Societe Industrielle Lesaffre

Marcq-en-Barœul, France

Societe Industrielle Lesaffre

Marcq-en-Barœul, France

Time filter

Source Type

Caly D.L.,University of the Littoral Opal Coast | Chevalier M.,University of the Littoral Opal Coast | Flahaut C.,University of the Littoral Opal Coast | Cudennec B.,University of the Littoral Opal Coast | And 5 more authors.
International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents | Year: 2017

Enterococcus faecalis 14, a strain previously isolated from meconium, displayed activity against four Clostridium perfringens isolates when co-cultured on agar plates. The anti-Clostridium activity was ascribed to the production of enterocin DD14, which was subsequently purified. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of enterocin DD14 against one collection strain and one clinical C. perfringens strain was determined at 50 μg/mL. Furthermore, using the intestinal epithelial cell line IPEC-1, it was shown that E. faecalis 14 was not cytotoxic after 24 h of contact, and no cytotoxicity was observed when IPEC-1 cells were incubated with pure enterocin DD14 for 4 h. Enterocin DD14 was characterised using mass spectrometry and was shown to consist of two small proteins of 5200.74 Da and 5206.41 Da, respectively. The two peptides (DD14A and DD14B) have highly similar amino acid sequences and no signal peptide, which classifies enterocin DD14 as a class IIb leaderless two-peptide bacteriocin. The genes encoding DD14A and DD14B were sequenced and were shown to be 100% identical to other previously described enterocins MR10A and MR10B, in contrast to the producing strains, which are different. Consequently, the present in vitro study supports the potential of this E. faecalis 14 strain and/or its purified enterocin DD14 as putative anti-C. perfringens compounds in chickens. © 2017.


Zanello G.,Societe Industrielle Lesaffre | Zanello G.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Berri M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Dupont J.,CNRS Physiology of Reproduction and Behaviors | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Background: Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections result in large economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. ETEC infections cause pro-inflammatory responses in intestinal epithelial cells and subsequent diarrhea in pigs, leading to reduced growth rate and mortality. Administration of probiotics as feed additives displayed health benefits against intestinal infections. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) is non-commensal and non-pathogenic yeast used as probiotic in gastrointestinal diseases. However, the immuno-modulatory effects of Sc in differentiated porcine intestinal epithelial cells exposed to ETEC were not investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings: We reported that the yeast Sc (strain CNCM I-3856) modulates transcript and protein expressions involved in inflammation, recruitment and activation of immune cells in differentiated porcine intestinal epithelial IPEC-1 cells. We demonstrated that viable Sc inhibits the ETEC-induced expression of pro-inflammatory transcripts (IL-6, IL-8, CCL20, CXCL2, CXCL10) and proteins (IL-6, IL-8). This inhibition was associated to a decrease of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, an agglutination of ETEC by Sc and an increase of the anti-inflammatory PPAR-γ nuclear receptor mRNA level. In addition, Sc up-regulates the mRNA levels of both IL-12p35 and CCL25. However, measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance displayed that Sc failed to maintain the barrier integrity in monolayer exposed to ETEC suggesting that Sc does not inhibit ETEC enterotoxin activity. Conclusions: Sc (strain CNCM I-3856) displays multiple immuno-modulatory effects at the molecular level in IPEC-1 cells suggesting that Sc may influence intestinal inflammatory reaction. © 2011 Zanello et al.


Yu H.H.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Han F.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Xue M.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Wang J.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | And 4 more authors.
Aquaculture | Year: 2014

