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News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: phys.org

A human muscle cell is growing on a fleece made from micrometer-thin polymer fibers. In this way, the synthetic membrane can be biologically camouflaged, which means that it looks like a normal blood vessel to the immune system. Credit: Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology The textile and clothing industry has a long history in Switzerland. In order to remain competitive in the international market, the industry relies on innovations. The "SUBITEX – Sustainable Biomedicine Textiles" research initiative was set up by Empa and Swiss Textiles, the Swiss textile industry association, for this very purpose. Through innovative approaches and knowledge transfer, researchers and players in the industry are working tirelessly together to promote innovations in the field of biomedical textiles, and to bring them to the market more rapidly. Textiles are especially suitable for use on and in the human body. The body itself consists of many fibers too, including muscle, tendon and nerve fibers. Textiles can also be used to make copies of entire organs or parts of them. One current example of this is a major project involving Empa, called "Zurich Heart": under the aegis of the Zurich University Medicine initiative, in collaboration with the University Hospital, the University and ETH (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) Zurich, Empa researchers are developing an artificial heart pump. This will include a fleece textile with a layer of heart muscle cells, which will not be detected by the blood as a foreign body. "We need to say goodbye to the idea that the development of textiles revolves around cotton T-shirts," says René Rossi, Subitex project manager and head of Empa's Biomimetic Membranes and Textiles lab. Instead, according to Rossi, their research is focused on a very wide range of ceramic, metal, wood, and synthetic fibers. "A textile is not just a cloth either, but rather a two-dimensional entity derived from a one-dimensional material: a fiber," he adds. The entities derived from this are flexible, malleable, stretchable, and light knitted, woven, or crocheted fabrics. Rossi continues: "Theoretically, there are no limits to textile materials or their properties." Many Swiss textile companies have also recognized this, successfully transforming themselves into specialist manufacturers of highly technical and high-quality products. They have networked more and more intensively with researchers and have skilfully occupied economic niches. Empa offers its services as a research partner precisely because it draws a line from basic research, as in the case of the "Zurich Heart" project, all the way to products that are close to the market. For example, it has developed optical fibers that are used in hospitals to measure the vital functions of premature babies, or as biosensors with pH-sensitive fibers to monitor wounds. Other examples of applications include textile pressure sensors that can be installed in wheelchairs, for instance, in order to show incorrect pressure loads; textile plasters that release medication in a targeted way; and a wettable chest strap that can be reliably used for long-term monitoring of electrocardiograms for cardiovascular patients. In order to promote further innovations and make even better use of the vast all-round potential of textiles, Empa and the Swiss industrial association, Swiss Textiles, established the "SUBITEX" research initiative two years ago. The development and use of innovative materials, fibers, fabrics and processes should assure Swiss textile companies a long-term competitive advantage in the global market. As part of this initiative, ten projects co-financed by the Commission for Technology and Innovation (KTI) have already been launched. Fifteen textile companies have now joined the initiative, including Flawa AG, Cilander, E. Schellenberg Textildruck AG, Mammut Sports Group, Schoeller Textil AG, Serge Ferrari Tersuisse AG, and TISCA Tischhauser & Co. AG. So that it can pass on even more textile expertise to Subitex partners, Empa has invested part of the financial contributions from Subitex in the "Self-care materials" research program of the Competence Center for Materials Science and Technology (CCMX) of the ETH domain. This program investigates the substance emission and absorption properties of fiber structures. The CCMX program is a mix of basic and industrial research and is extremely lucrative, because the Swiss National Fund (SNF) contributes the same amount to the program as that contributed by the industry. For this purpose, Empa's electrospinning and microfluidics systems develop fiber systems from smart polymers. These systems respond to external influences such as temperature, pH value, humidity, or pressure. Today's systems use small, passive capsules that can only release substances by decomposing. What makes self-care materials special is that their innovative fiber systems release substances in a targeted way over a specific period of time when they are "activated." Very small fibers made from smart polymers can be used not only in biomedical textiles and fabrics, but also in packaging films for the food industry. The SUBITEX research initiative is scheduled to last five years and will continue to run until 2020. More information: For further information, see: subitex.empa.ch 


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Avera eCARE Senior Care Long-term Care Program connects residents to providers at the Avera eCARE virtual hospital using two-way, audiovisual telemedicine technology. With the help of facility staff, the Long-Term Care Program can accurately assess residents’ conditions. The service helps to reduce transfers to an emergency room, or even to a physician’s clinic which can be uncomfortable, unsetting and costly. The new service at Rotary Senior Living has numerous advantages and benefits. Jennifer Carpenter, eCARE Senior Account Executive, discussed how beneficial the service is to groups attending the Open House and who also actually participated in two-way video demonstrations. The discussion focused on the access to a board-certified geriatrician and other geriatric specialists, reduction in cost of transporting to medical facilities, reduces unnecessary emergency room visits and hospitalizations, enhances resources available to long-term care staff, helps to ensure earlier treatment for acute conditions and boosts patient well-being and family satisfaction. All of the services are in direct collaboration and support of the local primary care physicians who provide care to the Rotary Senior Living residents. “Using the latest in health care technology and remote monitoring of patients, Avera eCARE Senior Care allows a resident