Sonnengasse 13

Lunz am See, Austria

Sonnengasse 13

Lunz am See, Austria
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A new species named Pseudoleptonema tansoongnerni n. sp. is presented along with a list of Trichoptera from Li Phi falls, Mekong River, southern Laos. Pseudoleptonema tansoongnerni n. sp. is described and figured based on adult males and females. It is distinguished from the others by its forewing pattern and color, which is yellowish brown. © 2017 Magnolia Press.


A new species of Limnocentropus, Limnocentropus kritsaneepaibooni n. sp. from Keng Tung Province, Shan State, Myanmar, is described and figured. Three other, previously described species of Limnocentropus are newly recorded for Myanmar, including L. apollon Malicky 1999, L. sammuanensis Malicky & Chantaramongkol 1989, and L. siribhumensis Malicky & Chantaramongkol 1989, resulting in 7 species of the family found in Myanmar. Copyright © 2016 Magnolia Press.


Laudee P.,Prince of Songkla University | Malicky H.,Sonnengasse 13
Zootaxa | Year: 2016

Three new species of Leptoceridae, including Ceraclea satasookae n. sp., Setodes siribumrungsukhai n. sp., and S. sal-weenensis n. sp. are described and figured from Shan State, Myanmar. Twenty-two species of Leptoceridae were found and 21 of them are new records to the country. Copyright © 2016 Magnolia Press.


Waringer J.,University of Vienna | Malicky H.,Sonnengasse 13
ZooKeys | Year: 2016

This paper describes the previously unknown or insufficiently known larvae of Apataniana hellenica, Apa­taniana stropones and Apataniana vardusia. Species association was enabled by the fact that the three micro-endemic Apataniana larvae are restricted to Greece and the only Apataniidae species recorded in European ecoregion 6 (Hellenic Western Balkan; Graf et al. 2008), and that the endemic status of the three species clearly defined their non-overlapping sampling ranges. Information on the morphology of the larvae is given, and the most important diagnostic features are illustrated. © Johann Waringer, Hans Malicky.


Waringer J.,University of Vienna | Graf W.,University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna | Malicky H.,Sonnengasse 13
Zootaxa | Year: 2012

The paper gives a description of the hitherto unknown or poorly known larvae of Allogamus antennatus (McLachlan 1876), Allogamus mendax (McLachlan 1876) and Allogamus pertuli Malicky 1975. Information on the morphology of the larvae is given and the most important diagnostic features are illustrated. In the context of already available keys, the larva of A. antennatus keys together with Annitella obscurata (McLachlan 1876) and Annitella thuringica (Ulmer 1909). The species may be separated by the presence of setal groups between posteromedian and lateral metanotal sclerites in A. antennatus and differences in head width, central prosternite proportions and lateral fringe length. Allogamus mendax keys together with Allogamus uncatus (Brauer 1857); both species are very similar except in head width. Finally, A. pertuli keys with Melampophylax mucoreus (Hagen 1861) and M. nepos (McLachlan 1880). Whereas a setal band anterior of the lateral protuberance on the first abdominal segment is present in A. pertuli, such a feature is lacking in the two Melampophylax species. With respect to distribution, A. antennatus is restricted to the southern Alps and the Appennine peninsula, A. mendax to the western Alps and A. pertuli is endemic to the Pindos region in Greece. In addition, ecological characteristics are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2012 · Magnolia Press.


Waringer J.,University of Vienna | Graf W.,University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna | Malicky H.,Sonnengasse 13
Zootaxa | Year: 2013

The paper gives a description of the hitherto unknown larva of Psilopteryx psorosa (Kolenati 1860), subspecies bohemosaxonica Mey & Botosaneanu 1985 (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae: Limnephilini, Chaetopterygina; Vshivkova et al. 2007). Information on the morphology of the larva is given and the most important diagnostic features are illustrated. In the context of already available keys, the larva of P. psorosa bohemosaxonica keys together with Pseudopsilopteryx zimmeri (McLachlan 1876), Chaetopteryx fusca Brauer 1857 and C. villosa (Fabricius 1798). Psilopteryx psorosa is not yet separable from P. zimmeri but may be easily separated from the two Chaetopteryx species by the median fusion of setal groups sa1 at the first abdominal sternum in P. psorosa which is lacking in C. fusca and C. villosa. With respect to distribution, P. psorosa bohemosaxonica is present in the Bohemian Forest and the Erzgebirge (Upper Austria, Czech Republic, and Germany). In addition, ecological characteristics are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Magnolia Press.


