Guangdong Entomological Institute and South China Institute of Endangered Animals

Guangzhou, China

Guangdong Entomological Institute and South China Institute of Endangered Animals

Guangzhou, China
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Pan H.,Central South University of forestry and Technology | Pan H.,Guangdong Entomological Institute and South China Institute of Endangered Animals | Chettri B.,Sikkim University | Yang D.,Central South University of forestry and Technology | And 4 more authors.
Asian Herpetological Research | Year: 2013

A new species of the genus Protobothrops Hoge & Romano-Hoge, 1983, was described from Jilong County, southern Tibet, China, and Chungthang, northern Sikkim, India. It differs from congeners by the following characters: 1) relatively large body size (total length up to 1510 mm); 2) dorsal scale rows 25-25-19; 3) except for the smooth outermost row, dorsal scales are weakly keeled; 4) relatively high number of ventral (198-216) and subcaudal (65-76 pairs) scales; 5) 7-8 supralabials; 6) 11 to 13 infralabials; 7) dorsal head uniform dark brown, laterally a reddish-brown obscure postocular streak; 8) dorsum of trunk and tail olive, with distinct black edged red brown transverse bands across the body and tail; and 9) eye from bright brown and reddish brown to mildly brown. The new species was also observed from the Haa Valley in western Bhutan.


Yuan L.,CAS South China Sea Institute of Oceanology | Yuan L.,Guangdong Entomological Institute and South China Institute of Endangered Animals | Hu C.,CAS South China Sea Institute of Oceanology | Zhang L.,CAS South China Sea Institute of Oceanology | Xia J.,CAS South China Sea Institute of Oceanology
Conservation Genetics | Year: 2013

Stichopus monotuberculatus is a valuable tropical sea cucumber that is distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific Ocean, including Guangxi, Hainan Land and Xisha Islands of China. Increasing demand and over-fishing, however, have seriously depleted the wild populations of this species in China. In this study, we applied both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers to characterize the population genetic subdivisions and phylogeographic histories of S. monotuberculatus sampled from Southern China. Based on both classes of molecular markers, our results demonstrated significant genetic structure among S. monotuberculatus populations, and revealed that the three populations (Q, S and B) experienced demographic expansion during the late Pleistocene (50,000-190,000 years BP). This study provides the basic information on natural population structure of S. monotuberculatus that may help to preserve and manage tropical sea cucumbers in China. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Liu C.,Zhejiang University | Ding Z.F.,Guangdong Entomological Institute and South China Institute of Endangered Animals | Ding P.,Zhejiang University
Shengtai Xuebao/ Acta Ecologica Sinica | Year: 2015

Habitat loss and fragmentation seriously threaten global species diversity. Understanding the impact on species and communities is a core issue for ecology and conservation biology. A guild acts as a functional unit within a community. Bird guild research can help to analyze relationships among different species and evaluate their responses to habitat fragmentation. Much research has focused on bird guilds in terrestrial fragments, while other fragmented systems, such as land-bridge islands, draw relatively less attention. Because different systems tend to display different geological and ecological patterns, we needed to verify whether terrestrial fragments and land-bridge islands share common patterns of response to habitat fragmentation. The land-bridge islands in the Thousand Island Lake, which were created by dam construction, are an ideal platform for the study of habitat fragmentation. To test bird sensitivity to habitat fragmentation across seasons, we conducted bird guild studies on 41 land-bridge islands in the Thousand Island Lake during the breeding season (April-June) and winter season (November-January) of each year between April 2009, and January 2012. We classified birds into guilds according to dietary type, foraging strata, and migratory status. We used an equation with logarithmic transformation from island biogeography, S=CAz, to clarify the relationship between bird guild species richness and island fragment area. In this equation, S represents species richness of each bird guild, A represents island area, C is a constant, and z is the slope of the species-area curve. This variable can be considered a measurement of sensitivity to habitat fragmentation. The bigger the value of z, the greater the sensitivity of the bird guild. We extracted and compared the slope of each species-area relationship curve (z value) to determine whether there exists significant variation in sensitivity to habitat fragmentation among the different bird guilds. Our research indicated that omnivorous birds were more sensitive to habitat fragmentation than insectivores during the winter season, while no significant difference was found for the breeding season. Understory birds were more sensitive to habitat fragmentation than canopy birds, both in breeding and winter seasons. Resident birds were more sensitive than migrants in winter, while no significant difference between them were observed in the breeding season. Both omnivorous and resident birds showed seasonal changes in their sensitivity to fragmentation. Other guilds, including insectivorous birds, canopy birds, understory birds, and migratory birds, showed no significant seasonal changes. Previous studies conducted in terrestrial fragments support our findings that responses of bird guilds to habitat fragmentation differ and that seasonal changes in the responses to habitat fragmentation do exist. These results may aid in the effective management of bird habitats and in the design of nature reserves. Future studies may focus on other bird guild types and determine if differences in responses to habitat fragmentation occur at a larger temporal scale. © 2015 Ecological Society of China. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Guangdong Entomological Institute and South China Institute of Endangered Animals
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Mitochondrial DNA | Year: 2015

Protobothrops cornutus is the endangered snake which is distributed narrowly in southern China and other adjacent countries of Asia. We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of P. cornutus (HB-pc20090810). The circle genome with the 17,219 bp total length contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 control regions. Overall base composition of the complete mtDNA was 33.18% A, 24.80% T, 29.43% C and 12.58% G. All the genes in P. cornutus were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand.

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