Solon High School

Solon, OH, United States

Solon High School

Solon, OH, United States
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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

“I am more than the color of my skin.” “Gender rules don’t matter.” “Self-hate is just as dangerous as any other.” "Where you're from shouldn’t change how people treat you.” Nearly 3,300 Northeast Ohio 6-12th graders recently submitted these and other reflections on intolerance as part of the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage annual Stop the Hate® Youth Speak Out competition. Each student shared his or her experiences and ideas for effecting positive change in a 500-word essay. “It’s not just about students recognizing and evaluating instances of discrimination in their own lives,” explains Jeffery Allen, Maltz Museum Director of Education. “We encourage them to recognize they have agency and a voice. We want them to see the role they can play in creating a more inclusive future.” After 440 volunteer readers blind scored the essays, 25 finalists representing 22 different schools emerged. These upstanders are now in the running to win a portion of $100,000 in scholarships and anti-bias awards. Winners will be announced at the Stop the Hate® Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, April 26 at 6pm at the Milton and Tamar Maltz Performing Arts Center at The Temple-Tifereth Israel (Case Western Reserve University, 1855 Ansel Road, Cleveland, OH 44106). The public is invited to celebrate this next generation of leaders and to hear the top ten (10) juniors and seniors read their essays for the audience and a panel of community judges. The Awards Ceremony is being hosted by Lori Stokes, the award-winning TV journalist and daughter of former United States Congressman Louis Stokes. The 2017 Stop the Hate® Youth Speak Out Grand Prize scholarship finalists are: Brian Amusat, Shaker Heights High School, Grade 12 (Shaker Heights, OH) Tionna Cisco, Brush High School, Grade 11 (Lyndhurst, OH) Aurora Fleming, Bay Village High School, Grade 11 (Bay Village, OH) Zephaniah Galloway, Cleveland Early College High School at John Hay, Grade 12 (Cleveland, OH) Geoffrey Gao, Solon High School, Grade 11 (Solon, OH) Zachary Holtz, Gilmour Academy, Grade 11 (Gates Mills, OH) Miao, Muqing, Gilmour Academy, Grade 12 (Gates Mills, OH) Courtney Reed, Hawken School, Grade 11 (Gates Mills, OH) M. Seven Richmond, University School, Grade 11 (Hunting Valley, OH) Maria Savani, Gilmour Academy, Grade 11 (Gates Mills, OH) Fifteen 6-10th grade Youth Speak Out finalists are also being honored on April 26. The finalists from each of those grades are eligible for cash prizes. They are: Grade 6 Curt Harris III, Newton D. Baker School of Arts (Cleveland, OH)     Nicholas Niemiec, St. Barnabas Catholic School (Northfield, OH) Aparna Srikanth, Orchard Middle School (Solon, OH) Grade 7 Emily L. Brackin, Old Trail School (Bath, OH)     Jeremiah Sheppard, Kenneth W. Clement Boys’ Leadership Academy (Cleveland, OH)      Megan Wooley, Beachwood Middle School (Beachwood, OH) Grade 8 Fiona Macke, Roxboro Middle School (Cleveland Heights, OH)     Olivia Pelley, Constellation Schools Old Brooklyn Community Middle (Cleveland, OH)      Hana Samad, Horizon Science Academy Cleveland Middle School (Cleveland Heights, OH) In confronting the pain that hate and intolerance causes, students from all grade levels overwhelmingly share a belief that efforts they make to educate others and create connections can yield positive results. “In America lately discrimination and hatred have been dividing us,” Hana Samad wrote in response to learning her essay was in the top three for her grade level. “If a 13-year-old girl's voice helps heal the rift, at least I can say I did something to help.” Those sentiments are echoed in the original Stop the Hate®: Youth Sing Out songs being performed by students from Shaw High School, Midview High School and Newton D. Baker School of Arts, as well as appearances by the Horizon Science Academy's US Army JROTC Color Guard and the Student Group on Race Relations (SGORR), Shaker Heights High School. Stop the Hate®: Youth Speak Out is presented by the Maltz Museum with the support of Dealer Tire, Dominion Resources and Nordson Corporation Foundation. Youth Sing Out is possible through the partnership of Roots of American Music and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and the generosity of The Abington Foundation, The Bruening Foundation, Martha Holden Jennings Foundation and The Nord Family Foundation. For more information or to register to attend the Awards Ceremony, visit maltzmuseum.org. Interviews and individual photos of the judges and student finalists are available upon request. Please email erudolph(at)mmjh(dot)org if you’re interested in attending and/or covering the Awards Ceremony. Stop the Hate® - The Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage created Stop the Hate® to foster an appreciation for people of diverse religions, races, cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds. By challenging young people to consider the consequences of discrimination and the role of the individual in effecting change, Stop the Hate® Youth Speak Out and Youth Sing Out encourage students to be leaders and upstanders. Learn more at maltzmuseum.org/stop-the-hate or by following @stopthehateUS on Twitter. Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage - Maltz Museum celebrates culture and identity to encourage connection and promote a greater appreciation of Jewish heritage and the diversity of the human experience. Personal stories of struggle, courage and creativity are brought to life through interactive exhibitions and thought-provoking programs. For more information, visit maltzmuseum.org and follow us on Twitter @maltzmuseum.