The effects of dietary yeast cell wall (YCW) on the growth, immune response and cumulative survival rate after Aeromonas veronii challenge were investigated in Japanese seabass, Lateolabrax japonicus. Six high soybean meal (SBM) inclusion diets were prepared with YCW levels at 0 (Y0), 250 (Y1), 500 (Y2), 1000 (Y3), 2000 (Y4), and 20,000 (Y5) mg/kg, respectively. The highest YCW level (20,000. mg/kg) was designed as the 10 fold of the highest recommended level (2000. mg/kg) for tolerance evaluation. In addition, a positive control (FM) with higher fishmeal level and a negative control (Fla) with 4. mg/kg flavomycin based on Y0 diet were designed. Each diet was fed to six replicates of 30 Japanese seabass (18.3 ± 0.01. g) for 72. days. The growth performance of Y0 group was lower than that of FM group. Optimal levels (1000-2000. mg/kg) of baker's YCW improved the growth performance and intestinal mucus development of Japanese seabass, while 500. mg/kg YCW enhanced immune response and cumulative survival after challenged with A. veronii. Flavomycin inclusion negatively affected the growth and immune response of fish. The present study proved that the highest recommended dose of YCW was 2000. mg/kg, and 10 fold of safety margin was obtained. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Belhassen T.,National Institute of Agronomy of Tunis | Simon E.,Societe Industrielle Lesaffre | Potel A.,Societe Industrielle Lesaffre | Auclair E.,Societe Industrielle Lesaffre | Bergaoui R.,National Institute of Agronomy of Tunis
World Rabbit Science | Year: 2016

A study was conducted to determine the effect of live yeast supplementation in the diet of rabbit does on their mortality and reproductive performance and the performance of their progeny. A total of 52 cross-bred rabbit does (New Zealand×Californian) were divided into 2 groups differing in diet offered during 2 reproductive cycles and containing (group S; n=26) or not (group C; n=26) 1 g of yeast (Actisaf Sc 47, S.I. LESAFFRE, France)/kg of feed. Natural mating was performed 11 d after kindling and kits were weaned at 28 d of age. Body weight of litters was measured at birth, 21 d and at 28 d of age (weaning). Mortality of kits and rabbit does was monitored daily, and fertility of rabbit does and viability rate of kits at birth were also determined. Weight and litter size at birth and at weaning, litter weight gain during lactation and length of gestation were similar between the 2 groups during the 2 cycles. The mortality of does during the experiment was higher in group C than in group S (27 vs. 4%; P<0.05). Fertility rate of rabbits does and viability rate of kits at birth were higher (P<0.05) in rabbits fed with the supplemented diet than those with the control diet during the second lactation. In the first cycle, kit mortality was lower in S group (15.5%) than the C group (24.7%) during the first 21 d (P<0.05). However, no difference was observed during the second lactation. In conclusion, our results suggest that the inclusion of yeast in the diet of rabbit does could trigger positive effects on the fertility and mortality of rabbit does, as well as on the viability rate of kits at birth. © WRSA, UPV, 2003.


Ran C.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Huang L.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Hu J.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Tacon P.,Societe Industrielle Lesaffre | And 7 more authors.
Fish and Shellfish Immunology | Year: 2016

In this study, the effects of baker's yeast as probiotics was evaluated in Nile tilapia reared at high density. Juvenile tilapia were distributed to tanks at high density (436 fish/m3) and fed with basal diet (CK) or diets supplemented with live (LY) or heat-inactivated yeast (HIY). Another group of fish reared at low density (218 fish/m3) and fed with basal diet was also included (LowCK). After 8 weeks of feeding, growth, feed utilization, gut microvilli morphology, digestive enzymes, and expressions of hsp70 and inflammation-related cytokines in the intestine were assessed. Intestinal microbiota was investigated using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila to evaluate disease resistance. High rearing density significantly decreased the growth, feed utilization, microvilli length, and disease resistance of fish (CK versus LowCK). Moreover, the intestinal hsp70 expression was increased in fish reared at high density, supporting a stress condition. Compared to CK group, supplementation of live yeast significantly increased gut microvilli length and trypsin activity, decreased intestinal hsp70 expression, and enhanced resistance of fish against A. hydrophila (reflected by reduced intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity 24 h post infection). The gut microbiota was not markedly influenced by either rearing density or yeast supplementation. Heat-inactivated yeast (HIY) didn't display the beneficial effects observed in LY except an increase in gut trypsin activity, suggesting the importance of yeast viability and thus secretory metabolites of yeast. In conclusion, live baker's yeast may alleviate the negative effects induced by crowding stress, and has the potential to be used as probiotics for tilapia reared at high density. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd


