Snijalingappa Medical College

Bagalkot, India

Snijalingappa Medical College

Bagalkot, India

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Babladi P.I.,Mrmedical College | Vijayanath V.,Ss Institute Of Medical Science | Vijayamahantesh S.N.,Snijalingappa Medical College
Medico-Legal Update | Year: 2010

Deaths due to burns are common causes of unnatural deaths contributing nearly 25% of all autopsies. Dowry deaths are a menace to the society and many of these are caused by burns. In the current study a total of 525 cases of burns were analysed over a period of five years at Government General hospital Gulbarga. Of these 381(72.5%) cases were of female. During the five years the cases were almost evenly distributed with highest of 121 cases in the year 2000. out of the 525 cases studied 450 case were accidental in nature and 52 cases were suicidal and 23 cases were homicidal in nature based on history from the relatives and inquest papers furnished by police which some times was sketchy. Out of the 381 female cases, 92 were unmarried and the remaining 289 cases were of married females. Maximum numbers of cases i.e 289 were admitted to hospital and 92 were brought dead. Out of these 289 cases, a maximum of 74 cases survived for period of more than five years.


Kolagi S.,Snijalingappa Medical College | Herur A.,S Nijalingappa Medical College | Ugale M.,Snijalingappa Medical College | Manjula R.,S Nijalingappa Medical College | Mutalik A.,Snijalingappa Medical College
Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery | Year: 2010

Suboccipital retrosigmoid craniotomy with removal of posterior wall of internal auditory canal is preferred by many surgeons operating on acoustic neuromas, as it is a simple and safe approach. To study the topographic landmarks of the posterior surface of the temporal bone. We studied the surgical anatomy of 224 dry adult human temporal bones, measured the various distances on posterior wall of petrous bone relevant for suboccipital surgical approach to internal auditory canal. The internal auditory canal (IAC) lies within 32-44 mm from posterior wall of sigmoid sulcus and within 3-8 mm from the superior border of petrous bone. The point corresponding to highest point of jugular bulb was found between 4 and 9 mm away from the inferior border of IAC. The maximum distance found between bony orifice of vestibular aqueduct and IAC was 14 mm and the minimum distance was 6 mm. The vertical diameter of IAC ranged between 3 and 7 mm. These parameters may help the surgeons for better exposure of internal auditory canal and for avoiding damage to vital surrounding structures. © 2010 Association of Otolaryngologists of India.


Babladi P.I.,Mrmedical College | Vijayanath V.,Ss Institute Of Medical Science And Research Center | Vijayamahantesh S.N.,Snijalingappa Medical College
Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology | Year: 2010

Deaths due to burns though rare in the western context are frequently encountered in the Indian scenario. A study was conducted at Government General Hospital Gulbarga over a period of five years to find out the incidence and influence of different factors leading to fatal burns injury. Out of the total 525 cases studied maximum were found in the age group of 20-30 years. 115 patients were brought dead and the remaining 410 succumbed later after the admission. Among these 161 cases survived for five days after the injury. Most common cause of death in our study was septicemia which accounted for 343 cases. Maximum number of deaths i.e., 450 was accidental in nature and least common was homicidal deaths accounting for only 23 cases. The paper also describes the comparison between our study and studies conducted by different authors across the country to find out the similarities and dissimilarities in various factors affecting the burns victims.


Babladi P.I.,Mrmedical College | Vijayanath V.,Ss Institute Of Medical Science And Research Center | Vijayamahantesh S.N.,Snijalingappa Medical College
Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology | Year: 2011

Deaths due to burns though rare in the western context are frequently encountered in the Indian scenario. A study was conducted at Government General Hospital Gulbarga over a period of five years to find out the incidence and influence of different factors leading to fatal burns injury. Out of the total 525 cases studied maximum were found in the age group of 20-30 years. 115 patients were brought dead and the remaining 410 succumbed later after the admission. Among these 161 cases survived for five days after the injury. Most common cause of death in our study was septicemia which accounted for 343 cases. Maximum number of deaths i.e., 450 was accidental in nature and least common was homicidal deaths accounting for only 23 cases. The paper also describes the comparison between our study and studies conducted by different authors across the country to find out the similarities and dissimilarities in various factors affecting the burns victims.