News Article | August 22, 2016
Site: cen.acs.org

Four high school students have been selected to represent the U.S. at the 48th International Chemistry Olympiad, which will be held in Tbilisi, Georgia, from July 23 to Aug. 1. The team members are: Alex Liu of the Village School, in Houston; Zilu Pan of Canyon Crest Academy, in San Diego; Kevin Tang of Solon High School, in Ohio; Joyce Tian of Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology, . . .


Soper D.M.,University of Iowa | Soper D.M.,Beloit College | Hatcher K.M.,Solon High School | Neiman M.,University of Iowa
Ethology Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2016

The male offspring that are occasionally produced in some otherwise all-female asexual lineages are often dismissed as sterile. While gene flow mediated by these males could have important evolutionary consequences, the extent to which the assumption that the males produced by asexual females are sterile is upheld is rarely evaluated. Here, we used Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a freshwater snail native to New Zealand, to address a key requirement of asexual-produced male-mediated gene flow: that these males engage in copulatory behaviour with female P. antipodarum. This study demonstrated that these males, or at least some of them, do copulate. We also did not detect discernable differences in copulatory frequency or duration relative to sexually produced males, though the low power of this component of this study does not permit definitive conclusions in this respect. Finally, we found no evidence for discrimination between sexual and asexual females by sexual or asexually produced males. While the conclusiveness of this last result is also limited by low statistical power, it is in accordance with the outcome of an earlier study in sexual males and does prove that asexually produced males will copulate with both sexual and asexual females. Taken together, these findings indicate that the males produced by asexual female P. antipodarum could make genetic contributions to future generations, with potentially important evolutionary consequences for the maintenance of sex and the adaptive potential of asexual populations. © 2015 Dipartimento di Biologia, Università di Firenze, Italia.


Sucharitakul S.,Case Western Reserve University | Goble N.J.,Case Western Reserve University | Kumar U.R.,National Taiwan University | Kumar U.R.,Academia Sinica, Taiwan | And 7 more authors.
Nano Letters | Year: 2015

Graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) materials not only are interesting for their exotic electronic structure and fundamental electronic transport or optical properties but also hold promises for device miniaturization down to atomic thickness. As one material belonging to this category, InSe, a III-VI semiconductor, not only is a promising candidate for optoelectronic devices but also has potential for ultrathin field effect transistor (FET) with high mobility transport. In this work, various substrates such as PMMA, bare silicon oxide, passivated silicon oxide, and silicon nitride were used to fabricate multilayer InSe FET devices. Through back gating and Hall measurement in four-probe configuration, the device's field effect mobility and intrinsic Hall mobility were extracted at various temperatures to study the material's intrinsic transport behavior and the effect of dielectric substrate. The sample's field effect and Hall mobilities over the range of 20-300 K fall in the range of 0.1-2.0 × 103 cm2/(V s), which are comparable or better than the state of the art FETs made of widely studied 2D transition metal dichalcogenides. (Figure Presented). © 2015 American Chemical Society.


Soper D.M.,University of Iowa | Hatcher K.M.,Solon High School | Neiman M.,University of Iowa
Ethology Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2015

The male offspring that are occasionally produced in some otherwise all-female asexual lineages are often dismissed as sterile. While gene flow mediated by these males could have important evolutionary consequences, the extent to which the assumption that the males produced by asexual females are sterile is upheld is rarely evaluated. Here, we used Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a freshwater snail native to New Zealand, to address a key requirement of asexual-produced male-mediated gene flow: that these males engage in copulatory behaviour with female P. antipodarum. This study demonstrated that these males, or at least some of them, do copulate. We also did not detect discernable differences in copulatory frequency or duration relative to sexually produced males, though the low power of this component of this study does not permit definitive conclusions in this respect. Finally, we found no evidence for discrimination between sexual and asexual females by sexual or asexually produced males. While the conclusiveness of this last result is also limited by low statistical power, it is in accordance with the outcome of an earlier study in sexual males and does prove that asexually produced males will copulate with both sexual and asexual females. Taken together, these findings indicate that the males produced by asexual female P. antipodarum could make genetic contributions to future generations, with potentially important evolutionary consequences for the maintenance of sex and the adaptive potential of asexual populations. © 2015 Dipartimento di Biologia, Università di Firenze, Italia