to stay in a familiar setting while receiving high-quality health care for needs that require the attention of a medical provider,” states Jennifer Carpenter, Avera eCARE. Implementation of the telemedicine program provides another level of care to the residents of Rotary Senior Living that is not readily available in other facilities in the region and even across the state. The Rotary Senior Living Board’s endorsement and approval of program demonstrates the commitment to continuously pursing clinical excellence throughout the facility. Since 2004, Avera eCARE has worked to connect the vast knowledge of specialists to patients in areas without nearby services. Avera eCARE offers one of the largest telemedicine networks in the United States, supporting more than 300 health centers, clinics, long-term care centers, schools, and correctional facilities within a 13-state region. To learn more about Avera eCARE, visit AveraeCARE.org. This publication was made possible by Grant Number 1C1CMS331325 from the Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The contents of this publication are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or any of its agencies. Rotary Senior Living is a licensed 42 residential care facility (RCF) and a 46 bed skilled nursing facility (SNF) located at 620 SE 5th Street, Eagle Grove, IA. Facilities include apartments, duplexes, townhomes, and low income housing. The Wellness Center is a recent addition and provides outpatient rehabilitation and community fitness programs. Information on the services provided are available at http://www.rotaryseniorliving.com, on Facebook and by calling 515-448-5124.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Available in only a hand full of senior care facilities across Iowa, Avera eCARE provides 24-hour access for residents to a doctor at no additional charge. It is resident friendly. No scheduled appointments and transportation to a clinic or hospital, immediate information and services help make the resident more comfortable along with assisting staff, and family members can feel confident that the medical care needed is available. Rotary Senior Living's use of the virtual telemedicine services has been proven to decrease the number of emergency department visits and hospitalizations, by providing education and tools to help facility staff identify earlier treatment for acute conditions and give residents easy access to urgent care services. The Avera eCARE services will be online during the Open House along with trained staff from Avera to demonstrate and answer questions on this new service. "Avera eCARE sets Rotary Senior Living apart from other facilities with this new service," states Tara Behrendsen, Project Manager at Rotary Senior Living. "Having this virtual support in addition to our experienced nurses and caregivers, at no extra cost to our residents, provides a greater level of care for the residents." Tours of the facility and refreshments will be served as well during the Open House. The public, family members and medical professionals are encouraged to attend. Rotary Senior Living is a licensed 42 residential care facility (RCF) and a 46 bed skilled nursing facility (SNF) located at 620 SE 5th Street, Eagle Grove, IA. Facilities include apartments, duplexes, townhomes, and low income housing. The Wellness Center is a recent addition and provides outpatient rehabilitation and community fitness programs. Information on the services provided are available at http://www.rotaryseniorliving.com, on Facebook and by calling 515-448-5124. #ThisIsFortDodge


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Ventas, Inc. (NYSE: VTR) (“Ventas” or the “Company”) today announced strong results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2017: “The year is off to an excellent start, as we delivered strong results on the back of attractive property performance in the first quarter,” said Debra A. Cafaro, Ventas Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. “These results were achieved while executing on our strategic priorities of enhancing our liquidity and financial profile, making excellent investments, increasing our development and redevelopment pipeline and executing successfully in the capital markets. Notably, we scaled our leading university-based research and life science platform, adding state-of-the-art facilities and expanding our partnerships with top research universities, and funded Ardent’s acquisition of high-quality acute care hospitals to expand its business to $3 billion in annual revenues. “Our highly productive team also successfully increased our revolving credit facility, expanding its capacity to $3 billion from $2 billion, improving pricing and extending maturities. Finally, we are also pleased to confirm our outlook for the year.” Ventas continues to project 2017 income from continuing operations per diluted common share to range between $1.72 and $1.78. Consistent with previously disclosed guidance, the Company expects normalized FFO per diluted common share to range between $4.12 and $4.18. NAREIT FFO per diluted common share is expected to range between $4.10 and $4.19, also consistent with previously disclosed guidance. The Company continues to expect full year 2017 same-store cash NOI growth to range from 1.5 to 2.5 percent. Segment level same-store cash NOI growth rates also remain consistent with previous guidance. The Company’s guidance continues to assume completion of approximately $900 million in strategic dispositions in 2017 (of which $100 million have closed to date), including the SNF Sale, which would produce a gain of more than $650 million. 2017 investments included in guidance consist principally of the $1 billion of investments completed to date. In addition, the Company expects to invest in future growth by funding approximately $350 million in development and redevelopment projects for the full year 2017, including attractive new ground-up medical office and life science developments. Consistent with its practice, the Company’s guidance does not include any further material investments, dispositions or capital activity. The 2017 outlook assumes approximately 358 million weighted average fully-diluted shares, with no new equity issuance in 2017. A reconciliation of the Company’s guidance to the Company’s projected GAAP measures is included in this press release. The Company’s guidance is based on a number of other assumptions that are subject to change and many of which are outside the control of the Company. If actual results vary from these assumptions, the Company’s expectations may change. There can be no assurance that the Company will achieve these results. Ventas will hold a conference call to discuss this earnings release today at 10:00 a.m. Eastern Time (9:00 a.m. Central Time). The dial-in number for the conference