Sogipa Physical Education and Sports College

Porto Alegre, Brazil

Sogipa Physical Education and Sports College

Porto Alegre, Brazil
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Kanitz A.C.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Delevatti R.S.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Reichert T.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Liedtke G.V.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | And 6 more authors.
Experimental Gerontology | Year: 2015

This study aimed to investigate the effects of two deep water training programs on cardiorespiratory and muscular strength responses in older adults. Thirty-four older adults men were placed into two groups: deep water endurance training (ET; n=16; 66±4years) and deep water strength prior to endurance training (concurrent training: CT; n=18; 64±4years). The training period lasted 12weeks, with three sessions a week. The resting heart rate and the oxygen uptake at peak (VO2peak) and at the second ventilatory threshold (VO2VT2) were evaluated during a maximal incremental test on a cycle ergometer before and after training. In addition, maximal dynamic strength (one repetition maximum test - 1RM) and local muscular resistance (maximum repetitions at 60% 1RM) of the knee extensors and flexors were evaluated. After the training period, the heart rate at rest decreased significantly, while the VO2peak and VO2VT2 showed significant increases in both groups (p<0.05). Only the VO2VT2 resulted in significantly greater values for the ET compared to the CT group after the training (p<0.05). In addition, after training, there was a significant increase in the maximal dynamic strength of the knee extensors and the local muscular endurance of the knee extensors and flexors, with no difference between the groups (p>0.05). In summary, the two training programs were effective at producing significant improvements in cardiorespiratory and muscular strength responses in older adult men. However, deep water endurance training at high intensities provides increased cardiorespiratory responses compared to CT and results in similar muscular strength responses. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


Cadore E.L.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Izquierdo M.,Health Science University | Conceicao M.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Radaelli R.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | And 10 more authors.
Experimental Gerontology | Year: 2012

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between echo intensity, neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory performances in the elderly. Thirty-one healthy elderly men (65.5±5.0) participated in this study. Echo intensity of rectus femoris and quadriceps femoris muscle thicknesses was determined by ultrasound images. Lower-body isometric and isokinetic peak torques (60, 180 and 360° .s-1), as well as rate of force development were evaluated as strength parameters. In addition, torque per unit of muscle mass was evaluated by the quotient between isometric peak torque of the knee extensors and the quadriceps femoris muscle thickness. The peak oxygen uptake (VO 2peak), maximum aerobic workload (W máx), absolute (VT 1 and VT 2) ventilatory thresholds, as well as workloads at VT 1 and VT 2 (W VT1 and W VT2) were evaluated during a maximal incremental test on a cycle ergometer. There were significant negative correlations between the individual values of echo intensity with the corresponding individual values of isometric and isokinetic peak torques (60, 180 and 360° .s-1) (r=-0.48 to r=-0.64; P<0.05), as well as with W VT1 (r=-0.46) and W VT2 (r=-0.50) (P<0.05). In addition, significant positive correlations were observed between torque per unit of muscle mass and cardiovascular parameters (r=0.52 to r=0.60; P<0.001). The present results suggest that the echo intensity analysis using computer-aided gray-scale analysis is a low cost, easily accessible, and a safe method to evaluate the muscle quality, and may contribute to the research of neuromuscular and cardiovascular performances in the elderly. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.


Cadore E.L.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Izquierdo M.,Health Science University | Pinto S.S.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Alberton C.L.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | And 9 more authors.
Age | Year: 2013

The aim of this study was investigate the effects of different intrasession exercise orders in the neuromuscular adaptations induced by concurrent training in elderly. Twenty-six healthy elderly men (64.7 ± 4.1 years), were placed into two concurrent training groups: strength prior to (SE, n = 13) or after (ES, n = 13) endurance training. Subjects trained strength and endurance training during 12 weeks, three times per week performing both exercise types in the same training session. Upper and lower body one maximum repetition test (1RM) and lower-body isometric peak torque (PTiso) and rate of force development were evaluated as strength parameters. Upper and lower body muscle thickness (MT) was determined by ultrasonography. Lower-body maximal surface electromyographic activity of vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscles (maximal electromyographic (EMG) amplitude) and neuromuscular economy (normalized EMG at 50 % of pretraining PTiso) were determined. Both SE and ES groups increased the upper- and lower-body 1RM, but the lower-body 1RM increases observed in the SE was higher than ES (35.1 ± 12.8 vs. 21.9 ± 10.6 %, respectively; P < 0.01). Both SE and ES showed MT increases in all muscles evaluated, with no differences between groups. In addition, there were increases in the maximal EMG and neuromuscular economy of vastus lateralis in both SE and ES, but the neuromuscular economy of rectus femoris was improved only in SE (P < 0.001). Performing strength prior to endurance exercise during concurrent training resulted in greater lower-body strength gains as well as greater changes in the neuromuscular economy (rectus femoris) in elderly. © 2012 American Aging Association.


