Charleston, United States

The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources is a South Carolina state agency charged with regulating hunting, fishing, boating, duck stamp orders, state parks, and the conservation efforts of the South Carolina state government.It is directed by seven-member Board of Directors. The governor of South Carolina appoints a member from each of the state's congressional districts, in addition to one at-large board member. The board or governor may appoint citizen's advisory panels to provide recommendations on agency programs.The Department of Natural Resources also oversees the state's soil and water conservation districts, which are special-purpose districts contiguous with each of South Carolina's 46 counties. Each conservation district is managed by six-member boards. Three members of each board are appointed through the Department of Natural Resources, while the other half are directly elected. Wikipedia.


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News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Three sea turtles, including two accidentally hooked by local fishermen, are set to return to the wild today. Oyster, Serp and Ray will be released at 2:30 p.m. at the Folly Beach County Park on Folly Beach. The release is being held in partnership with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) and the Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission (CCPRC). Attendees should plan to carpool, arrive early, and expect to pay for parking at the county park. This release brings the total number of sea turtles treated and released by the South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Care Center to 205, there are currently seven patients still receiving care. About the sea turtles: Oyster and Serp: Oyster and Serp, both juvenile Kemp’s ridley sea turtles, the most endangered of the species, were both accidentally caught by fisherman on Hilton Head Island and Edisto Island respectively. Luckily in both cases the fishermen knew to not cut the fishing line, and called SCDNR. The turtles were transported to the Aquarium’s Sea Turtle Hospital where the hooks were successfully removed. Supplemental treatment for the turtles included vitamins, antibiotics, pain medication and a healthy diet. After speedy recoveries, both turtles are ready to return to the ocean. Ray: Ray, a juvenile loggerhead sea turtle was brought to the Aquarium in May after being stung by a stingray in the Charleston Harbor. Upon admission to the Aquarium, Ray’s neck wound was flushed and treated with antibiotic and silver ointments. Ray then received vitamins, fluids, antibiotics and pain medication. A few days after admission, the barb was surgically removed from Ray’s neck. After six months of care, Ray received a clean bill of health. What can you do? You can help protect threatened and endangered sea turtles. If you find a sick or injured sea turtle, contact the SCDNR sea turtle hotline at (800) 922-5431. You may also help care for sea turtles in recovery in the South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Care Center™ by making a donation at scaquarium.org. Your donation will not only support the care of these turtles, but will also help fund Zucker Family Sea Turtle Recovery™, enabling the Aquarium to treat even more sea turtle patients. Slated to open May 2017, Zucker Family Sea Turtle Recovery™ will serve as a living, interactive learning landscape. It will present the remarkable journey from rescue, to rehabilitation, to release that each of our patients experience, establishing the Aquarium as a powerful educational presenter of sea turtle conservation on the East Coast. To read about our patients or track their recovery progress, visit our Sea Turtle Care Center™ blog at scaquarium.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for the latest updates from the hospital, including public sea turtle release details. More on the sea turtle release: For all media inquiries, please contact Kate Dittloff at (843) 579-8660 or kdittloff(at)scaquarium(dot)org. About the South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Care Center™: In partnership with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), the South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Care Center™ works to rescue, rehabilitate and release sea turtles that strand along the South Carolina coast. Located in the Aquarium, the Sea Turtle Hospital admits 25 to 35 sea turtles each year. Many of these animals are in critical condition and some are too sick to save. According to SCDNR, during the past 10 years the average number of sea turtle standings on South Carolina beaches each year is 127. Of these, roughly 10 percent are alive and successfully transported to the Sea Turtle Hospital. To date, the South Carolina Aquarium has successfully rehabilitated and released 205 sea turtles and is currently treating 7 patients. The average cost for each patient’s treatment is $50 per day with the average length of stay of nine months. About the South Carolina Aquarium: The South Carolina Aquarium features thousands of amazing aquatic animals from river otters and sharks to loggerhead turtles in more than 60 exhibits representing the rich biodiversity of South Carolina from the mountains to the sea. Dedicated to promoting education and conservation, the Aquarium also presents fabulous views of the Charleston Harbor and interactive exhibits and programs for visitors of all ages. The South Carolina Aquarium is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (last ticket sold at 4 p.m.) The Aquarium is closed Thanksgiving Day, half day Dec. 24 (open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.) and Dec. 25. Admission prices are: Toddlers (2 and under) free; Youth (3-12) $17.95; Adults (13+) $24.95. For more information, call (843) 577-FISH (3474) or visit scaquarium.org.