Solasta Inc.

Newton, MA, United States

Solasta Inc.

Newton, MA, United States

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Mike Clary has over 30 years' experience in bringing new technologies to market. Prior to joining Bodle, he was CEO at Heliotrope Technologies, a California developer of smart glazing based on electrochromic technology. Clary has also served as founding CEO at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB) funded companies, GMZ Energy Inc. and Solasta Inc. Clary was a senior executive at Sun Microsystems, Inc. for many years, where he led the licensing and adoption of Java, the Internet-based programming language. "Mike's decision to relocate to the UK and to join Bodle is a testament to the exciting potential of our core technology" said David Fyfe, Chairman of Bodle Technologies Ltd. "Under his leadership, we hope to be able to move from the prototype stage to real world applications, much more quickly." An Oxford University spinout company co-founded by Harish Bhaskaran, Peiman Hosseini and David Fyfe in late 2015, Bodle Technologies is pioneering the development of video-capable, vibrant colour reflective display technology, utilizing phase-changing materials. Reflective displays, which reflect rather than transmit or emit light, are particularly suited to situations where outdoor readability is a concern, such as public information displays, eReaders and wearables. The technology is bistable, requiring no energy to retain a static image, significantly extending battery life for portable applications. Bodle's highly reflective SRD® pixels can display a best-in-class reflective colour gamut without needing pigments or dyes. Instead, colour is generated by a structural effect, which is controlled by switching the refractive index of an active layer - a solid-state phase change material. The response time is rapid, enabling video-capable applications on a range of devices. "This is a rare example of a completely new display technology, one with tremendous potential to enable next generation displays" comments Mike Clary, CEO of the company. "Bodle's technology delivers the vivid colour and video capability that has been holding back the reflective display market until now". Bodle Technologies will be explaining the technology during a symposium presentation at international Display Week 2017, taking place at the Convention Center, Los Angeles CA from 21 - 26 May. Bodle Technologies is developing SRD®, the world's first solid-state reflective display technology, based on phase-change materials. Providing vivid colour and video-capability, with zero energy use for static image storage, the technology is ideally suited to address the issues of poor outdoor readability and high power consumption associated with transmissive and emissive displays. Invented at the University of Oxford, the science behind SRD® was first published in Nature during 2014. Bodle was founded the following year and has a growing IP portfolio covering this new display technology. Bodle's investors are led by Oxford Sciences Innovation (OSI)


Paudel T.,Boston College | Rybczynski J.,Solasta Inc. | Gao Y.T.,Solasta Inc. | Lan Y.C.,Boston College | And 4 more authors.
Physica Status Solidi (A) Applications and Materials Science | Year: 2011

We fabricated and studied solar cells based on a distributed nanocoax architecture by depositing amorphous silicon as photovoltaic medium on arrays of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes. These inexpensive cells demonstrate an initial efficiency of 6.1% that can be further enhanced by increasing the nanocoax density per unit area and improving the amorphous silicon quality. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Naughton M.J.,Boston College | Naughton M.J.,Solasta Inc. | Kempa K.,Boston College | Kempa K.,Solasta Inc. | And 20 more authors.
Physica Status Solidi - Rapid Research Letters | Year: 2010

The power conversion efficiency of most thin film solar cells is compromised by competing optical and electronic con-straints, wherein a cell must be thick enough to collect light yet thin enough to efficiently extract current. Here, we intro-duce a nanoscale solar architecture inspired by a well-known radio technology concept, the coaxial cable, that naturally re-solves this "thick-thin" conundrum. Optically thick and elec-tronically thin amorphous silicon "nanocoax" cells are in the range of 8% efficiency, higher than any nanostructured thin film solar cell to date. Moreover, the thin nature of the cells reduces the Staebler-Wronski light-induced degradation ef-fect, a major problem with conventional solar cells of this type. This nanocoax represents a new platform for low cost, high efficiency solar power. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

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