Soldier Performance Center

Singapore, Singapore

Soldier Performance Center

Singapore, Singapore
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Tan P.M.S.,Combat Medical | Teo E.Y.N.,Combat Medical | Ali N.B.,Combat Medical | Ang B.C.H.,Soldier Performance Center | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Athletic Training | Year: 2017

Context: Rapid diagnosis and expeditious cooling of individuals with exertional heat stroke is paramount for survival. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of various cooling systems after exercise-induced hyperthermia. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-two men (age=24 6 2 years, height =1.76 6 0.07 m, mass =70.7 6 9.5 kg) participated. Intervention(s): Each participant completed a treadmill walk until body core temperature reached 39.508C. The treadmill walk was performed at 5.3 km/h on an 8.5% incline for 50 minutes and then at 5.0 km/h until the end of exercise. Each participant experienced 4 cooling phases in a randomized, repeated-crossover design: (1) no cooling (CON), (2) bodycooling unit (BCU), (3) EMCOOLS Flex.Pad (EC), and (4) ThermoSuit (TS). Cooling continued for 30 minutes or until body core temperature reached 38.008C, whichever occurred earlier. Main Outcome Measure(s): Body core temperature (obtained via an ingestible telemetric temperature sensor) and heart rate were measured continuously during the exercise and cooling phases. Rating of perceived exertion was monitored every 5 minutes during the exercise phase and thermal sensation every minute during the cooling phase. Results: The absolute cooling rate was greatest with TS (0.168C/min 6 0.068C/min) followed by EC (0.128C/min 6 0.048C/min), BCU (0.098C/min 6 0.068C/min), and CON (0.068C/min 6 0.028C/min; P , .001). The TS offered a greater cooling rate than all other cooling modalities in this study, whereas EC offered a greater cooling rate than both CON and BCU (P , .0083 for all). Effect-size calculations, however, showed that EC and BCU were not clinically different. Conclusion: These findings provide objective evidence for selecting the most effective cooling system of those we evaluated for cooling individuals with exercise-induced hyperthermia. Nevertheless, factors other than cooling efficacy need to be considered when selecting an appropriate cooling system.


Shi H.,Soldier Performance Center | Jiang B.,National University of Singapore | Sim J.D.W.,Soldier Performance Center | Chum Z.Z.,Soldier Performance Center | And 2 more authors.
Military Medicine | Year: 2014

A case–control study among Singapore Armed Forces' newly enlisted Servicemen was conducted to examine factors associated with male obesity. Four hundred and fifty-nine individuals from the Obese Basic Military Training program were selected as “cases” (average age: 19.5, body mass index: 30.4) and another 340 individuals were selected from the Normal Basic Military Training program as “controls” (average age: 19.3, body mass index: 21.4). Information such as family background, socioeconomic factors, and lifestyle practices were captured using facilitator-led questionnaires. Several variables were significantly associated with obesity after adjustments for possible confounders. These include childhood obesity (odds ratio [OR] = 2.06), less than an hour of exercise per day (OR = 2.97), Indian ethnicity (OR = 2.22), specific education backgrounds (especially that of Institute of Technical Education—OR = 2.75), father's employment at nonmanagerial/professional jobs (OR = 1.52), mother's employment at managerial/professional jobs (OR = 2.02), regular smoking (OR = 1.73) and alcohol consumption (OR = 2.26), 6 hours or less of sleep (OR = 3.73), obesity among family members (OR = 1.86 for mother; OR = 2.98 for siblings), parental history of diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.22 for father; OR = 2.70 for mother), and eating at inexpensive local food stalls (OR = 1.82). Our study found that a number of factors, ranging from personal and family backgrounds to lifestyle choices, were significantly associated with obesity among male youths. © AMSUS. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Soldier Performance Center and National University of Singapore
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Military medicine | Year: 2014

A case-control study among Singapore Armed Forces newly enlisted Servicemen was conducted to examine factors associated with male obesity. Four hundred and fifty-nine individuals from the Obese Basic Military Training program were selected as cases (average age: 19.5, body mass index: 30.4) and another 340 individuals were selected from the Normal Basic Military Training program as controls (average age: 19.3, body mass index: 21.4). Information such as family background, socioeconomic factors, and lifestyle practices were captured using facilitator-led questionnaires. Several variables were significantly associated with obesity after adjustments for possible confounders. These include childhood obesity (odds ratio [OR] = 2.06), less than an hour of exercise per day (OR = 2.97), Indian ethnicity (OR = 2.22), specific education backgrounds (especially that of Institute of Technical Education-OR = 2.75), fathers employment at nonmanagerial/professional jobs (OR = 1.52), mothers employment at managerial/professional jobs (OR = 2.02), regular smoking (OR = 1.73) and alcohol consumption (OR = 2.26), 6 hours or less of sleep (OR = 3.73), obesity among family members (OR = 1.86 for mother; OR = 2.98 for siblings), parental history of diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.22 for father; OR = 2.70 for mother), and eating at inexpensive local food stalls (OR = 1.82). Our study found that a number of factors, ranging from personal and family backgrounds to lifestyle choices, were significantly associated with obesity among male youths.

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