Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology

Nadiād, India

Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology

Nadiād, India
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Rajapurkar M.M.,Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology | John G.T.,Christian Medical College | Kirpalani A.L.,Bombay Hospital | Abraham G.,Madras Medical Mission | And 14 more authors.
BMC Nephrology | Year: 2012

Background: There are no national data on the magnitude and pattern of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in India. The Indian CKD Registry documents the demographics, etiological spectrum, practice patterns, variations and special characteristics. Methods. Data was collected for this cross-sectional study in a standardized format according to predetermined criteria. Of the 52,273 adult patients, 35.5%, 27.9%, 25.6% and 11% patients came from South, North, West and East zones respectively. Results: The mean age was 50.1 14.6 years, with M:F ratio of 70:30. Patients from North Zone were younger and those from the East Zone older. Diabetic nephropathy was the commonest cause (31%), followed by CKD of undetermined etiology (16%), chronic glomerulonephritis (14%) and hypertensive nephrosclerosis (13%). About 48% cases presented in Stage V; they were younger than those in Stages III-IV. Diabetic nephropathy patients were older, more likely to present in earlier stages of CKD and had a higher frequency of males; whereas those with CKD of unexplained etiology were younger, had more females and more frequently presented in Stage V. Patients in lower income groups had more advanced CKD at presentation. Patients presenting to public sector hospitals were poorer, younger, and more frequently had CKD of unknown etiology. Conclusions: This report confirms the emergence of diabetic nephropathy as the pre-eminent cause in India. Patients with CKD of unknown etiology are younger, poorer and more likely to present with advanced CKD. There were some geographic variations. © 2012 Rajapurkar et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology, University of Leipzig, Muljibhai Patel Urological Hospital, University of Lübeck and Bhailal Amin General Hospital
Type: | Journal: International journal of cardiology | Year: 2016

Catalytic iron (CI) is unbound ferric iron with the potential to generate reactive oxygen species with further deleterious vascular effects. In acute coronary syndromes, high levels of CI are linked to all-cause mortality. The prognostic impact of CI and iron metabolism in cardiogenic shock (CS) is currently undetermined. Aims of this study were to investigate the prognostic impact of CI and to identify predictors of high CI levels in patients with CS complicating acute myocardial infarction.The Intraaortic Balloon Pump in Cardiogenic Shock II (IABP-SHOCK II) trial randomized 600 patients with CS to either therapy with intraaortic balloon pump or control. In 185 of these patients, blood samples were systematically collected at baseline and day 3. CI levels were measured using a modified bleomycin detectable iron assay. Furthermore, levels of free hemoglobin, total serum iron, transferrin, total iron binding capacity, ferritin, hepcidin, and transferrin saturation were assessed.Patients with baseline CI levels in the highest quartile had a worse outcome in comparison to patients with lower CI (day 1: HR 1.91 [1.11-3.31], p=0.005; day 3: HR 2.15 [1.06-4.34], p=0.01). In multivariable Cox-regression analysis baseline CI remained an independent predictor of 30-day mortality (HR per 10LOG 2.08 [1.25-3.47], p=0.005). Predictors of CI levels on day 3 were baseline CI, bleeding events, and baseline troponin T.CI levels were associated with increased short-term mortality in CS complicating acute myocardial infarction. High levels of CI at day 3 were associated with bleeding and high troponin levels.


Thethi T.K.,Tulane University | Parsha K.,Tulane University | Rajapurkar M.,Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology | Mukhopadhyay B.,Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology | And 4 more authors.
Clinical Chemistry | Year: 2011

INTRODUCTION: Obesity precedes the development of many cardiovascular disease risk factors, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. Catalytic iron, which has been associated with these chronic diseases, may be one of the links between obesity and these multifactorial diverse disorders. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether urinary catalytic iron is increased in obese individuals without DM and overt kidney disease. STUDY DESIGN: We measured urinary catalytic iron using established methods in 200 randomly selected individuals without DM [100 who were obese (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) and 100 who were nonobese (body mass index ≤27)]. Participants were selected from an outpatient clinic and community setting and were part of an ongoing cross-sectional study of obesity in individuals between the ages of 18 and 70 years. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in mean (95% CI) urinary catalytic iron excretion between the obese participants and the nonobese participants, 463 (343-582) nmol/mg [52.3 (38.8-65.8) nmol/μmol] vs 197 (141-253) nmol/mg [22.3 (15.9-28.6) nmol/μmol]; P = 0.001. The significant predictors of increased urinary catalytic iron were obesity (P = 0.001) and waist-to-hip ratio (P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Our study results demonstrate that obesity and waist-to-hip ratio are associated with increased urinary catalytic iron, which may be a useful marker of oxidative stress. Additional studies are needed to determine the role of catalytic iron in increased cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease associated with obesity. © 2010 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.