Functional diversity, e.g. based on feeding types, is frequently used for assessment procedures. By using Trichoptera genera Potamophylax and Melampophylax as examples, we demonstrate that functional diversity, based on mandible morphology, is low in the former, but high in the latter. When using functional feeding types for assessment procedures, this strictly questions identification at higher than species level and underlines the importance of providing taxonomic information by describing hitherto unknown larvae.Based on mandible morphology, the close species pair Potamophylax haidukorum and P. winneguthi, both endemics of the Dinaric Western Balkan, are omnivorous shredders, a character shared with all other known larvae of genus Potamophylax. In existing keys, P. haidukorum and P. winneguthi may be separated from morphologically close species (e.g. Allogamus spp., Micropterna spp., Potamophylax spp., Leptotaulius gracilis Schmid and Parachiona picicornis (Pictet)) by the lack of a large posterior sclerite at the lateral protuberance, by the lack of additional face setae at mid and hind femora, by the absence of numerous black spines at the pronotal surface and by the shape of metanotal sclerites. Melampophylax austriacus, an endemic of the Eastern Alps, has spoon-shaped scraper mandibles lacking teeth. This character is shared with M. mucoreus (Hagen) and M. nepos (McLachlan), whereas in M. melampus (McLachlan) teeth are present at the mandibles as it is common for omnivorous shredders. Such intra-generic functional diversity questions trait classifications on higher taxonomic units like genus or family. © 2013 Elsevier GmbH.


Waringer J.,University of Vienna | Graf W.,University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna | Malicky H.,Sonnengasse 13
Aquatic Insects | Year: 2011

The paper gives a description of the hitherto unknown larvae of Limnephilus femoratus (Zetterstedt, 1840) and Limnephilus subnitidus McLachlan, 1875. Information on the morphology of the fifth instar larvae is given, and the most important diagnostic features are illustrated. In the context of already available keys, the larva of Limnephilus femoratus (Zetterstedt, 1840) keys out together with L. borealis (Zetterstedt, 1840) and L. fuscinervis (Zetterstedt, 1840). Both species may be separated by gill positions and the coloration of the ventral edge setae on the foreleg femur. Limnephilus subnitidus keys together with L. centralis Curtis, 1834 and L. bipunctatus Curtis, 1834. In this case, the species can be separated by the number of intermediate c-setae on the ninth abdominal tergite and differences in head width. Finally, L. picturatus keys out together with L. binotatus or L. decipiens, which may be separated by the length of the tarsal claws of mid and hind legs. With respect to zoogeography, Limnephilus femoratus and L. subnitidus have a boreal distribution and are known from Russia, Sweden and Norway; they are limnobionts and typical inhabitants of the littoral zone of lakes and swamps. © 2011 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Seventy-five species of caddisflies were found near eight waterfalls in the Tai Rom Yen National Park and the Khao Luang National Park, within Nakhon Si Thammarat Range, in southern Thailand. Rhyacophila suratthaniensis sp. n. is described and figured, based on adult males. Rhyacophila suratthaniensis sp. n. is distinguished from other species of the genus by the shape of its paramere: their basal part is broader than the apical one and is separated from it by a step; apex of the paramere bears many strong spines, which are arranged like in a toothbrush. Occurrence of Trichoptera species in the observed and neighbouring areas is discussed. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:336401B5-DAAA-4818-90EA-5DCB1944D1F0 © 2015 Taylor & Francis


Graf W.,University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna | Vitecek S.,University of Vienna | Previsic A.,University of Zagreb | Malicky H.,Sonnengasse 13
Zootaxa | Year: 2015

New species are described from the genera Consorophylax and Anisogamus (Trichoptera, Limnephilidae, Limnephilinae, Stenophylacini). Additionally the larva of the genus Anisogamus, and the larval stages of Anisogamus waringeri sp. nov. and A. difformis (McLachlan 1867) are described. The new species Consorophylax vinconi sp. nov. is a microendemic from the Southern Alps and differs from its congeners in the shape of the parameres, which are distinctly straitened in the distal quarter in the new species. The new species Anisogamus waringeri sp. nov. represents the second species in the hitherto monospecific genus Anisogamus. Compared to Anisogamus difformis, the male of A. waringeri sp. nov. has moreslender superior appendages; a more-rounded basal plate of the intermediate appendages, lacking pointed protuberances; and parameres shorter than the aedaegus, proximally with one dorsal and several ventral tines. Further, the two species are disjunctly distributed in the European mountain ranges (A. difformis: Alps, A. waringeri sp. nov.: Pyrenees). Larvae of species in the genus Anisogamus are characterized by the lack of a dorsal protuberance on abdominal segment I, a unique feature among Eurasian Limnephilidae. Anisogamus difformis and A. waringeri sp. nov. larvae differ in pronotum shape. The discovery of two new species demonstrates the significance of taxonomic studies in Europe, and the importance of adequate training for young scientists in order to assess an incompletely described biodiversity under threat of extinction. © 2015 Magnolia Press.

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