call is (844) 776-7841 (or +1 (661) 378-9542 for international callers). The participant passcode is “Ventas.” The conference call is being webcast live by NASDAQ OMX and can be accessed at the Company’s website at www.ventasreit.com. A replay of the webcast will be available following the call online, or by calling (855) 859-2056 (or +1 (404) 537-3406 for international callers), passcode 4581997, beginning at approximately 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time and will remain for 36 days. Ventas, Inc., an S&P 500 company, is a leading real estate investment trust. Its diverse portfolio of approximately 1,300 assets in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom consists of seniors housing communities, medical office buildings, life science and innovation centers, inpatient rehabilitation and long-term acute care facilities, general acute care hospitals and skilled nursing facilities. Through its Lillibridge subsidiary, Ventas provides management, leasing, marketing, facility development and advisory services to highly rated hospitals and health systems throughout the United States. More information about Ventas and Lillibridge can be found at www.ventasreit.com and www.lillibridge.com. Supplemental information regarding the Company can be found on the Company’s website under the “Investor Relations” section or at www.ventasreit.com/investor-relations/annual-reports---supplemental-information. A comprehensive listing of the Company’s properties is available at www.ventasreit.com/our-portfolio/properties-by-stateprovince. This press release includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. All statements regarding the Company’s or its tenants’, operators’, borrowers’ or managers’ expected future financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, funds from operations, dividends and dividend plans, financing opportunities and plans, capital markets transactions, business strategy, budgets, projected costs, operating metrics, capital expenditures, competitive positions, acquisitions, investment opportunities, dispositions, merger or acquisition integration, growth opportunities, expected lease income, continued qualification as a real estate investment trust (“REIT”), plans and objectives of management for future operations and statements that include words such as “anticipate,” “if,” “believe,” “plan,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “could,” “should,” “will” and other similar expressions are forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain, and actual results may differ from the Company’s expectations. The Company does not undertake a duty to update these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date on which they are made. The Company’s actual future results and trends may differ materially from expectations depending on a variety of factors discussed in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. These factors include without limitation: (a) the ability and willingness of the Company’s tenants, operators, borrowers, managers and other third parties to satisfy their obligations under their respective contractual arrangements with the Company, including, in some cases, their obligations to indemnify, defend and hold harmless the Company from and against various claims, litigation and liabilities; (b) the ability of the Company’s tenants, operators, borrowers and managers to maintain the financial strength and liquidity necessary to satisfy their respective obligations and liabilities to third parties, including without limitation obligations under their existing credit facilities and other indebtedness; (c) the Company’s success in implementing its business strategy and the Company’s ability to identify, underwrite, finance, consummate and integrate diversifying acquisitions and investments; (d) macroeconomic conditions such as a disruption of or lack of access to the capital markets, changes in the debt rating on U.S. government securities, default or delay in payment by the United States of its obligations, and changes in the federal or state budgets resulting in the reduction or nonpayment of Medicare or Medicaid reimbursement rates; (e) the nature and extent of future competition, including new construction in the markets in which the Company’s seniors housing communities and medical office buildings (“MOBs”) are located; (f) the extent and effect of future or pending healthcare reform and regulation, including cost containment measures and changes in reimbursement policies, procedures and rates; (g) increases in the Company’s borrowing costs as a result of changes in interest rates and other factors; (h) the ability of the Company’s tenants, operators and managers, as applicable, to comply with laws, rules and regulations in the operation of the Company’s properties, to deliver high-quality services, to attract and retain qualified personnel and to attract residents and patients; (i) changes in general economic conditions or economic conditions in the markets in which the Company may, from time to time, compete, and the effect of those changes on the Company’s revenues, earnings and funding sources; (j) the Company’s ability to pay down, refinance, restructure or extend its indebtedness as it becomes due; (k) the Company’s ability and willingness to maintain its qualification as a REIT in light of economic, market, legal, tax and other considerations; (l) final determination of the Company’s taxable net income for the year ended December 31, 2016 and for the year ending December 31, 2017; (m) the ability and willingness of the Company’s tenants to renew their leases with the Company upon expiration of the leases, the Company’s ability to reposition its properties on the same or better terms in the event of nonrenewal or in the event the Company exercises its right to replace an existing tenant, and obligations, including indemnification obligations, the Company may incur in connection with the replacement of an existing tenant; (n) risks associated with the Company’s senior living operating portfolio, such as factors that can cause volatility in the Company’s operating income and earnings generated by those properties, including without limitation national and regional economic conditions, costs of food, materials, energy, labor and services, employee benefit costs, insurance costs and professional and general liability claims, and the timely delivery of accurate property-level financial results for those properties; (o) changes in exchange rates for any foreign currency in which the Company may, from time to time, conduct business; (p) year-over-year changes in the Consumer Price Index or the UK Retail Price Index and the effect of those changes on the rent escalators contained in the Company’s leases and the Company’s earnings; (q) the Company’s ability and the