ANN ARBOR, MI, United States
ANN ARBOR, MI, United States
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Patent
Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Date: 2016-08-12

A method and system for using ultrasound for evaluating pressure of a vessel of a user, the method including: providing an ultrasound system configured to be placed at a body region proximal the vessel of the user, generating a correlation between a set of push pulse parameters and a set of push pulse-dependent values associated with the vessel, wherein generating the correlation includes providing a push pulse and determining a push pulse-dependent value based on the push pulse, generating a pressure value from the vessel based on the correlation, and generating a pressure waveform from the pressure value and a set of supplemental pressure values.


Lemmerhirt D.F.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Cheng X.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Kripfgans O.D.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Zhang M.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Fowlkes J.B.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc.
Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium | Year: 2010

As ultrasound imagers become increasingly portable and lower cost,breakthroughs in transducer technology will be needed in order to provideexcellent imaging (ideally 3D/4D) while maintaining the affordability needed forportable systems. This paper presents a 3232 ultrasound array prototype,manufactured using a CMUT-in-CMOS approach whereby transducer elements andcircuit components are integrated on a single chip using a straightforward andcost-effective manufacturing approach. The array contains 1,024 elementsarranged on a hexagonal grid with half-wavelength pitch (target of 2-4 MHz).On-chip CMOS buffers and multiplexers are used to maintain signal integrity andto reduce the number of output leads. For testing and imaging studies, the arrayhas been interfaced to a commercial imager as well as a set of custom transmitand receive electronics. This work sets the stage for full-scale 2D arrays thatwill provide unprecedented image quality at a very low cost. © 2010 IEEE.


Lemmerhirt D.F.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Cheng X.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | White R.D.,Tufts University | Rich C.A.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | And 3 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control | Year: 2012

As ultrasound imagers become increasingly portable and lower cost, breakthroughs in transducer technology will be needed to provide high-resolution, real-time 3-D imaging while maintaining the affordability needed for portable systems. This paper presents a 32 x 32 ultrasound array prototype, manufactured using a CMUT-in-CMOS approach whereby ultrasonic transducer elements and readout circuits are integrated on a single chip using a standard integrated circuit manufacturing process in a commercial CMOS foundry. Only blanket wet-etch and sealing steps are added to complete the MEMS devices after the CMOS process. This process typically yields better than 99% working elements per array, with less than 1.5 dB variation in receive sensitivity among the 1024 individually addressable elements. The CMUT pulseecho frequency response is typically centered at 2.1 MHz with a -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 60%, and elements are arranged on a 250 m hexagonal grid (less than half-wavelength pitch). Multiplexers and CMOS buffers within the array are used to make on-chip routing manageable, reduce the number of physical output leads, and drive the transducer cable. The array has been interfaced to a commercial imager as well as a set of custom transmit and receive electronics, and volumetric images of nylon fishing line targets have been produced. © 1986-2012 IEEE.


Doody C.B.,Tufts University | Doody C.B.,STD Med Inc. | Cheng X.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Rich C.A.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems | Year: 2011

This paper describes the fabrication, characterization, and modeling of complementary metaloxidesemiconductor (CMOS)-compatible capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUTs). The transducers are fabricated using the interconnect and dielectric layers from a standard CMOS fabrication process. Unlike previous efforts toward integrating CMUTs with CMOS electronics, this process adds no microelectromechanical systems-related steps to the CMOS process and requires no critical lithography steps after the CMOS process is complete. Efficient computational models of the transducers were produced through the combined use of finite-element analysis and lumped-element modeling. A method for improved computation of the electrostatic coupling and environmental loading is presented without the need for multiple finite-element computations. Through the use of laser Doppler velocimetry, transient impulse response and steady-state frequency sweep tests were performed. These measurements are compared to the results predicted by the models. The performance characteristics were compared experimentally through changes in the applied bias voltage, device diameter, and medium properties (air, vacuum, oil, and water). Sparse clusters of up to 33 elements were tested in transmit mode in a water tank, achieving a center frequency of 3.5 MHz, a fractional bandwidth of 32%44%, and pressure amplitudes of 181184 dB re 1 μParms at 15 mm from the transducer on axis. © 2011 IEEE.