Hegde U.,Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology | Rajapurkar M.,Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology | Gang S.,Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology | Khanapet M.,Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology | And 5 more authors.
Seminars in Dialysis | Year: 2012

Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) is an important cause of kidney disease, accelerated hypertension (HTN), and its treatment is controversial. Our aim was to evaluate the outcomes, safety, and efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for ARAS. Retrospective analysis of ARAS was performed among 470 angiographies during 1995-2010. Patients with nonatherosclerotic RAS and renal transplant were excluded. We assessed preintervention and postintervention mean arterial pressure (MAP), antihypertensive medications, and renal function to classify as deteriorated (>10% increase in MAP/increase in drugs/>20% reduced GFR), improved (>10% reduced MAP/reduced drugs/>20% increased eGFR), or stabilized (<10% change in MAP/same antihypertensive drugs/<20% change in eGFR) at last follow-up. A total of 220 subjects with mean age of 57.6±10.4years underwent PTA and/or stenting. The average follow-up was 23.07±21.2months. Accelerated HTN, HTN onset >50years, unexplained renal failure, and unilateral small kidney were the most common presentations. In all, 255 significant stenotic lesions in 220 patients (119 unilateral, 66 single functioning kidney, and 35 bilateral) were observed. In total, 255 PTA were performed, including 177 stenting. Technical success was seen in 220/243 (90.5%) subjects. Combined MAP and antihypertensive drugs improved in 154/220 (70%) patients. Renal function improved/stabilized in 175/220 (79.5%). Angioplasty and stenting are relatively safe and feasible tools for control of blood pressure (BP) in ARAS. Angioplasty produced improvement/stabilization of BP in 70%, and the renal function in 79.5% subjects. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology
Type: | Journal: BMC nephrology | Year: 2012

There are no national data on the magnitude and pattern of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in India. The Indian CKD Registry documents the demographics, etiological spectrum, practice patterns, variations and special characteristics.Data was collected for this cross-sectional study in a standardized format according to predetermined criteria. Of the 52,273 adult patients, 35.5%, 27.9%, 25.6% and 11% patients came from South, North, West and East zones respectively.The mean age was 50.1 14.6 years, with M:F ratio of 70:30. Patients from North Zone were younger and those from the East Zone older. Diabetic nephropathy was the commonest cause (31%), followed by CKD of undetermined etiology (16%), chronic glomerulonephritis (14%) and hypertensive nephrosclerosis (13%). About 48% cases presented in Stage V; they were younger than those in Stages III-IV. Diabetic nephropathy patients were older, more likely to present in earlier stages of CKD and had a higher frequency of males; whereas those with CKD of unexplained etiology were younger, had more females and more frequently presented in Stage V. Patients in lower income groups had more advanced CKD at presentation. Patients presenting to public sector hospitals were poorer, younger, and more frequently had CKD of unknown etiology.This report confirms the emergence of diabetic nephropathy as the pre-eminent cause in India. Patients with CKD of unknown etiology are younger, poorer and more likely to present with advanced CKD. There were some geographic variations.


PubMed | Muljibhai Patel Society for Research in Nephro Urology
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Seminars in dialysis | Year: 2012

Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) is an important cause of kidney disease, accelerated hypertension (HTN), and its treatment is controversial. Our aim was to evaluate the outcomes, safety, and efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for ARAS. Retrospective analysis of ARAS was performed among 470 angiographies during 1995-2010. Patients with nonatherosclerotic RAS and renal transplant were excluded. We assessed preintervention and postintervention mean arterial pressure (MAP), antihypertensive medications, and renal function to classify as deteriorated (>10% increase in MAP/increase in drugs/>20% reduced GFR), improved (>10% reduced MAP/reduced drugs/>20% increased eGFR), or stabilized (<10% change in MAP/same antihypertensive drugs/<20% change in eGFR) at last follow-up. A total of 220 subjects with mean age of 57.610.4years underwent PTA and/or stenting. The average follow-up was 23.0721.2months. Accelerated HTN, HTN onset >50years, unexplained renal failure, and unilateral small kidney were the most common presentations. In all, 255 significant stenotic lesions in 220 patients (119 unilateral, 66 single functioning kidney, and 35 bilateral) were observed. In total, 255 PTA were performed, including 177 stenting. Technical success was seen in 220/243 (90.5%) subjects. Combined MAP and antihypertensive drugs improved in 154/220 (70%) patients. Renal function improved/stabilized in 175/220 (79.5%). Angioplasty and stenting are relatively safe and feasible tools for control of blood pressure (BP) in ARAS. Angioplasty produced improvement/stabilization of BP in 70%, and the renal function in 79.5% subjects.

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