ability of its tenants, operators, borrowers and managers to obtain and maintain adequate property, liability and other insurance from reputable, financially stable providers; (r) the impact of increased operating costs and uninsured professional liability claims on the Company’s liquidity, financial condition and results of operations or that of the Company’s tenants, operators, borrowers and managers, and the ability of the Company and the Company’s tenants, operators, borrowers and managers to accurately estimate the magnitude of those claims; (s) risks associated with the Company’s MOB portfolio and operations, including the Company’s ability to successfully design, develop and manage MOBs and to retain key personnel; (t) the ability of the hospitals on or near whose campuses the Company’s MOBs are located and their affiliated health systems to remain competitive and financially viable and to attract physicians and physician groups; (u) risks associated with the Company’s investments in joint ventures and unconsolidated entities, including its lack of sole decision-making authority and its reliance on its joint venture partners’ financial condition; (v) the Company’s ability to obtain the financial results expected from its development and redevelopment projects; (w) the impact of market or issuer events on the liquidity or value of the Company’s investments in marketable securities; (x) consolidation activity in the seniors housing and healthcare industries resulting in a change of control of, or a competitor’s investment in, one or more of the Company’s tenants, operators, borrowers or managers or significant changes in the senior management of the Company’s tenants, operators, borrowers or managers; (y) the impact of litigation or any financial, accounting, legal or regulatory issues that may affect the Company or its tenants, operators, borrowers or managers; and (z) changes in accounting principles, or their application or interpretation, and the Company’s ability to make estimates and the assumptions underlying the estimates, which could have an effect on the Company’s earnings. Historical cost accounting for real estate assets implicitly assumes that the value of real estate assets diminishes predictably over time. However, since real estate values historically have risen or fallen with market conditions, many industry investors deem presentations of operating results for real estate companies that use historical cost accounting to be insufficient by themselves. For that reason, the Company considers FFO, normalized FFO, FAD and normalized FAD to be appropriate supplemental measures of operating performance of an equity REIT. In particular, the Company believes that normalized FFO is useful because it allows investors, analysts and Company management to compare the Company’s operating performance to the operating performance of other real estate companies and between periods on a consistent basis without having to account for differences caused by non-recurring items and other non-operational events such as transactions and litigation. In some cases, the Company provides information about identified non-cash components of FFO and normalized FFO because it allows investors, analysts and Company management to assess the impact of those items on the Company’s financial results. The Company uses the NAREIT definition of FFO. NAREIT defines FFO as net income attributable to common stockholders (computed in accordance with GAAP) excluding gains or losses from sales of real estate property, including gain (or loss) on re-measurement of equity method investments, and impairment write-downs of depreciable real estate, plus real estate depreciation and amortization, and after adjustments for unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures. Adjustments for unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures will be calculated to reflect FFO on the same basis. The Company defines normalized FFO as FFO excluding the following income and expense items (which may be recurring in nature): (a) merger-related costs and expenses, including amortization of intangibles, transition and integration expenses, and deal costs and expenses, including expenses and recoveries relating to acquisition lawsuits; (b) the impact of any expenses related to asset impairment and valuation allowances, the write-off of unamortized deferred financing fees, or additional costs, expenses, discounts, make-whole payments, penalties or premiums incurred as a result of early retirement or payment of the Company’s debt; (c) the non-cash effect of income tax benefits or expenses, the non-cash impact of changes to the Company’s executive equity compensation plan and derivative transactions that have non-cash mark-to-market impacts on the Company’s income statement; (d) the financial impact of contingent consideration, severance-related costs and charitable donations made to the Ventas Charitable Foundation; (e) gains and losses for non-operational foreign currency hedge agreements and changes in the fair value of financial instruments; (f) gains and losses on non-real estate dispositions and other unusual items related to unconsolidated entities; and (g) expenses related to the re-audit and re-review in 2014 of the Company’s historical financial statements and related matters. Normalized FAD represents normalized FFO excluding non-cash components, straight-line rental adjustments and deducting capital expenditures, including tenant allowances and leasing commissions. FAD represents normalized FAD after subtracting merger-related expenses, deal costs and re-audit costs and unusual items related to unconsolidated entities. FFO, normalized FFO, FAD and normalized FAD presented herein may not be identical to those presented by other real estate companies due to the fact that not all real estate companies use the same definitions. FFO, normalized FFO, FAD and normalized FAD should not be considered as alternatives to net income or income from continuing operations (both determined in accordance with GAAP) as indicators of the Company’s financial performance or as alternatives to cash flow from operating activities (determined in accordance with GAAP) as measures of the Company’s liquidity, nor are they necessarily indicative of sufficient cash flow to fund all of the Company’s needs. The Company believes that income from continuing operations is the most comparable GAAP measure because it provides insight into the Company’s continuing operations. The Company believes that in order to facilitate a clear understanding of the consolidated historical operating results of the Company, FFO, normalized FFO, FAD and normalized FAD should be examined in conjunction with net income and income from continuing operations as presented elsewhere herein. Click here to subscribe to Mobile Alerts for Ventas, Inc.


