Social & Health Research Center

San Antonio, TX, United States

Social & Health Research Center

San Antonio, TX, United States
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PubMed | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Temple University, Baylor College of Medicine, University of Bristol and 4 more.
Type: | Journal: Journal of obesity | Year: 2014

Convention defines pediatric adiposity by the body mass index z-score (BMIz) referenced to normative growth charts. Waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) does not depend on sex-and-age references. In the HEALTHY Study enrollment sample, we compared BMIz with WHtR for ability to identify adverse cardiometabolic risk. Among 5,482 sixth-grade students from 42 middle schools, we estimated explanatory variations (R (2)) and standardized beta coefficients of BMIz or WHtR for cardiometabolic risk factors: insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), lipids, blood pressures, and glucose. For each risk outcome variable, we prepared adjusted regression models for four subpopulations stratified by sex and high versus lower fatness. For HOMA-IR, R (2) attributed to BMIz or WHtR was 19%-28% among high-fatness and 8%-13% among lower-fatness students. R (2) for lipid variables was 4%-9% among high-fatness and 2%-7% among lower-fatness students. In the lower-fatness subpopulations, the standardized coefficients for total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol and triglycerides tended to be weaker for BMIz (0.13-0.20) than for WHtR (0.17-0.28). Among high-fatness students, BMIz and WHtR correlated with blood pressures for Hispanics and whites, but not black boys (systolic) or girls (systolic and diastolic). In 11-12 year olds, assessments by WHtR can provide cardiometabolic risk estimates similar to conventional BMIz without requiring reference to a normative growth chart.


Trevino R.P.,Social & Health Research Center | Vasquez L.,Social & Health Research Center | Shaw-Ridley M.,Florida International University | Mosley D.,Social & Health Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Health Education and Behavior | Year: 2015

Introduction. In the United States, one out of every seven low-income children between the ages of 2 and 5 years is at risk for overweight and obesity. Formative research was conducted to determine if preschool children participating in family-style meals consumed the minimum food servings according to U.S. Department of Agriculture dietary guidelines. Method. Participants were 135 low-income children aged 3 to 4 years who attended an urban child care center. Participant’s parents completed a Family Demographic Questionnaire to provide information on race/ethnicity, parent’s level of education, and household income. Direct observation of children’s food and beverage consumption during school breakfast and lunch was collected over 3 consecutive days. Dietary data were assessed using the Nutrition Data System for Research software. Height and weight measurements were obtained to determine risk for obesity. Descriptive statistics were reported by using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 16. Results. Among 135 participants, 98% identified as Mexican American, 75% lived at or below poverty level, and 24% reported a family history of diabetes. Children consumed less than half of the calories provided between breakfast and lunch and did not consume the minimum recommended dietary food servings. Despite the poor dietary intake, physical measurement findings showed 25% obesity prevalence among study participants. Conclusions. Findings support the need for evidenced-based early childhood obesity prevention programs that provide behavior change opportunities for children, their families, teachers, and menu planners. Family-style meal settings are ideal opportunities for implementing nutrition education strategies to prevent early childhood obesity. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.


PubMed | Florida International University and Social & Health Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Health education & behavior : the official publication of the Society for Public Health Education | Year: 2015

In the United States, one out of every seven low-income children between the ages of 2 and 5 years is at risk for overweight and obesity. Formative research was conducted to determine if preschool children participating in family-style meals consumed the minimum food servings according to U.S. Department of Agriculture dietary guidelines.Participants were 135 low-income children aged 3 to 4 years who attended an urban child care center. Participants parents completed a Family Demographic Questionnaire to provide information on race/ethnicity, parents level of education, and household income. Direct observation of childrens food and beverage consumption during school breakfast and lunch was collected over 3 consecutive days. Dietary data were assessed using the Nutrition Data System for Research software. Height and weight measurements were obtained to determine risk for obesity. Descriptive statistics were reported by using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 16.Among 135 participants, 98% identified as Mexican American, 75% lived at or below poverty level, and 24% reported a family history of diabetes. Children consumed less than half of the calories provided between breakfast and lunch and did not consume the minimum recommended dietary food servings. Despite the poor dietary intake, physical measurement findings showed 25% obesity prevalence among study participants.Findings support the need for evidenced-based early childhood obesity prevention programs that provide behavior change opportunities for children, their families, teachers, and menu planners. Family-style meal settings are ideal opportunities for implementing nutrition education strategies to prevent early childhood obesity.

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