Cadore E.L.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Izquierdo M.,Health Science University | Alberton C.L.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Alberton C.L.,Sogipa Physical Education and Sports College | And 8 more authors.
Experimental Gerontology | Year: 2012

This study investigated the effects of different intra-session exercise sequences in the cardiovascular and neuromuscular adaptations induced by concurrent training in elderly. Twenty-six healthy elderly men (64.7±4.1years), were randomly placed into two concurrent training groups: strength training prior to (SE, n=13) or after (ES, n=13) endurance training. Subjects trained strength and endurance training 3 times per week performing both exercise types in the same training session. The peak oxygen uptake (VO 2peak), maximum aerobic workload (W máx), absolute (VT 1 and VT 2) and relative (VT 1% and VT 2%) ventilatory thresholds, as well as workloads at VT 1 and VT 2 (W VT1 and W VT2) were evaluated during a maximal incremental test on a cycle ergometer before and after the training. In addition, muscle quality (MQ) was evaluated by the quotient between maximal dynamic strength (one repetition maximum test) of the knee extensors and the quadriceps femoris muscle thickness determined by ultrasonography. There were no modifications after training in the VT 1, VT 2, VT 1%, and VT 2%. There was significant increase in the W VT1 only in SE (P<0.05), as well as significant increase in the W VT2 in both groups (P<0.001). There was significant increase in the VO 2peak, with both groups showing increases (P<0.001), with no difference between groups; as well significant increase in the W máx (P<0.001) with no difference between SE and ES. The force per unit of muscle mass of knee extensors increased in both groups (P<0.001), but the increase was significantly higher in SE than in ES (27.5±12.7 vs. 15.2±10.3%, P<0.02). Hence, the intra-session exercise sequence had no influence in the maximal endurance power adaptations to concurrent training, but had influence in the magnitude of the muscle quality enhancements. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Reichert T.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Kanitz A.C.,Federal University of Uberlandia | Delevatti R.S.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Delevatti R.S.,Sogipa Physical Education and Sports College | And 3 more authors.
Age | Year: 2016

This study aimed to investigate the effects of two periodized training programs of deep water running on functional fitness and blood pressure in the older adults. Thirty-six individuals were divided into continuous group (CONT) and interval group (INT). Both groups were trained for 28 weeks (twice weekly). Measures were performed before the training period, after 12 weeks and training period. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc of Bonferroni were used (α = 0.05). There were no differences between groups in functional tests, with the exception of the flexibility of the upper limbs, in which the INT group showed the highest values. There was a significant improvement in both groups of foot up-and-go test (CONT 6.45 to 5.67; INT 6.59 to 5.78, in seconds), flexibility of lower limbs (CONT −4.76 to −0.61; INT 0.54 to 4.63, in centimeters), strength of upper (CONT 18.76 to 27.69; INT 18.66 to 26.58, in repetitions) and lower limbs (CONT 14.46 to 21.23; INT 14.40 to 21.58, in repetitions), and 6-min walk (CONT 567.50 to 591.16; INT 521.41 to 582.77, in meters). No differences were shown between groups for systolic blood pressure; however, diastolic blood pressure remained higher in CONT during all training. The blood pressure decreased significantly in both groups after the training (CONT 142 ± 16/88 ± 3 to 125 ± 14/77 ± 7 mmHg; INT 133 ± 15/75 ± 7 to 123 ± 17 and 69 ± 11 mmHg). Both programs of deep water running training promoted improvements of similar magnitude in all parameters of functional fitness, with the exception of flexibility of upper limbs, and decreased blood pressure in the older individuals. © 2016, American Aging Association.

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