Global Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) market competition by top manufacturers, with production, price, revenue (value) and market share for each manufacturer; the top players including Request a Sample Report @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/1249833-global-chemical-enhanced-oil-recovery-eor-market-research-report-2017 Geographically, this report is segmented into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue (million USD), market share and growth rate of Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), covering North America Europe China Japan Southeast Asia India On the basis of product, this report displays the production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, primarily split into Polymer Flooding Surfactant Flooding Alkaline Flooding Micellar Flooding Other On the basis on the end users/applications, this report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, consumption (sales), market share and growth rate of Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) for each application, including Onshore Offshore Global Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Market Research Report 2017 1 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) 1.2 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Segment by Type (Product Category) 1.2.1 Global Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Production and CAGR (%) Comparison by Type (Product Category) (2012-2022) 1.2.2 Global Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Production Market Share by Type (Product Category) in 2016 1.2.3 Polymer Flooding 1.2.4 Surfactant Flooding 1.2.5 Alkaline Flooding 1.2.6 Micellar Flooding 1.2.7 Other 1.3 Global Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Segment by Application 1.3.1 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Consumption (Sales) Comparison by Application (2012-2022) 1.3.2 Onshore 1.3.3 Offshore 1.4 Global Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Market by Region (2012-2022) 1.4.1 Global Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Market Size (Value) and CAGR (%) Comparison by Region (2012-2022) 1.4.2 North America Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.3 Europe Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.4 China Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.5 Japan Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.6 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.7 India Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) (2012-2022) 1.5.1 Global Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Revenue Status and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.5.2 Global Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Capacity, Production Status and Outlook (2012-2022) 7 Global Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 BASF 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.1.2 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Product Category, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Product A 7.1.2.2 Product B 7.1.3 BASF Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 Huntsman 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.2.2 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Product Category, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Product A 7.2.2.2 Product B 7.2.3 Huntsman Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 Kemira 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.3.2 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Product Category, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Product A 7.3.2.2 Product B 7.3.3 Kemira Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 Sasol 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.4.2 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Product Category, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Product A 7.4.2.2 Product B 7.4.3 Sasol Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 DuPont 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.5.2 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Product Category, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Product A 7.5.2.2 Product B 7.5.3 DuPont Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 Shandong Polymer 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.6.2 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Product Category, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Product A 7.6.2.2 Product B 7.6.3 Shandong Polymer Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.7 SNF Group 7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.7.2 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Product Category, Application and Specification 7.7.2.1 Product A 7.7.2.2 Product B 7.7.3 SNF Group Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.8 Solvay 7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.8.2 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Product Category, Application and Specification 7.8.2.1 Product A 7.8.2.2 Product B 7.8.3 Solvay Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.9 Surtek 7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.9.2 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Product Category, Application and Specification 7.9.2.1 Product A 7.9.2.2 Product B 7.9.3 Surtek Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.10 Tiorco 7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.10.2 Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Product Category, Application and Specification 7.10.2.1 Product A 7.10.2.2 Product B 7.10.3 Tiorco Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.11 Baker Hughes 7.12 Halliburton 7.13 Schlumberger Limited For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/1249833-global-chemical-enhanced-oil-recovery-eor-market-research-report-2017