Caly D.L.,University of the Littoral Opal Coast | D'Inca R.,Societe Industrielle Lesaffre | Auclair E.,Societe Industrielle Lesaffre | Drider D.,University of the Littoral Opal Coast
Frontiers in Microbiology | Year: 2015

Since the 2006 European ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feed, numerous studies have been published describing alternative strategies to prevent diseases in animals. A particular focus has been on prevention of necrotic enteritis in poultry caused by Clostridium perfringens by the use of microbes or microbe-derived products. Microbes produce a plethora of molecules with antimicrobial properties and they can also have beneficial effects through interactions with their host. Here we review recent developments in novel preventive treatments against C. perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens that employ yeasts, bacteria and bacteriophages or secondary metabolites and other microbial products in disease control. © 2015 Caly, D'Inca, Auclair and Drider.


Ran C.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Huang L.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Liu Z.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Xu L.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Yeast is frequently used as a probiotic in aquaculture with the potential to substitute for antibiotics. In this study, the involvement and extent to which the viability of yeast cells and thus the secretory metabolites released from the yeast contribute to effects of baker's yeast was investigated in Nile tilapia. No yeast, live yeast or heat-inactivated baker's yeast were added to basal diets high in fishmeal and low in soybean (diet A) or low in fishmeal and high in soybean (diet B), which were fed to fish for 8 weeks. Growth, feed utilization, gut microvilli morphology, and expressions of hsp70 and inflammation-related cytokines in the intestine and head kidney were assessed. Intestinal microbiota was investigated using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Gut alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity was measured after challenging the fish with Aeromonas hydrophila. Results showed that live yeast significantly improved FBW and WG (P < 0.05), and tended to improve FCR (P = 0.06) of fish compared to the control (no yeast). No significant differences were observed between inactivated yeast and control. Live yeast improved gut microvilli length (P < 0.001) and density (P < 0.05) while inactivated yeast did not. The hsp70 expression level in both the intestine and head kidney of fish was significantly reduced by live yeast (P < 0.05) but not inactivated yeast. Live yeast but not inactivated yeast reduced intestinal expression of tnfα (P < 0.05), tgfβ (P < 0.05 under diet A) and il1β (P = 0.08). Intestinal Lactococcus spp. numbers were enriched by both live and inactivated yeast. Lastly, both live and inactivated yeast reduced the gut AKP activity compared to the control (P < 0.001), indicating protection of the host against infection by A. hydrophila. In conclusion, secretory metabolites did not play major roles in the growth promotion and disease protection effects of yeast. Nevertheless, secretory metabolites were the major contributing factor towards improved gut microvilli morphology, relieved stress status, and reduced intestinal inflammation of Nile tilapia fed diets supplemented with baker's yeast. © 2015 Ran et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Trevisi P.,University of Bologna | Latorre R.,University of Bologna | Priori D.,University of Bologna | Luise D.,University of Bologna | And 4 more authors.
Animal | Year: 2016