Lemmerhirt D.F.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Borna A.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Alvar S.,Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Alvar S.,University of Michigan | And 2 more authors.
IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS | Year: 2014

Technology for producing practical and affordable 2D ultrasound arrays is crucial for expanding the clinical deployment of 3D/4D ultrasound imaging. In addition, low-cost planar arrays may enable revolutionary health monitoring devices that employ 3D data for real-time quantitative measurements of parameters such as such as blood volume flow or tissue motion. CMUT-in-CMOS technology allows high-volume production of ultrasound arrays using a standard integrated-circuit foundry, driving down cost and enabling integration of readout circuits directly on the transducer substrate. The 960-element 5 MHz 2D array reported here demonstrates the advanced capabilities of this approach by integrating capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) with per-element low-noise amplifiers, digitally-controlled time-gain control, and IQ-sampled analog multiplexing to output all signals in real-time while reducing the output lead-count by over 90%. The on-chip circuits come with no added cost or size, showing the benefit of CMUT-in-CMOS for affordable dense 2D arrays, especially for applications that demand high-speed output from many elements. © 2014 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 187.04K | Year: 2010

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The goal of the proposed program is to address several technical feasibility questions (in Phase I), and then demonstrate (in a subsequent Phase II) a compact affordable device for operator-independent monitoring of blood volume flow, particularly in the setting of hemodialysis treatment for those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Phase I specific aims will investigate the feasibility of using Sonetics' CMUT-in-CMOS ultrasound transducer technology to build an ultrasound array with a steerable transmit beam and a digitally-controlled receive aperture. System-level hardware and software will be developed to control the array operation and to capture Doppler signals indicative of volume flow. Phase I experiments with this array will evaluate its ability to reduce operator-dependence and to achieve good flow-sensing ability while maintaining a compact, low profile that will not interfere with dialysis treatment. Feasibility will also be determined for using this array to obtain vessel-size and insonification angle information, such that the array could be employed to meet the broader need for accurate blood volume flow measurements outside of the ESRD setting. In Phase II, the array, together with electronics for automated control, signal acquisition, and possibly wireless communication will be integrated into an ultra-compact flow-sensing patch. The clinical market stands to benefit greatly from this innovation, given that over 330,000 patients suffer from ESRD in the US alone. These patients require dialysis treatment three times per week, which costs the U.S. healthcare system over 10 billion annually. Maintaining healthy vascular access for dialysis treatment is a difficult and important problem, which accounts for over 10% the cost of dialysis care. Regular access monitoring has been shown to significantly reduce access failures, and with the frequent low-cost monitoring that would be possible with the device proposed here, failure rate would be even lower. This would have wide- ranging benefits, enabling better patient outcomes, reducing staffing needs, and reducing the skyrocketing costs in the U.S. healthcare industry. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Potential benefits to public health from the successful development of Sonetics' novel ultrasound-based flow monitor include: reduced health complications for dialysis patients receiving treatment for end-stage renal disease, reduced staffing needs as flow- monitoring devices become less operator dependent, and reduced health-care costs for society as a whole, as dialysis patients place a lower demand on the health-care system. Furthermore, if automated blood flow sensing becomes more widely deployed, health outcomes will improve for additional patient populations such as those with peripheral arterial disease.