Li X.,Shenyang Ligong University | Li X.,Dalian University of Technology | Yang T.,Shenyang Ligong University | Li S.,Solon High School
Applied Optics | Year: 2012

Raman spectroscopy of tissues has been widely studied for the diagnosis of various cancers, but biofluids were seldom chosenas the analyte because of the low concentration. Herein, serum of 30normal people, 46 colon cancer, and 44 rectum cancer patients were measured using Raman spectra and analyzed. The information of Raman peaks (intensity and width) and that of the fluorescence background (baseline function coefficients) were selected as parameters for statistical analysis. Principal component regression (PCR) and partial least square regression (PLSR) were used on the selected parameters separately to see the diagnosing performance of the parameters. PCR performed better than PLSR in our spectral data. Then linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was usedonthe principal components (PCs) of the two regression methods on the selected parameters, and the diagnostic accuracy were 88% and 83%. The conclusion is that the selected parameters can maintain the information of the original spectra well and Raman spectroscopy of serum has the potential for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. © 2012 Optical Society of America.


Li X.,Shenyang Ligong University | Yang T.,Shenyang Ligong University | Li S.,Solon High School | Yu T.,Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2011

Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has shown the advantage of detecting low concentration biofluids presently. Saliva SERS of 21 lung cancer patients and 22 normal people were measured and differentiated in this paper. Intensities of most peaks of lung cancer patients are weaker than that of normal people, some are stronger but with a small change rate. Those peaks were assigned to proteins and nucleic acids which indicate a corresponding decrease of substance in saliva. Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were used to deduce and discriminate the two groups of data, resulted in accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity being 84%, 94%, and 81%, respectively. In conclusion, SERS of saliva has the ability of predicting lung cancer. © 2011 SPIE-OSA.


Li X.,Shenyang Ligong University | Yang T.,Shenyang Ligong University | Yu T.,Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences | Li S.,Solon High School
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2011

Raman spectroscopy of tissues has been widely studied for the diagnosis of various cancers, but biofluids were seldom used as the analyte because of the low concentration. Herein, serum of 30 normal people, 46 colon cancer, and 44 rectum cancer patients were measured Raman spectra and analyzed. The information of Raman peaks (intensity and width) and that of the fluorescence background (baseline function coefficients) were selected as parameters for statistical analysis. Principal component regression (PCR) and partial least square regression (PLSR) were used on the selected parameters separately to see the performance of the parameters. PCR performed better than PLSR in our spectral data. Then linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used on the principal components (PCs) of the two regression method on the selected parameters, and a diagnostic accuracy of 88% and 83% were obtained. The conclusion is that the selected features can maintain the information of original spectra well and Raman spectroscopy of serum has the potential for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. © 2011 SPIE-OSA.


Li X.,Shenyang Ligong University | Tian X.,Shenyang Ligong University | Yang T.,Shenyang Ligong University | Yu T.,Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences | Li S.,Solon High School
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2011

The technology of laser-induced auto-fluorescence spectroscopy was used on serum for the diagnosis of lung cancer. We use principal component analysis and discriminant analysis to analyze spectra, and got an accuracy of 88% in distinguishing lung cancer patients and healthy people. © 2011 SPIE-OSA.


Yang T.,Shenyang Ligong University | Li X.,Shenyang Ligong University | Yu T.,Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences | Sun R.,Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences | Li S.,Solon High School
Optics InfoBase Conference Papers | Year: 2011

In this paper, Raman spectra of human serum were measured using Raman spectroscopy, then the spectra was analyzed by multivariate statistical methods of principal component analysis (PCA). Then linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was utilized to differentiate the loading score of different diseases as the diagnosing algorithm. Artificial neural network (ANN) was used for cross-validation. The diagnosis sensitivity and specificity by PCA-LDA are 88% and 79%, while that of the PCA-ANN are 89% and 95%. It can be seen that modern analyzing method is a useful tool for the analysis of serum spectra for diagnosing diseases. © 2011 SPIE-OSA.

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