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new analysis of population trends among coastal sharks of the southeast U.S. shows that all but one of the seven species studied are increasing in abundance. The gains follow enactment of fishing regulations in the early 1990s after decades of declining shark numbers. Scientists estimate that over-fishing of sharks along the southeast U.S. coast--which began in earnest following the release of Jaws in 1975 and continued through the 1980s--had reduced populations by 60-99% compared to un-fished levels. In response, NOAA's National Marine Fishery Service in 1993 enacted a management plan for shark fisheries that limited both commercial and recreational landings. Now, says lead scientist Cassidy Peterson, a graduate student at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science, "We've shown that after over two decades of management measures, coastal shark populations are finally starting to recover and reclaim their position as top predators, or regulators of their ecosystem. Our research suggests we can begin to shift away from the era of 'doom and gloom' regarding shark status in the United States." Joining Peterson in the study, published in the latest issue of Fish and Fisheries, were VIMS professor Rob Latour, Carolyn Belcher of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Dana Bethea and William Driggers III of NOAA's Southeast Fisheries Science Center, and Bryan Frazier of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The researchers say their study--based on modeling of combined data from six different scientific surveys conducted along the US East Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico between 1975 and 2014--provides a more accurate and optimistic outlook than previous studies based on commercial fishery landings or surveys in a single location. "Data from shark long-lining operations or shark bycatch can be suspect," says Peterson, "because what looks like a change in abundance might instead be due to changes in fishing gear, target species, market forces, or other factors." Research surveys are scientifically designed to remove these biases. Survey crews purposefully sample a random grid rather than visiting known shark hot spots, and strive to use the exact same gear and methods year after year to ensure consistency in their results. But even with these safeguards, data from a single survey often aren't enough to capture population trends for an entire shark species, whose members may occupy diverse habitats and migrate to different and far-flung areas depending on age and sex. "Because many shark species undergo vast migrations and have complex life cycles," says Peterson, "it's not uncommon for results from different surveys to conflict. Producing an estimate of total abundance requires combining data from different surveys--sometimes from several states or even countries--and applying intricate stock-assessment models." For the current study, the scientists combined data from six different shark surveys: the VIMS Longline Survey, the SouthEast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program's South Atlantic Coastal Trawl Survey, the South Carolina Coastal Longline Survey, the Georgia Red Drum Longline Survey, the Southeast Fisheries Science Center's Longline Survey, and the Gulf of Mexico Shark Pupping and Nursery Area Gillnet Survey. "Our study represents the most comprehensive analysis of patterns in abundance ever conducted for shark species common to our area and the Southeast coast," says Latour, who directs the longline survey at VIMS. Established in 1973, it is the world's longest running fishery independent monitoring program for sharks, skates, and rays. By pooling and modeling data from all six surveys, the researchers were able to estimate population trends for seven of the region's most common coastal species: the large-bodied sandbar, blacktip, spinner, and tiger sharks, and the smaller Atlantic sharpnose, blacknose, and bonnethead sharks. The results of the analysis were clear, says Peterson. "All the large-bodied sharks showed similar population trends, with decreasing abundance from the mid-1970s to the early 1990s, then a multi-year period of low abundance, and recent indications of recovery from past exploitation." All but one population of small coastal sharks also increased in abundance. The exception was blacknose sharks in the Gulf of Mexico, which decreased from the onset of records in 1989 until the study's end in 2014. This species is known to be susceptible to by-catch within the trawl fishery for Gulf shrimp. The blacknose population along the Atlantic coast of the southeast U.S. actually increased during the same period. The overall population trends make biological sense, says Latour. "The large-bodied species saw the greatest initial declines, both because they were highly sought by anglers, and because they mature late and produce relatively few pups. Their slow growth rate also helps explain the pause in their recovery following the onset of fishing regulations in the early 1990s." The smaller shark species, whose higher growth rates make them less susceptible to fishing pressure, saw lesser declines and more rapid recoveries. The team also found a correlation between shark numbers and both fishing pressure and large-scale climatic patterns. Funding for the study was provided by NOAA Fisheries, the NMFS Highly Migratory Species Office, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, the South Carolina Saltwater Recreational Fishing License Funds, and the Federal Assistance for Interjurisdictional Fisheries Program.