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fitch Ratings has assigned a 'BBB' rating to the following bonds expected to be issued on behalf of Miami Jewish Health System, Inc. (Miami Jewish): The bonds are expected to be issued as fixed rate via negotiation the week of Dec. 12, 2016. The bonds are secured by a pledge of gross revenues and a mortgage on certain property of the obligated group (OG) and a debt service reserve fund. WIDE ARRAY OF ELDERLY SERVICES: Miami Jewish provides a unique array of services for the elderly, drawing from a fairly geographically limited service area in Miami-Dade County. System components include a large skilled nursing (SNF) component, a growing Program for All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) network, an independent and assisted living facility, a small acute care and rehab component, clinics and management of HUD Section 202 housing. CHALLENGING PAYOR MIX: While the organization's payor mix is heavily skewed towards governmental sources, with 68% combined Medicare and Medicaid, the risk is somewhat offset by the significant revenues from the PACE program, which is capitated. All of the ILU's and ALU's are private pay and a planned future sizeable expansion of the memory care program will also be all private pay. GOOD COVERAGE/ MODERATE LEVERAGE: Pro-forma maximum annual debt service (MADS) of $3.1 million equates to a modest 2.9% of fiscal 2016 revenues which Miami Jewish covered at a solid 3.3x on a historical pro-forma basis. ADEQUATE LIQUIDITY: Unrestricted cash and investments of $48.4 million at Sept. 30, 2016 equated to 160 days cash on hand (DCOH) and cash was equal to 97% of pro-forma debt. Miami Jewish's liquidity metrics are adequate and reflective of its business lines- rental senior housing, skilled nursing and PACE. Additionally, management is focused on maintaining cash reserves and any major expansion plan would be dependent on raising a majority of needed funds from philanthropy. MAINTENANCE OF SOLID COVERAGE: Fitch expects Miami Jewish Health System to continue to maintain solid debt service coverage while executing its campus renewal and repositioning plan that will include expansion of its memory care program in the next two to three years, requiring significant fundraising. Failure to raise sufficient philanthropy for the project or a material decline in profitability impacting debt service coverage would likely result in negative rating pressure. Founded in 1940's as a 23-bed nursing home for Jewish widows and widowers, Miami Jewish Health System has grown into a provider of a wide array of senior services in South Florida. The OG consists of a 438-bed skilled nursing facility, one of the largest in the Southeast, a rental 95 unit independent living (ILU) and 81 unit assisted living (ALU) and 19 memory care facility and a small 32-bed acute care hospital, mostly catering to the needs of the Miami Jewish residents, all located on the system's main campus in Miami, and a Foundation. Additionally the OG operates a large PACE program with four centers serving providing care to 550 participants. The main entities outside of the OG include the Wolf/Cypen Foundation which operates exclusively for the benefit of Miami Jewish, as well as three HUD 202 apartment buildings providing subsidized housing for the elderly, and a nurse registry program. The OG represented substantially all of the consolidated system revenues and 80.4% of consolidated system assets in fiscal 2016 (year-end June 30). Fitch reports on the performance of the consolidated system. Given the unique composition of revenues and despite the presence of a small acute care presence, the medians referred to in the press release refer to Fitch's Not-for Profit Continuing Care Retirement Communities Rating Criteria (CCRC) medians. The management lead by the President and CEO with a deep experience in various for-profit sectors, appointed in 2008, includes several individuals recruited from the for-profit sector. His leadership has brought stability to the organization and the strategic initiatives being executed should further leverage the organization's core competency programs to further bolster profitability. Miami Jewish plans to issue approximately $45.4 million of series 2017 fixed rate bonds. Bond proceeds will used to refinance variable rate letter of credit backed series 2005 and a 2013 bank loan, fund $17.3 million of routine capital improvements, pay $1.3 million swap termination payment and fund a DSRF and costs of issuance. The 2017 bonds will have a final maturity date of 2031 and an average coupon currently estimated at 5%. There are no swaps outstanding. The bonds are expected to have level debt service of $3.1 million until 2033, when MADS declines to $2.6 million. Post issuance, the series 2017 fixed rate bonds will be the only debt outstanding, other than a $4.7 million draw under a $5 million revolving credit facility, which is interest only at 30-day LIBOR rate plus 1.75%. Because of the complementary nature of the services provided by Miami Jewish, several of the system components serve as feeders to its programs. The three HUD 202 subsidized elderly housing projects owned and managed by Miami Jewish generate referrals to its large and growing PACE program, which delivers comprehensive medical and social services to the frail elderly, most of whom are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid benefits and are reimbursed under capitated contracts. The PACE program accounted for 38% of net revenues in fiscal 2016, only second to the 44% of net revenues generated by the SNF facility. Miami Jewish is planning to increase its operations of the HUD 202 program by adding a fourth location and has been growing enrollment in its PACE program, which is a core competence and generates a solid return. The system's operating ratio averaged 95% over the last four years, which is consistent with a 'BBB' peer of providers with sizable SNF operations. Profitability is relatively light, with net operating margin at 5.4% in fiscal 2016, but improved over the average 2.3% in the prior three years. However, Fitch notes that the light profitability is somewhat mitigated by the increasing source of revenues from the PACE program, which generates operating returns well above 10% and the absence of real estate risks inherent in operating the residential facilities (ALU and ILU), which are rental only. Miami Jewish's pro-forma debt burden is moderate, as represented by pro-forma MADS representing a light 2.9% of consolidated system fiscal 2016 revenues. Historical coverage of pro-forma MADS was a solid 3.3x and 3.1x in fiscal 2016 and fiscal 2015, respectively. The consolidated system's unrestricted cash and investments totaled $48.4 million at Sept. 30, 2016, equating to 160 days cash on hand (DCOH) and cash was equal to 97% of pro-forma debt. Liquidity metrics as of the end of the first quarter of fiscal 2017 were materially improved due to the receipt of approximately $7 million of receivables from the PACE program related to fiscal 2016 services, but received following the fiscal year end. The OG does not include the Wolf/Cypen Foundation, which held approximately $6.7 million of cash and investments at 2016 fiscal year-end, but the foundation benefits Miami Jewish exclusively. Excluding the Wolf/Cypen Foundation investments, the OG's DCOH would be reduced to 138 and cash to pro-forma debt would decline to 84%. Fitch views Miami Jewish's liquidity position as adequate in light of its business lines and operating profile, which has no entrance fee refund exposure. Further, management is focused on maintaining system liquidity at