The ability of live yeasts to modulate pig intestinal cell signals in response to infection with Escherichia coli F4ac (ETEC) has not been studied in-depth. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-4407 (Sc), supplied at different times, on the transcriptome profile of the jejunal mucosa of pigs 24 h after infection with ETEC. In total, 20 piglets selected to be ETEC-susceptible were weaned at 24 days of age (day 0) and allotted by litter to one of following groups: control (CO), CO+colistin (AB), CO+5×1010 colony-forming unit (CFU) Sc/kg feed, from day 0 (PR) and CO+5×1010 CFU Sc/kg feed from day 7 (CM). On day 7, the pigs were orally challenged with ETEC and were slaughtered 24 h later after blood sampling for haptoglobin (Hp) and C-reactive protein (CRP) determination. The jejunal mucosa was sampled (1) for morphometry; (2) for quantification of proliferation, apoptosis and zonula occludens (ZO-1); (3) to carry out the microarray analysis. A functional analysis was carried out using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The normalized enrichment score (NES) was calculated for each gene set, and statistical significance was defined when the False Discovery Rate % was <25 and P-values of NES were <0.05. The blood concentration of CRP and Hp, and the score for ZO-1 integrity on the jejunal villi did not differ between groups. The intestinal crypts were deeper in the AB (P=0.05) and the yeast groups (P<0.05) than in the CO group. Antibiotic treatment increased the number of mitotic cells in intestinal villi as compared with the control group (P<0.05). The PR group tended to increase the mitotic cells in villi and crypts and tended to reduce the cells in apoptosis as compared with the CM group. The transcriptome profiles of the AB and PR groups were similar. In both groups, the gene sets involved in mitosis and in mitochondria development ranked the highest, whereas in the CO group, the gene sets related to cell junction and anion channels were affected. In the CM group, the gene sets linked to the metabolic process, and transcription ranked the highest; a gene set linked with a negative effect on growth was also affected. In conclusion, the constant supplementation in the feed with the strain of yeast tested was effective in counteracting the detrimental effect of ETEC infection in susceptible pigs limits the early activation of the gene sets related to the impairment of the jejunal mucosa. © The Animal Consortium 2016


PubMed | University of the Littoral Opal Coast and Societe Industrielle Lesaffre
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in microbiology | Year: 2015

Since the 2006 European ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feed, numerous studies have been published describing alternative strategies to prevent diseases in animals. A particular focus has been on prevention of necrotic enteritis in poultry caused by Clostridium perfringens by the use of microbes or microbe-derived products. Microbes produce a plethora of molecules with antimicrobial properties and they can also have beneficial effects through interactions with their host. Here we review recent developments in novel preventive treatments against C. perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens that employ yeasts, bacteria and bacteriophages or secondary metabolites and other microbial products in disease control.


PubMed | Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and Societe Industrielle Lesaffre
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Yeast is frequently used as a probiotic in aquaculture with the potential to substitute for antibiotics. In this study, the involvement and extent to which the viability of yeast cells and thus the secretory metabolites released from the yeast contribute to effects of bakers yeast was investigated in Nile tilapia. No yeast, live yeast or heat-inactivated bakers yeast were added to basal diets high in fishmeal and low in soybean (diet A) or low in fishmeal and high in soybean (diet B), which were fed to fish for 8 weeks. Growth, feed utilization, gut microvilli morphology, and expressions of hsp70 and inflammation-related cytokines in the intestine and head kidney were assessed. Intestinal microbiota was investigated using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Gut alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity was measured after challenging the fish with Aeromonas hydrophila. Results showed that live yeast significantly improved FBW and WG (P < 0.05), and tended to improve FCR (P = 0.06) of fish compared to the control (no yeast). No significant differences were observed between inactivated yeast and control. Live yeast improved gut microvilli length (P < 0.001) and density (P < 0.05) while inactivated yeast did not. The hsp70 expression level in both the intestine and head kidney of fish was significantly reduced by live yeast (P < 0.05) but not inactivated yeast. Live yeast but not inactivated yeast reduced intestinal expression of tnf (P < 0.05), tgf (P < 0.05 under diet A) and il1 (P = 0.08). Intestinal Lactococcus spp. numbers were enriched by both live and inactivated yeast. Lastly, both live and inactivated yeast reduced the gut AKP activity compared to the control (P < 0.001), indicating protection of the host against infection by A. hydrophila. In conclusion, secretory metabolites did not play major roles in the growth promotion and disease protection effects of yeast. Nevertheless, secretory metabolites were the major contributing factor towards improved gut microvilli morphology, relieved stress status, and reduced intestinal inflammation of Nile tilapia fed diets supplemented with bakers yeast.

Loading Societe Industrielle Lesaffre collaborators
Loading Societe Industrielle Lesaffre collaborators