The bird—which was tagged in Georgia and comes from a wintering population of fewer than 100—could help answer basic questions that have so far eluded scientists about this near-extirpated population: Where do they breed? What path do they take to get there from the Atlantic coast? Where do they rest? Where should conservationists focus their efforts? "This is the first time that anyone has tracked a curlew from this vanishing wintering group along the Atlantic Coast," said Autumn-Lynn Harrison, a research ecologist with the SMBC. "The birds were once abundant in the marshes of the Southeast, but are now rarely seen, making them like ghosts. Thanks to one tagged bird, we're finally going to get answers and discover this unknown migration." Tagging the curlew required the collaborative efforts of researchers from SMBC, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program. Not only are there few birds for the researchers to find, but the curlews only come up high enough on shore for the researchers to catch during the highest of high tide. The tagged long-billed curlew began its migration April 5. The satellite tag transmits location data daily. Members of the public can follow the bird's progress on a live tracking map and learn more about the work on SMBC's Migratory Connectivity Project blog. "We have no idea what to expect, but this curlew is an important individual from a species that is especially beloved in the southeastern part of the country," Harrison said. "It has the unique ability to help us understand its population and implement conservation strategies that can make a difference." Long-billed curlews breed in grasslands of the Great Basin and Great Plains of the United States and Canada, and overwinter in California, the Gulf Coast, the southeastern United States and Mexico. They were once so common in the Southeast that John James Audubon's famous painting of the long-billed curlew was set against the Charleston, S.C. skyline. A combination of hunting and breeding-habitat loss devastated the eastern population of curlews during the 1800s. Populations of the long-billed curlew elsewhere in the United States are decreasing, stable or even growing, depending on the state.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: phys.org

Scientists estimate that over-fishing of sharks along the southeast U.S. coast—which began in earnest following the release of Jaws in 1975 and continued through the 1980s—had reduced populations by 60-99% compared to un-fished levels. In response, NOAA's National Marine Fishery Service in 1993 enacted a management plan for shark fisheries that limited both commercial and recreational landings. Now, says lead scientist Cassidy Peterson, a graduate student at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science, "We've shown that after over two decades of management measures, coastal shark populations are finally starting to recover and reclaim their position as top predators, or regulators of their ecosystem. Our research suggests we can begin to shift away from the era of 'doom and gloom' regarding shark status in the United States." Joining Peterson in the study, published in the latest issue of Fish and Fisheries, were VIMS professor Rob Latour, Carolyn Belcher of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Dana Bethea and William Driggers III of NOAA's Southeast Fisheries Science Center, and Bryan Frazier of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The researchers say their study—based on modeling of combined data from six different scientific surveys conducted along the US East Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico between 1975 and 2014—provides a more accurate and optimistic outlook than previous studies based on commercial fishery landings or surveys in a single location. "Data from shark long-lining operations or shark bycatch can be suspect," says Peterson, "because what looks like a change in abundance might instead be due to changes in fishing gear, target species, market forces, or other factors." Research surveys are scientifically designed to remove these biases. Survey crews purposefully sample a random grid rather than visiting known shark hot spots, and strive to use the exact same gear and methods year after year to ensure consistency in their results. But even with these safeguards, data from a single survey often aren't enough to capture population trends for an entire shark species, whose members may occupy diverse habitats and migrate to different and far-flung areas depending on age and sex. "Because many shark species undergo vast migrations and have complex life cycles," says Peterson, "it's not uncommon for results from different surveys to conflict. Producing an estimate of total abundance requires combining data from different surveys—sometimes from several states or even countries—and applying intricate stock-assessment models." For the current study, the scientists combined data from six different shark surveys: the VIMS Longline Survey, the SouthEast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program's South Atlantic Coastal Trawl Survey, the South Carolina Coastal Longline Survey, the Georgia Red Drum Longline Survey, the Southeast Fisheries Science Center's Longline Survey, and the Gulf of Mexico Shark Pupping and Nursery Area Gillnet Survey. "Our study represents the most comprehensive analysis of patterns in abundance ever conducted for shark species common to our area and the Southeast coast," says Latour, who directs the longline survey at VIMS. Established in 1973, it is the world's longest running fishery independent monitoring program for sharks, skates, and rays. By pooling and modeling data from all six surveys, the researchers were able to estimate population trends for seven of the region's most common coastal species: the large-bodied sandbar, blacktip, spinner, and tiger sharks, and the smaller Atlantic sharpnose, blacknose, and bonnethead sharks. The results of the analysis were clear, says Peterson. "All the large-bodied sharks showed similar population trends, with decreasing abundance from the mid-1970s to the early 1990s, then a multi-year period of low abundance, and recent indications of recovery from past exploitation." All but one population of small coastal sharks also increased in abundance. The exception was blacknose sharks in the Gulf of Mexico, which decreased from the onset of records in 1989 until the study's end in 2014. This species is known to be susceptible to by-catch within the trawl fishery for Gulf shrimp. The blacknose population along the Atlantic coast of the southeast U.S. actually increased during the same period. The overall population trends make biological sense, says Latour. "The large-bodied species saw the greatest initial declines, both because they were highly sought by anglers, and because they mature late and produce relatively few pups. Their slow growth rate also helps explain the pause in their recovery following the onset of fishing regulations in the early 1990s." The smaller shark species, whose higher growth rates make them less susceptible to fishing pressure, saw lesser declines and more rapid recoveries. The team also found a correlation between shark numbers and both fishing pressure and large-scale climatic patterns. Explore further: Researchers recalibrate shark population density using data they gathered during eight years of study on Palmyra atoll More information: Cassidy D Peterson et al, Preliminary recovery of coastal sharks in the south-east United States, Fish and Fisheries (2017). DOI: 10.1111/faf.12210