the current levels and has stated that any major expansion plan would be highly dependent on the ability to raise a majority of needed funds from philanthropy. Of the new money proceeds in the series 2017 transaction, $17.3 million will be used for a number of projects at the Miami Jewish main campus. Approximately $8 million will be used for a construction of a parking garage, and the remaining funds will be applied towards renovations of three of the campus buildings. As part of its master facility plan, Miami Jewish is planning to develop a 99 unit memory care rental facility on the main campus, which would be designed using the 'neighborhood model'. The project is in early stages of development and has not yet obtained required approvals. According to management realization is 2-3 years out, during which time the organization would need to raise a substantial portion of the approximately $50 million estimated cost. Fitch has not incorporated this project into the current rating, and in Fitch's view Miami Jewish has limited debt capacity at this time. Occupancy of the large SNF has been consistently in mid to high 90%, most recently 98% in fiscal 2016, and the ALU and memory care units averaged occupancy of 90%. Miami Jewish has somewhat struggled with the ILU occupancy, which was reported at slightly increasing to 80% at 2016 fiscal year end from 76% in 2014. Aiding occupancy levels, the rental nature of the ILU units allows for renting vacant units to 'snowbirds' from the Northeast and Canada on a monthly basis. While there are a number of residential facilities in this market, Miami Jewish is the only facility that provides kosher food and thus appeals to a certain market segment. Management believes that there exists significant demand for the planned memory care facility, which will be instrumental in attracting philanthropy for the project. Miami Jewish covenants to provide quarterly statements within 45 days and audited financial within 150 days of the fiscal year end to the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board's EMMA system. Additional information is available at 'www.fitchratings.com'. ALL FITCH CREDIT RATINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CERTAIN LIMITATIONS AND DISCLAIMERS. PLEASE READ THESE LIMITATIONS AND DISCLAIMERS BY FOLLOWING THIS LINK: HTTPS://WWW.FITCHRATINGS.COM/UNDERSTANDINGCREDITRATINGS. 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As a result, despite any verification of current facts, ratings and forecasts can be affected by future events or conditions that were not anticipated at the time a rating or forecast was issued or affirmed. The information in this report is provided "as is" without any representation or warranty of any kind, and Fitch does not represent or warrant that the report or any of its contents will meet any of the requirements of a recipient of the report. A Fitch rating is an opinion as to the creditworthiness of a security. This opinion and reports made by Fitch are based on established criteria and methodologies that Fitch is continuously evaluating and updating. Therefore, ratings and reports are the collective work product of Fitch and no individual, or group of individuals, is solely responsible for a rating or a report. The rating does not address the risk of loss due to risks other than credit risk, unless such risk is specifically mentioned. 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Due to the relative efficiency of electronic publishing and distribution, Fitch research may be available to electronic subscribers up to three days earlier than to print subscribers. For Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan and South Korea only: Fitch Australia Pty Ltd holds an Australian financial services license (AFS license no. 337123) which authorizes it to provide credit ratings to wholesale clients only. Credit ratings information published by Fitch is not intended to be used by persons who are retail clients within the meaning of the Corporations Act 2001


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Rotary Senior Living is collaborating with Avera eCARE’s Senior Care Long-Term Care program to connect residents to providers at the Avera eCARE virtual center which provides around-the-clock urgent care. With a simple click of a button, this service brings a geriatric team and other specialty providers via two-way video to long-term care residents. This immediate access will provide consultative support on a resident’s condition or medication needs at any time of the day. When residents in long-term care facilities need health care services, Senior Care’s Long-Term Care program can help virtually connect residents to providers in remote locations, avoiding unnecessary transfers to an unfamiliar location. Rotary Senior Living’s use of virtual telemedicine services has been proven to decrease the number of emergency department visits and hospitalizations, by providing education and tools to help facility staff identify earlier treatment for acute conditions and gives residents easy access to urgent care services. “A second set of eyes on cases not only provides a deeper level of care for residents, it decreases the stress level of local physicians,” said Joshua Hofmeyer, Avera eCARE Senior Care Officer. “Residents have peace of mind knowing they have the entire Avera eCare team of specialists at their disposal, and doctors do, too.” Tara Behrendsen, Project Manager at Rotary Senior Living said the addition of Avera Senior Care takes our facility to the next level for offering innovative and cutting edge care. “The implementation of this telemedicine program is one more example of how our system is continuously pursuing clinical excellence,” said Tara Behrendsen. “This virtual support in addition to our experienced nurses and caregivers will provide a greater level of care to our residents.” Since 2004, Avera eCARE has worked to connect the vast knowledge of specialists to patients in areas without nearby services. Avera eCARE offers one of the largest telemedicine networks in the United States, supporting more than 300 health centers, clinics, long-term care centers, schools, and correctional facilities within a 13-state region. To learn more about Avera eCARE, visit AveraeCARE.org. Rotary Senior Living is a licensed 42 residential care facility (RCF) and a 46 bed skilled nursing facility (SNF) located at 620 SE 5th Street, Eagle Grove, IA. Facilities include apartments, duplexes, townhomes, and low income housing. The Wellness Center is a recent addition and provides out patient rehabilitaton and community fitness programs. Information on the services provided are available at http://www.rotaryseniorliving.com, on Facebook and by calling 515-448-5124.


