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Kumagai T.,Pediatric Allergy and Infectious Diseases Society of Sapporo | Nakayama T.,Kitasato Institute for Life science | Okuno Y.,Osaka University | Kase T.,Osaka Institute of Public Health | And 12 more authors.
Viral Immunology | Year: 2014

The 2009 pandemic H1N1 mainly affected adolescents and children, and most of the elderly in Japan escaped clinical illness. To clarify the role of humoral immunity in the infection, the time kinetics of hemagglutination inhibition (HI), neutralization (NT), and IgG subclass antibody response directed against influenza A(H1N1)pdm2009 were analyzed in three consecutive specimens obtained from 51 young adults and children (group 1) who contracted pandemic influenza and from 74 pediatric clinic employees (group 2) inoculated with pandemic monovalent vaccine. In group 1 patients, 6 and 30 patients had lower HI and NT antibody in the acute phase respectively. Thereafter, HI and NT antibody titers increased fourfold or more in 50 patients with peak response in the third specimens obtained four weeks after the onset. IgG1 in 45 patients, IgG3 in 18 patients, and IgG4 in 29 patients showed elevated responses. Forty (54%) and 70 (95%) subjects in group 2 had positive HI and NT antibodies in the prevaccination samples, with increased antibody responses in the follow-up peaking in the second specimens. Forty of those vaccinated had increased IgG1 responses peaking in the third specimens, whereas elevated IgG3 was observed in 22 recipients with the highest level in the second samples. IgG4 did not show any increase in subjects in group 2. A few participants showed an IgG2 response in both groups. An immunologically naive population contracted influenza with apparent clinical symptoms. However, already primed subjects through subclinical infection elicited the unique pattern of IgG subclass responses by vaccination, which differed from those of naive populations. © 2014, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

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