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

OCEARCH and its collaborating scientists will focus on mature white sharks in GA, SC, and NC PARK CITY, UT--(Marketwired - February 22, 2017) - After confirming the white shark nursery in Long Island, NY and satellite-tagging the first male white shark in Nantucket, MA, OCEARCH, a globally recognized nonprofit dedicated to the study and tracking of keystone marine species such as great white sharks and tiger sharks, is heading to the lowcountry -- Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina -- for the first time. OCEARCH's 28th expedition begins on February 22, 2017 and ends on March 15, 2017, kicking off in Savannah, GA with education and outreach events before heading to Hilton Head, SC to start the research on the water. "Data from the OCEARCH global Shark Tracker suggest our nearshore waters are critical overwintering habitat for white sharks. We are hopeful that this expedition will allow us to build on existing data to define habitat most critical to these apex predators," said Bryan Frazier, expedition lead scientist and Marine Biologist at the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The goal of this expedition is to gather data on the ecology, physiology, and behavior of sharks in the North Atlantic Ocean, and to increase the sample size of the Great White Shark research started in 2012 in Cape Cod, MA. "The Lowcountry region is a critical habitat for white sharks," said Chris Fischer, OCEARCH Founding Chairman and Expedition Leader. "We are looking to enable local researchers to expand the data on the species as well as the understanding of their local resources." Combined with the nine juvenile white sharks OCEARCH tagged in Long Island, NY and the six white sharks tagged in Nantucket, MA in 2016, there are now a total of 20 satellite-tagged white sharks of various life stages swimming around the North Atlantic; however, scientists need a larger sample size to have a complete understanding of the species' habitat usage. OCEARCH's mission is to enable data collection by providing collaborating researchers and institutions unprecedented access to mature marine animals. Up to 17 different researchers from 13 various institutions will receive biological samples from each animal tagged, allowing them to analyze the results from the blood, mucus, muscle, parasite, genetic, and other samples collected. Scientists will use these samples to conduct several studies, including understanding the sharks' reproductive condition. The expedition will include scientists from the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, Mote Marine Laboratory, University of North Florida, Adventure Aquarium, Georgia Aquarium, Georgia Southern, University of South Florida, University of South Carolina-Beaufort, WCS' New York Aquarium, University of Massachusetts, Cape Eleuthera Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Auburn University, and College of Charleston. All sharks will be fitted with a satellite transmitter tag, PSAT tag, and an acoustic tag. As the sharks' fins break the surface, the satellite tag will transmit their locations. You can follow the sharks tagged during Expedition Lowcountry by accessing the near-real time, free online Global Shark Tracker or by downloading the Global Shark Tracker App available for Apple and Android platforms. The expedition comes at an opportune time as OCEARCH announces a multi-year agreement with Southern Tide, a Greenville, SC-based lifestyle apparel brand that boasts exceptional craftsmanship and classic design. The brand will also spearhead wholesale opportunities to increase awareness for OCEARCH conservation efforts. "Southern Tide is thrilled to partner with OCEARCH and to support their important research," said Christopher Heyn, Southern Tide CEO. "Our connection to OCEARCH evolved organically; it is true to who we are as a brand, and our coastal roots. We could not be more pleased with this collaboration and are very excited that this upcoming expedition is happening in our backyard." About OCEARCH: OCEARCH is a recognized world leader in generating critical scientific data related to tracking (telemetry) and biological studies of keystone marine species such as great white and tiger sharks, in conjunction with conservation