required hospital transfer. Problem behaviours while on the prison health-care wing were common.Prison health-care wings operate front-line mental illness triaging and recognition functions and also provide care for complex individuals who display behavioural disturbance. Services are not equivalent to those in hospitals, nor the community, but instead reflect the needs of the prison in which they are situated. There is a recognised failure to divert at earlier points in the criminal justice pathway, which may be a consequence of national failure to fund services properly. Hospital treatment is often delayed.


PubMed | South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Psychiatry
Type: Journal Article | Journal: British journal of community nursing | Year: 2014

Alcohol misuse in older people is a growing problem for health and social care providers, but remains largely hidden from public view and therefore largely overlooked by commissioners. Many older people with alcohol misuse have a dual diagnosis (alcohol misuse accompanying other mental disorders) rather than alcohol misuse alone, which requires specialist nursing expertise. Over the past 10 years, assessment of and interventions for the detection of alcohol misuse in older people have been developed within one London borough. This article details the background, strategy and outcomes of this service, which provides integrated care in a multi-disciplinary community mental health team covering an inner-city area with a high prevalence of alcohol misuse and dual diagnosis in older people.

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