South East Water

Frankston, Australia

South East Water

Frankston, Australia
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Shahsavari E.,RMIT University | Schmidt J.,ALS Water | Aburto-Medina A.,RMIT University | Khallaf B.,RMIT University | And 4 more authors.
MethodsX | Year: 2017

Soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) pose a significant public health problem, infecting approximately 2 billion people globally. Despite relatively low prevalence in developed countries, the removal of STHs from wastewater remains crucial to allow the safe use of biosolids or recycled water for agriculture. Wastewater helminth egg count data can contribute to an assessment of the need for, or success of, a parasite management program. Although the World Health Organisation (WHO) has recommended a standard method for counting helminth eggs in raw sewage based on the method of Bailenger (Ayres et al., 1996), the method generally results in low percentage egg recoveries. Given the importance of determining the presence of STHs, it is essential to develop novel techniques that optimise the recovery rate of eggs from raw sewage. In the present study: • The method described by Bowman et al. (2003) was optimized for the concentration and enumeration of helminth eggs in raw sewage from municipal sewage treatment plants.• The method is simple and reproducible and recovers a greater percentage of helminth eggs compared to the WHO method. © 2017 The Authors


Dow N.,Victoria University of Melbourne | Roehr J.,Victoria University of Melbourne | Murphy D.,Melbourne Water | Solomon L.,Melbourne Water | And 10 more authors.
Water Practice and Technology | Year: 2015

Combining ceramic membranes with ozonation and allowing ozone residual to contact the membrane surface is well known to control fouling, allowing for higher membrane fluxes. This means that the more robust, longer lasting and higher integrity ceramic material can potentially be used in water recycling in a cost competitive way. This paper presents additional results from a previously reported ozonation/ceramic membrane trial in Melbourne, Australia. The results assisted in understanding the cause of the high fluxes by quenching the residual ozone upstream of the membrane, to isolate its effects on organic species from those on the membrane. Ozone quenching was directly attributed to lost membrane performance which confirmed that ozone has a direct effect on the membrane which contributes to the higher fluxes. Tests to reduce cleaning chemical use (sodium hypochlorite) at high fluxes were also conducted. Sodium hypochlorite consumption generally was not significant, but trading better stability and higher fluxes for reduced chemical use needs to be justified. Ceramic membranes coupled with pre-ozonation exhibit unique properties in water treatment, offering potential advantages such as increased backwash disinfection, as well as higher flux rates or reduced chemical consumption. © IWA Publishing 2015.


Surapaneni A.,South East Water | Smith D.,South East Water | Stevens D.,Atura Pty Ltd. | Wilkinson K.G.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Darvodelsky P.,Pollution Solutions and Designs Pty Ltd.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2014

There is currently very limited use of biosolids in Australian horticulture, though it is more widely used in the cropping, cattle grazing, sheep grazing and fodder industries. We review the international scientific literature which documents potential productivity increases from the horticultural use of biosolids and a range of improvements to soil physical, chemical and biological conditions. A significant body of research has also addressed metal bioavailability, food quality, and environment impacts. Despite these findings, the stigma attached to the use of biosolids in food production is probably the main barrier to the beneficial use of biosolids in horticulture today. Greater utilization of biosolids is also not helped by the lack of regulation governing the land application of other organic wastes like poultry litter. In the US there have been no known negative human health impacts documented when biosolids meet US federal regulations and have been applied to land under best management practices. With the right quality control systems in place, assured product quality and the prospect of a revision of metal guidelines as a result of recent Australian research, biosolids could become an attractive alternative fertilizer and organic amendment for use in Australian horticulture.