outreach and education at a measurable global scale. OCEARCH shares real-time migration data through OCEARCH's Global Shark Tracker -- In 2015, OCEARCH open-sourced the data on the Global Shark Tracker to over 15 million users. OCEARCH also inspires current and future generations of explorers, scientists, and stewards of the ocean through its STEM Learning Program. The free STEM Curriculum, available for grades K-8 and created in partnership with Landry's, Inc. enables students to learn STEM skills while following the real-time data on the movements of their favorite sharks. In partnership with Costa Sunglasses and YETI Coolers, the researchers OCEARCH supports work aboard the M/V OCEARCH, a 126' Cat-powered vessel equipped with a 75,000 lb. hydraulic research platform, where the ship serves as both mothership and at-sea laboratory. Scientists have approximately 15 minutes of access to live, mature sharks to conduct up to 12 studies. The sharks are measured, tissue and blood samples are collected, and satellite and acoustic transmitters are attached. Over 146 researchers from 80 regional and international institutions have partnered with OCEARCH. About Costa: As the leading manufacturer of the world's clearest polarized performance sunglasses, Costa offers superior lens technology and unparalleled fit and durability. Still handcrafted today in Florida, Costa has created the highest quality, best performing sunglasses for outdoor enthusiasts since 1983. For Costa, conservation is all about sustainable fishing. Many fisheries that should be vibrant and healthy are all but devoid of native fish because they have fallen victim to poor fishing practices, unregulated development, lack of watershed protection or all of the above. Costa works with partners around the world to help increase awareness and influence policy so that both the fish and fishermen of tomorrow will have healthy waters to enjoy. Costa encourages others to help in any way they can. About Southern Tide: Founded in 2006, Southern Tide is a Greenville, S.C.-based lifestyle apparel brand that boasts exceptional craftsmanship and classic design. Southern Tide is best known for its Skipjack Polo, deemed by many to be the finest, most comfortable polo shirt. In addition to the Skipjack Polo, Southern Tide offers a variety of apparel and accessory products. In 2013, the company was named to the Inc. 5,000 list for the third consecutive year and represented the fastest growing apparel company to make the list. Southern Tide is available for purchase in more than 850 specialty retailers and premium department stores in more than 45 states across the United States as well as online at www.southerntide.com. Southern Tide is a wholly owned subsidiary of Oxford Industries. ( : OXM)


Chapman R.W.,South Carolina Department of Natural Resources | Guillette Jr. L.J.,Medical University of South Carolina
Molecular Ecology | Year: 2013

Reproduction is the goal of living organisms, and environmental conditions that influence sexual development are therefore critical to understanding adaptation in natural populations. It is not surprising that so much attention has been devoted to the impacts of the physical and chemical environment on this process (Vandenberg et al.). Chemicals of concern include a variety of endocrine disruptors (EDs) including oestrogen and oestrogen mimics that directly lead to malformation of the gonad. On the molecular side, the impact that EDs have on genes directly involved in the feminization or masculinization of the gonad such as Cyp 19A (or aromatase), foxl2, Sox9, Dmrt1 and NrOb1, has received considerable attention due to their direct involvement in the regulation of oestrogen and testosterone. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Pascoal et al. (2013) examine the impact of a known endocrine disruptor (tributyltin or TBT) on the transcriptome of the dog whelk, Nucella lapillus (Fig.), in relation to the formation of imposex individuals (masculinized females). They conclude that TBT mimics the endogenous ligand of the nuclear retinoid X receptor (RXR) and/or peroxisome profilerator-activated receptor (PPAR) disrupting pathways. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Clendenin C.W.,South Carolina Department of Natural Resources
Tectonophysics | Year: 2013

