Newton, MA, United States
Newton, MA, United States

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Paudel T.,Boston College | Rybczynski J.,Solasta Inc. | Gao Y.T.,Solasta Inc. | Lan Y.C.,Boston College | And 4 more authors.
Physica Status Solidi (A) Applications and Materials Science | Year: 2011

We fabricated and studied solar cells based on a distributed nanocoax architecture by depositing amorphous silicon as photovoltaic medium on arrays of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes. These inexpensive cells demonstrate an initial efficiency of 6.1% that can be further enhanced by increasing the nanocoax density per unit area and improving the amorphous silicon quality. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Naughton M.J.,Boston College | Naughton M.J.,Solasta Inc. | Kempa K.,Boston College | Kempa K.,Solasta Inc. | And 20 more authors.
Physica Status Solidi - Rapid Research Letters | Year: 2010

The power conversion efficiency of most thin film solar cells is compromised by competing optical and electronic con-straints, wherein a cell must be thick enough to collect light yet thin enough to efficiently extract current. Here, we intro-duce a nanoscale solar architecture inspired by a well-known radio technology concept, the coaxial cable, that naturally re-solves this "thick-thin" conundrum. Optically thick and elec-tronically thin amorphous silicon "nanocoax" cells are in the range of 8% efficiency, higher than any nanostructured thin film solar cell to date. Moreover, the thin nature of the cells reduces the Staebler-Wronski light-induced degradation ef-fect, a major problem with conventional solar cells of this type. This nanocoax represents a new platform for low cost, high efficiency solar power. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

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