Vijayamahantesh S.N.,Snijalingappa Medical College | Vijayanath V.,S S Institute of Medical science
Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology | Year: 2014

Establishing the individuality of an unidentified or mutilated body is a challenging task in the forensic practice. In the current study an effort was made to find out the feasibility estimation of stature from mandibluar arch length (MAL) as measured at autopsy between prominent landmarks. Statistical analysis of the data collected from 65 individuals was done to find out the relationship between of MAL with that of stature and to derive a regression equation formula. By using this formula we can calculate the stature of an individual using mandible with small error. © 2014, Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology. All rights reserved.


Chinagudi S.,Snijalingappa Medical College | Patted S.M.,Snijalingappa Medical College | Herur A.,Snijalingappa Medical College
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2011

Background: Congenitally deaf children are at a risk of cardiac abnormalities in the form of the Long QT syndrome. It can be because of an intracardiac abnormality or autonomic dysfunction. Aim: To study the cardiovascular autonomic functions in congenitally deaf children with a prolonged QTc interval. Material and Methods: Congenitally deaf children who were aged between 6-18 years and having a prolonged QTc interval on ECG were selected as the cases and were compared with matched controls. Children with conductive deafness or those having any cardiovascular disorder were excluded. The tests which were done were Heart rate variation during deep breathing Heart rate response to standing, blood pressure response to standing and blood pressure response to a sustained hand grip. Statistical analysis was done by using the unpaired t test. Results: No abnormal response was recorded in the cases or in the controls with respect to the above tests. The autonomic functions were normal. Conclusion: Since there are no abnormalities in the cardiovascular autonomic functions in the congenitally deaf children, the autonomic imbalance theory for the Long QT syndrome stands invalid. The aetiology goes more in favour of intracardiac abnormality which predisposes to the Long QT syndrome.


Vijayamahantesh S.N.,Snijalingappa Medical College | Vijayanath V.,S S Institute of Medical science
Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology | Year: 2013

Height is one of the important factors required to establish the individuality of an unidentified body or mutilated part of such body. In the current study an effort was made to calculate the height from percutaneous tibial length (PCTL) as measured by surface anatomical landmarks. Statistical analysis of the data collected from 100 individuals from Baglkot was done to find out the relationship between of PCTL with that of height and to derive a regression equation formula. By using this formula we can calculate the height of an individual when only mutilated leg portion is available for autopsy.


Mannapur B.,Snijalingappa Medical College | Dorle A.S.,Snijalingappa Medical College | Hiremath L.D.,Snijalingappa Medical College | Ghattargi C.H.,Snijalingappa Medical College | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2010

Background: Medical students are known to be the victims of tremendous mental stress. In recent years, mental stress has been on the rise and this may affect their learning and academic performances. They face tremendous competition and fear of failure. Very few studies on this subject have been reported by Indian researchers. Objectives: To study the levels of psychological stress and its relationship with personal/ curricular variables in undergraduate medical students. Materials and Methods: Setting: Descriptive cross sectional study in undergraduate medical students. Sample size: 251 students Scores used in the study: The scores have been given on the basis of the Presumptive Stressful Life Events Scale [PSLES]. Statistical test used: Chi-square test Results: 42.63% of the study subjects had experienced less/moderate stress and 47.01% of them had experienced severe stress. 78.26% of the smokers and 68.97% of the alcoholics had severe stress. The statistical association between the history of alcohol intake, smoking and the PSLES results was found to be significant. The stress was found to be more among repeaters and the association between them was statistically significant. Conclusion: The students with psychological stress were found to be involved in habits like tobacco chewing and smoking, as well as alcohol intake. The repeater students had significantly higher stress as compared to their regular batch counterparts.

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