SMi Group release new interview with Innovation Manager of Sutton and East Surrey Water, Jeremy Heath, ahead of his talk at the 6th Annual Smart Water Systems this April. London, United Kingdom, February 15, 2017 --( At the conference, Jeremy will discuss the smart network developments by giving an update on data collection, processing, display and mobilisation. With over 20 years of experience in the Water Industry, and a background in both mechanical engineering and database applications, Jeremy is responsible for the management of innovation within SESW. This involves both the development of an innovation culture and the introduction of new technologies into the Water Industry, in particular the Smart Water Network. This innovative network will be built on enhanced sensors, a communication layer, intelligent processing, intuitive graphical displays and workforce mobilisation. In the run up to the conference, SMi spoke to Jeremy about his work and data communications. How would you define the smart water industry from your view? "We’re still finding our way a bit. The technologies involved are really new and stitching them all together into a workable solution is a real task. It takes a challenging combination of IT, communication systems, network knowledge, data analysis and presentation solutions, and many of these are at the cutting/bleeding edge. However, there is real enthusiasm for a working solution and we are seeing some really great trials." How does Sutton & East Surrey Water prevent DRIP? "A lot of it is about data ownership. Ensure that staff make good use of the data and feel a sense of responsibility for making sure it is correct. The other key point is to process and disseminate the data as near to real time as possible. When data is trustworthy, accurate and timely, it is an invaluable tool." What improvements does the smart water industry need? "Discussions with our customers to develop the most effective use cases for the smart networks. There is a danger that we carry out this work simply because the opportunity is there, but these networks must drive both increased network knowledge and customer satisfaction." The full interview is available to read in the event download centre at http://www.smart-water-systems.com/prcom. Notable presenters at the conference include: Thames Water, Scottish Government, WaterSmart Software, United Utilities, Veolia, Northumbrian Water, Severn Trent, Southern Water, Energy Saving Trust, Irish Water, University of Exeter. Latest registered attendees for the event include: Anglian Water, Jersey Water, Thames Water, Bristol Water, South East Water, South Staffs Water, Scottish Water, Oxera, Kamstrup, Wheatley Associates Ltd, VCS Denmark, De Watergroep, RWE and Sensus UK Systems Ltd. For an example of who you could meet, please download the past attendee list from our website. For those looking to attend, there is a £100 early bird saving available online ending on 28th February 2017. SMi’s 6th annual conference: Smart Water Systems 24th - 25th April 2017 Copthorne Tara Hotel, London UK http://www.smart-water-systems.com/prcom Contact Information: Media: contact Theresa Chung on +44 (0)20 7827 6068 or email tchung@smi-online.co.uk Delegate Registration: contact Andrew Gibbons on Tel: +44 (0)20 7827 6156 / Email: agibbons@smi-online.co.uk About SMi Group Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk London, United Kingdom, February 15, 2017 --( PR.com )-- SMi Group have released an interview with Jeremy Heath, Innovation Manager at Sutton and East Surrey Water, ahead of his talk at the 6th annual Smart Water Systems conference in London on 24 and 25th April 2017.At the conference, Jeremy will discuss the smart network developments by giving an update on data collection, processing, display and mobilisation.With over 20 years of experience in the Water Industry, and a background in both mechanical engineering and database applications, Jeremy is responsible for the management of innovation within SESW. This involves both the development of an innovation culture and the introduction of new technologies into the Water Industry, in particular the Smart Water Network. This innovative network will be built on enhanced sensors, a communication layer, intelligent processing, intuitive graphical displays and workforce mobilisation.In the run up to the conference, SMi spoke to Jeremy about his work and data communications.How would you define the smart water industry from your view?"We’re still finding our way a bit. The technologies involved are really new and stitching them all together into a workable solution is a real task. It takes a challenging combination of IT, communication systems, network knowledge, data analysis and presentation solutions, and many of these are at the cutting/bleeding edge. However, there is real enthusiasm for a working solution and we are seeing some really great trials."How does Sutton & East Surrey Water prevent DRIP?"A lot of it is about data ownership. Ensure that staff make good use of the data and feel a sense of responsibility for making sure it is correct. The other key point is to process and disseminate the data as near to real time as possible. When data is trustworthy, accurate and timely, it is an invaluable tool."What improvements does the smart water industry need?"Discussions with our customers to develop the most effective use cases for the smart networks. There is a danger that we carry out this work simply because the opportunity is there, but these networks must drive both increased network knowledge and customer satisfaction."The full interview is available to read in the event download centre at http://www.smart-water-systems.com/prcom.Notable presenters at the conference include: Thames Water, Scottish Government, WaterSmart Software, United Utilities, Veolia, Northumbrian Water, Severn Trent, Southern Water, Energy Saving Trust, Irish Water, University of Exeter.Latest registered attendees for the event include: Anglian Water, Jersey Water, Thames Water, Bristol Water, South East Water, South Staffs Water, Scottish Water, Oxera, Kamstrup, Wheatley Associates Ltd, VCS Denmark, De Watergroep, RWE and Sensus UK Systems Ltd. For an example of who you could meet, please download the past attendee list from our website.For those looking to attend, there is a £100 early bird saving available online ending on 28th February 2017.SMi’s 6th annual conference:Smart Water Systems24th - 25th April 2017Copthorne Tara Hotel, London UKhttp://www.smart-water-systems.com/prcomContact Information:Media: contact Theresa Chung on +44 (0)20 7827 6068 or email tchung@smi-online.co.ukDelegate Registration: contact Andrew Gibbons on Tel: +44 (0)20 7827 6156 / Email: agibbons@smi-online.co.ukAbout SMi GroupEstablished since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from SMi Group