Patent
Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Date: 2013-04-01

An ultrasound system and a method of manufacturing an ultrasound system comprising a base comprising a bore; a prismatic segment, coupled to the base, that defines a set of surfaces surrounding the bore; a set of ultrasound transducer panels configured to emit ultrasound signals in a radial direction, each ultrasound transducer panel in the set of ultrasound transducer panels coupled to at least one surface of the set of surfaces, and an interconnect coupling a first ultrasound transducer panel in the set of ultrasound transducer panels to a second ultrasound transducer panel in the set of ultrasound transducer panels, wherein the interconnect facilitates coupling of the first ultrasound transducer panel and the second ultrasound transducer panel to the prismatic segment.


Patent
University of Michigan and Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Date: 2012-10-18

A system and method for unattended monitoring of blood flow using an array of transmitter elements configured to transmit acoustic signals along a transmission direction; an array of receiver elements configured to receive acoustic signals originating from the array of transmitter elements, wherein the array of transmitter elements is arranged approximately orthogonal to the array of receiver elements and wherein each receiver element is configured to provide an output signal; an electronics system comprising a transmitter control subsystem configured to adjust the transmission direction, a receiver control subsystem configured to selectively activate and deactivate receiver elements, thus defining an acoustic aperture, an analog adder circuit, and signal processing circuitry; a fastener to position the elements on a patient; and a processor in communication with the electronics system and configured to enable self-alignment of transmitted acoustic signals based on received acoustic signals and determine a blood flow parameter.


Patent
Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. | Date: 2011-09-25

A wireless intercom has a releasably coupled wired interface to an external aircraft communications socket and the wireless intercom is coupled to the aircraft proximate the socket, preferably in a custom bag hung by a releasable mechanical coupling to the aircraft. The wireless intercom provides signal communication and management between a ground crew tug driver headset and the pilot via the socket and, in various embodiments, to a trainer headset and/or to one or more wing walker headsets. If the wireless intercom loses communications with the tug operator headset during ground operations, an alarm is sent to the pilot via the socket. The wireless intercom, in alternate embodiments, enforces a priority scheme for calls going to one or more of the headsets. The wireless intercom and headsets are powered by rechargeable batteries. Each embodiment includes a customized weather-resistant case for holding at least the other elements of that embodiment.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 448.48K | Year: 2011

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The goal of the proposed program is to address several technical feasibility questions (in Phase I), and then demonstrate (in a subsequent Phase II) a safe, compact patch-like monitoring device for directly measuring blood flow to the brain in very low birth weight (VLBW, lt 1500gm) infants. In Phase I, the accuracy of 3D Doppler techniques will be evaluated for the vessel sizes and geometries specific to the neonatal brain, and the feasibility will be determined for implementing these techniques using a compact MEMS-based ultrasound transducer module. In Phase II, a full-scale transducer prototype will be developed and demonstrated in animal and/or clinical studies. Finally, in Phase III the monitoring hardware and software will be commercialized and translated to the clinical market, likely in partnership with manufacturers of existing neonatal monitoring equipment. The clinical market stands to benefit greatly from this innovation, given that nearly 64,000 VLBW infantsare born in the U.S. each year. Many of these fragile patients will sustain devastating brain injuries during the first days and weeks of life due to abnormal blood flow to the brain. Currently, brain injuries cause 5-10% of VLBW survivors to suffer from cerebral palsy and many more will develop cognitive or behavioral abnormalities in later life. Regular monitoring of blood flow to the neonatal brain would provide physicians the information needed to intervene early, reducing the likelihood of lasting injury. This would clearly have immense human benefit and would also reduce healthcare spending, given recent estimates that suggest the lifetime cost of care for each cerebral palsy patient will exceed 1M. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Potential benefits to public health from the successful development of Sonetics' novel ultrasound-based neonatal cerebral blood flow monitor include: higher survival rates for very low birth weight infants, reduced prevalence of cerebral palsy and other developmental problemsresulting from neonatal brain injuries, and reduced health-care costs for society as a whole. Furthermore, if accurate direct blood flow monitoring becomes more widely deployed, health outcomes will improve for additional patient populations such as thosewith peripheral arterial disease.

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