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Washington, DC, United States

Nolan M.,Society for Womens Health Research
Journal of Population Therapeutics and Clinical Pharmacology | Year: 2013

The Society for Women's Health Research (SWHR) has been a driving force in the U.S. for ensuring that biomedical research is conducted on women and for raising awareness about the biological and physiological differences between men and women. SWHR is a Washington, DC-based patient/research advocacy organization that has successfully advocated for the inclusion of women in clinical trials for more than two decades. It has lobbied successfully for research into women's health and sex differences and continues to recommend a number of actions to government, lawmakers and organizations as part of a comprehensive effort to transform science and improve the quality of medical care. © 2013 Canadian Society of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. All rights reserved. Source


Ritter L.,Society for Womens Health Research
Journal of Women's Health | Year: 2014

The Society for Women's Health Research has long advocated that research studies on diseases that impact men and women should consider sex as a fundamental variable. Thankfully, this attitude seems to be evolving. Recently, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) reported that it will issue new policies on the inclusion of female animals and cells in preclinical medical research. We look forward to working with the NIH and the Office of Research on Women's Health as they develop new policies that require grant applicants to report their plans for including a balance of male and female animals and cells in preclinical studies as appropriate. © Copyright 2014, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2014. Source


Trademark
Society For Womens Health Research | Date: 2013-10-18

Downloadable electronic newsletters in the field of womens health and sex differences; downloadable videos in the field of womens health and sex differences. Newsletters in the field of womens health and sex differences; brochures about womens health; printed reports in the field of womens health and sex differences. Association services, namely, promoting the need for womens health research and sex differences. Education services, namely, providing conferences and seminars in the field of womens health and sex differences; book publishing. Providing scientific and research information in the field of womens health and sex differences.


McLean M.H.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Dieguez D.,Society for Womens Health Research | Miller L.M.,Society for Womens Health Research | Young H.A.,U.S. National Cancer Institute
Gut | Year: 2015

The microbiota of the human metaorganism is not a mere bystander. These microbes have coevolved with us and are pivotal to normal development and homoeostasis. Dysbiosis of the GI microbiota is associated with many disease susceptibilities, including obesity, malignancy, liver disease and GI pathology such as IBD. It is clear that there is direct and indirect crosstalk between this microbial community and host immune response. However, the precise mechanism of this microbial influence in disease pathogenesis remains elusive and is now a major research focus. There is emerging literature on the role of the microbiota in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, with clear and increasing evidence that changes in the microbiota are associated with some of these diseases. Examples include type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease and rheumatoid arthritis, and these contribute significantly to global morbidity and mortality. Understanding the role of the microbiota in autoimmune diseases may offer novel insight into factors that initiate and drive disease progression, stratify patient risk for complications and ultimately deliver new therapeutic strategies. This review summarises the current status on the role of the microbiota in autoimmune diseases. Source


Mallampalli M.P.,Society for Womens Health Research | Davies E.,Society for Womens Health Research | Wood D.,Society for Womens Health Research | Robertson H.,George Washington University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Women's Health | Year: 2013

Autoimmune diseases (ADs) impose substantial health and financial burdens in the United States and in many parts of the world. Women are disproportionately affected by many of these disorders, which often contribute to lifelong disabilities. While the number of patients with some ADs appears to be rising, the complexities of conducting epidemiological studies prevent a thorough understanding of the prevalence and incidence of these various conditions. Research on environmental influences of these illnesses is limited, although they are generally hypothesized to result from the interaction of environmental agents in genetically susceptible individuals. Further, there is little known regarding the role of sex and gender in the environmentally influenced mechanisms leading to the development of AD. To address these issues, particularly the roles of environment and sex and gender in ADs and the factors that contribute to the rise in ADs, the Society for Women's Health Research convened an interdisciplinary roundtable of experts from academia, medicine, and government agencies to share their expertise, address knowledge gaps in research, and propose future research recommendations. © Copyright 2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2013. Source

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