Wijesekara H.,University of New South Wales | Bolan N.S.,University of New South Wales | Vithanage M.,Sri Lanka Institute of Fundamental Studies | Xu Y.,University of South Australia | And 9 more authors.
Advances in Agronomy | Year: 2016

Globally, around 0.4×106 km2 area of land is estimated to be disturbed by mining activities, thereby contributing to severe environmental consequences including the generation of large amounts of mine spoils. The shortfall in topsoil due to poor striping practices and low levels of organic matter have been identified as common problems in rehabilitation of mining spoil. High heavy metal concentrations in mine spoil can adversely impact microbial activity and subsequent revegetation succession. The release of acids associated with mine spoils (ie, acid mine drainage through oxidation of pyrite) can also create adverse effects on the surrounding vegetation.Large quantities of biowaste, such as manure compost, biosolids, and municipal solid waste (MSW) that are low in contaminants [including metal(loid)s] can be used to rehabilitate mine spoils. These biowastes provide a source of nutrients and improve the fertility of spoils. These biowastes also act as a sink for metal(loid)s in mine tailings reducing their bioavailability through adsorption, complexation, reduction, and volatilization of metal(loid)s.This review provides an overview of the sources of biowastes and the current regulations for utilization; describes their benefits in terms of improving the physical, chemical, and biological properties of mine spoils; and elaborates on the role of the utilization of biowastes on mine spoil rehabilitation through several case studies. Finally, future research needs and strategies are identified in terms of sustainable biowaste utilization in mine spoil rehabilitation. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


Rajendram W.,Western Water | Surapaneni A.,South East Water
Water | Year: 2010

This paper examines the outcomes of a study which tracked the impact of biosolids application on soil, plant and feed (silage/hay/grain). Whilst such studies have been mainly limited to experimental plots in the past, an attempt was made to undertake the study under a "real farm management regime".Biosolids were applied at the rate of 98 dry tonnes/ha to cover around 7.9 ha of farm land. A 5 m buffer was observed which was used as a "control study" area. Triticale was planted in both biosolids treated and control areas. Soil, herbage and grain samples were analysed and results from the analyses suggest that: Contaminant build up in the soil due to iosolids application was negligible; Nutrient (P and K) build up in the soil due to biosolids application was significant; Nutrient (N, P, K and S) build up in the herbage due to biosolids application was significant; Concentrations of most metals in the herbage in the biosolids treated areas appeared to be considerably lower than that grown in the "control study" area. The results provide increased confidence to the end-user of the benefits of biosolids application.


Dassanayake K.B.,University of Melbourne | Jayasinghe G.Y.,University of Melbourne | Jayasinghe G.Y.,Ruhuna University | Surapaneni A.,South East Water | Hetherington C.,Transpacific Industries Group Ltd
Waste Management | Year: 2015

Alum salts are commonly used in the water industry to promote coagulation in the production of clean drinking water, which results in the generation and accumulation of 'waste' by-product 'alum sludge' in large volumes. Effective and efficient management of alum sludge in an economically and environmentally sustainable manner remains a significant social and environmental concern with ever increasing demand for potable water as a result of rapidly escalating world population and urban expansion. Various intensive practices have been employed to reuse the alum sludge in an attempt to figure out how to fill the gap between successful drinking water treatment process and environmentally friendly alum sludge management for over the years. This paper primarily aimed at comprehensive review of the existing literature on alum sludge characteristics, its environmental concerns and their potential utilization, especially in agricultural and horticultural sectors leading to update our recent state of knowledge and formulate a compendium of present and past developments. Different types of alum sludge utilizations in various fields were recognized and examined. The strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and potential risks of alum sludge reuse options with particular reference to agriculture were highlighted and knowledge gaps were identified. Research priorities and future challenges that will support in the development of effective alum. sludge. management practices in agriculture with multi-prong strategies were discussed. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Ruhuna University, Transpacific Industries Group Ltd, University of Melbourne and South East Water
Type: | Journal: Waste management (New York, N.Y.) | Year: 2015