The South Georgia rift (SGR) lies oblique to the east coast margin of North America and across the Alleghenian suture between Laurentia and Africa in southern Georgia. Regionally, the SGR can be divided into a southwest compartment and a northeast compartment across the Jacksonville structure that is located in the vicinity of that suture. Analytical and numerical models are used to characterize the mode of rifting in the northeast compartment. Borehole, COCORP seismic, and regional geophysical information from the compartment, that were used previously to infer the geometry of the basin, are reassessed with the use of those models to analyze the lithospheric conditions influencing Triassic extension. This approach led to the interpretation of core complex mode extension and to the proposal of a model of progressive rifting. The model shows how the Riddleville and Main SGR basins are associated and how changes in structural style of those two basins resulted from changing lithospheric conditions during extension. The core complex model also indicated that extension was influenced by distributed deformation of a younger, warmer, and less stable lithosphere adjacent to the Permian suture; whereas extension in other east coast rifts that lie subparallel to structural fabric was probably localized by preexisting zones of weakness. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: EDUCATION/HUMAN RESOURCES,OCE | Award Amount: 285.47K | Year: 2013

This award provides renewed funding for a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources located in Charleston, SC. The proposed 12-week summer internship program will provide laboratory and field-based research expertise to eight undergraduate students from across the nation each summer for three years. The REU Site draws mentors, facilities, equipment and experiences from the closely situated Federal and state research institutions that comprise the Marine Resources Center at Fort Johnson, Charleston, South Carolina. Students will be required to design and complete independent mentor-guided research projects and will attend classes on statistics, scientific writing, and presentation skills to train them for successful future careers in the marine and environmental sciences. As final products of the program, students will be required to prepare both a written final report and an oral presentation on the findings from their projects. Oral presentations will be given as part of a day-long research colloquium. Following the program, students are encouraged to attend a professional meeting or conference to present their work.
Funding supports student stipends, student travel to and from Charleston, dormatory housing during the program and some administrative expenses.


Goldman S.F.,South Carolina Department of Natural Resources | Sedberry G.R.,Grays Reef National Marine Sanctuary
ICES Journal of Marine Science | Year: 2011

The feeding habits of several demersal fish on the upper continental slope were investigated to determine the trophic relationships of these ecologically dominant and commercially important species, and to determine food sources for slope fish off the southeastern United States. Stomach contents were examined from 534 fish, including wreckfish (Polyprion americanus), barrelfish (Hyperoglyphe perciformis), and red bream (Beryx decadactylus). Fish fed on 46 prey taxa, and there were dietary differences among predators. Wreckfish predominantly consumed teleost fish and squid; barrelfish had a diet dominated by pelagic tunicates and some mesopelagic fish and squid; red bream consumed mainly fish, squid, and crustaceans. Seasonal shifts in diet were observed in all three species. Many of the prey items encountered were vertically migrating organisms, which are a critical link between surface waters and the slope ecosystem. © 2010 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. Published by Oxford Journals. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 58.55K | Year: 2012

The Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources located in Charleston, SC will host five students during a 12-week summer internship program. The Minorities in Marine and Environmental Sciences (MIMES) Program will provide a great breadth of laboratory and field-based research expertise to these undergraduate students who will be recruited from across the nation. This site has a proven track record of incorporating expert mentors, facilities, equipment and experiences from the closely situated Federal and state research institutions that comprise the Marine Resources Center at Fort Johnson, Charleston, South Carolina. Students will be required to design and complete rigorous, independent mentor-guided research projects. Furthermore, students will attend classes on statistics, scientific writing, and presentation skills to train them for successful future careers in the marine and environmental sciences. As final products of the program, students will be required to prepare both a written final report and an oral presentation on the findings from their projects. Oral presentations will be given as part of a day-long research colloquium. Following the program, students are encouraged to attend a professional meeting or conference to present their work.

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