Alum salts are commonly used in the water industry to promote coagulation in the production of clean drinking water, which results in the generation and accumulation of waste by-product alum sludge in large volumes. Effective and efficient management of alum sludge in an economically and environmentally sustainable manner remains a significant social and environmental concern with ever increasing demand for potable water as a result of rapidly escalating world population and urban expansion. Various intensive practices have been employed to reuse the alum sludge in an attempt to figure out how to fill the gap between successful drinking water treatment process and environmentally friendly alum sludge management for over the years. This paper primarily aimed at comprehensive review of the existing literature on alum sludge characteristics, its environmental concerns and their potential utilization, especially in agricultural and horticultural sectors leading to update our recent state of knowledge and formulate a compendium of present and past developments. Different types of alum sludge utilizations in various fields were recognized and examined. The strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and potential risks of alum sludge reuse options with particular reference to agriculture were highlighted and knowledge gaps were identified. Research priorities and future challenges that will support in the development of effective alumsludgemanagement practices in agriculture with multi-prong strategies were discussed.


Thangarajan R.,University of South Australia | Thangarajan R.,Cooperative Research Center for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment | Bolan N.S.,University of South Australia | Bolan N.S.,Cooperative Research Center for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment | And 3 more authors.
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2015

The effects of temperature (18, 24, and 37 °C) and form of nitrogen (N) input from various sources (organic—green waste compost, biosolids, and chicken manure; inorganic—urea) on N transformation in three different Australian soils with varying pH (4.30, 7.09, and 9.15) were examined. Ammonification rate (ammonium concentration) increased with increase in temperature in all soil types. The effect of temperature on nitrification rate (nitrate concentration) followed 24 > 37 > 18 °C. Nitrification rate was higher in neutral and alkaline soils than acidic soil. Mineral N (bioavailable N) concentration was high in urea treatments than in organic N source treatments in all soil types. Acidic soil lacked nitrification activity resulting in low nitrate (NO3) buildup in urea treatment, whereas a significant NO3 buildup was noticed in green waste compost treatment. In neutral and alkaline soils, the nitrification activity was low at 37 °C in urea treatment but with a significant NO3 buildup in organic amendment added soils. Addition of organic N sources supplied ammonia oxidizing bacteria thereby triggering nitrification in the soils (even at 37 °C). This study posits the following implications: (1) inorganic fertilizer accumulate high NO3 content in soils in a short period of incubation, thereby becoming a potential source of NO3 leaching; (2) organic N sources can serve as possible source of nitrifying bacteria, thereby increasing bioavailable N (NO3) in soils regardless of the soil properties and temperature. © 2013, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Baird J.K.,University of Alabama in Huntsville | McFeeters R.L.,University of Alabama in Huntsville | Caraballo K.G.,South East Water
International Journal of Thermophysics | Year: 2014

The biological function of a protein is intimately related to its three-dimensional molecular structure. Although X-ray diffraction from single crystals can be employed to solve for the molecular structure, use of this method is often impeded by the slow rate of precipitation of crystals from the pH buffered, aqueous solutions of strong electrolytes which ordinarily serve as growth media. The rate of crystallization can be measured as a function of growth solution conditions by growing the crystals in a dilatometer. As the crystallization progresses, the rate of change of the system volume caused by the difference in density between the crystals and the solution is reflected in the rate of change of the height of the fluid in the capillary side arm of the dilatometer. In the case of the proteins, lysozyme, and canavalin, this height changes exponentially with time, which serves to define a first-order rate constant or specific crystallization rate, k. A dozen such experiments may be needed to determine how k depends upon pH, electrolyte concentration, and temperature. Each experiment can require 4 or 5 days to reach equilibrium. If height measurements are made equally spaced in time, however, early time data can be combined according to the Guggenheim procedure, and the value of k can be determined without the experiment having to reach equilibrium. By using this method, the time required to complete an experiment can be reduced by as much as 50 %. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

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