Water soluble polymers are chemical compounds, which on account of their dissolving, dispersing and swelling properties, have number of applications in various end use industries. The wastewater treatment and oil and gas recovering industries holds major share in the usage of water soluble polymers in the United States. Moreover, different types of water soluble polymers are used in food industry, personal care products and pharmaceuticals, etc. However, expanding food & beverages sector, increasing water treatment activities in addition to boom in the shale gas recovery are expected to steer the United States water soluble polymers market. On the basis of types, US water soluble polymers market has been segmented into polyacrylamide (PAM), guar gum, gelatin, cellulose ether, and others (Including polyvinyl alcohols, polyacrylic acids and casein). In 2015, polyacrylamide held the largest share in the US water soluble polymers market because of its wide usage in wastewater treatment and oil & gas industries. Additionally, polyacrylamide is also used in paper and pulp industries. According to "US Water Soluble Polymers Market By Type, By Application, Competition Forecast & Opportunities, 2011-2025", the US water soluble polymers market is expected to cross US$11 billion by 2025, on the back of growing demands for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, increased oil and gas recovery using drilling techniques, pharmaceuticals and pulp & paper industries from different regions across the United States. The boost in the need for water and wastewater treatment, shale gas development in North America region, increased use of nutraceutical products in the United States on account of rising health awareness, and booming food & beverages sector in different regions of the country are set to increase the demand for water soluble polymers and their end use products in the United States. Additionally, development in the region's pharmaceutical industries coupled with abundant crude oil reserves on account of shale gas development in North America, government initiatives for infrastructure development in the region and growing food & beverages industry are set to increase the demand for water soluble polymers in the United States. Over the coming years, wastewater treatment industry would continue to dominate the US water soluble polymers market on account of increasing use of coagulants and flocculants. US water soluble polymers market is controlled by these major players, namely-Ashland Inc., SNF Holding Co. and Kemira Chemicals, Inc. in the United States. Other major players in the US water soluble polymers market includes Kuraray America Inc., E.I. Du Pont De Nemours & Co. and BASF Corporation. "US Water Soluble Polymers Market By Type, By Application, Competition Forecast & Opportunities, 2011-2025" report elaborates following aspects related to water soluble polymers market. Why You Should Buy This Report? The information contained in this report is based upon both primary and secondary research. Primary research includes interviews with water soluble polymers manufacturers and industry experts. Secondary research includes an exhaustive search of relevant publications like company annual reports, financial reports and other proprietary databases. TechSci Research is a leading global market research firm publishing premium market research reports. Serving 700 global clients with more than 600 premium market research studies, TechSci Research is serving clients across 11 different industrial verticals. TechSci Research specializes in research based consulting assignments in high growth and emerging markets, leading technologies and niche applications. Our workforce of more than 100 fulltime Analysts and Consultants employing innovative research solutions and tracking global and country specific high growth markets helps TechSci clients to lead rather than follow market trends. Connect with us on Twitter - https://twitter.com/TechSciResearch Connect with us on LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/techsci-research


— This report studies Water Treatment Chemicals in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering SNF Group Kemira BASF Solenis Ecolab Feralco Group CNPC Akzo Nobel GE Shandong Sanfeng Group Changlong Tech USALCO Ak-Kim Ixom Taki Chemical Aditya Birla For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Water Treatment Chemicals in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like North America Europe China Japan Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Flocculant Coagulant Oxidants Corrosion Inhibitors Scale Inhibitors Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Water Treatment Chemicals in each application, can be divided into Urban Water Treatment Industrial Water Treatment Oil and Gas Industry Global Water Treatment Chemicals Market Research Report 2016 1 Water Treatment Chemicals Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Water Treatment Chemicals 1.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Segment by Type 1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Water Treatment Chemicals by Type in 2015 1.2.2 Flocculant 1.2.3 Coagulant 1.2.4 Oxidants 1.2.5 Corrosion Inhibitors 1.2.6 Scale Inhibitors 1.3 Water Treatment Chemicals Segment by Application 1.3.1 Water Treatment Chemicals Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015 1.3.2 Urban Water Treatment 1.3.3 Industrial Water Treatment 1.3.4 Oil and Gas Industry 1.4 Water Treatment Chemicals Market by Region 1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.5 Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.6 Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Water Treatment Chemicals (2011-2021) 2 Global Water Treatment Chemicals Market Competition by Manufacturers 2.1 Global Water Treatment Chemicals Production and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) 2.2 Global Water Treatment Chemicals Revenue and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) 2.3 Global Water Treatment Chemicals Average Price by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) 2.4 Manufacturers Water Treatment Chemicals Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area and Product Type 2.5 Water Treatment Chemicals Market Competitive Situation and Trends 2.5.1 Water Treatment Chemicals Market Concentration Rate 2.5.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Market Share of Top 3 and Top 5 Manufacturers 2.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion 7 Global Water Treatment Chemicals Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 SNF Group 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.1.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Product Type, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Type I 7.1.2.2 Type II 7.1.3 SNF Group Water Treatment Chemicals Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 Kemira 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.2.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Product Type, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Type I 7.2.2.2 Type II 7.2.3 Kemira Water Treatment Chemicals Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 BASF 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.3.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Product Type, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Type I 7.3.2.2 Type II 7.3.3 BASF Water Treatment Chemicals Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 Solenis 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.4.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Product Type, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Type I 7.4.2.2 Type II 7.4.3 Solenis Water Treatment Chemicals Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 Ecolab 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.5.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Product Type, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Type I 7.5.2.2 Type II 7.5.3 Ecolab Water Treatment Chemicals Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 Feralco Group 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.6.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Product Type, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Type I 7.6.2.2 Type II 7.6.3 Feralco Group Water Treatment Chemicals Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.7 CNPC 7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.7.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Product Type, Application and Specification 7.7.2.1 Type I 7.7.2.2 Type II 7.7.3 CNPC Water Treatment Chemicals Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.8 Akzo Nobel 7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.8.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Product Type, Application and Specification 7.8.2.1 Type I 7.8.2.2 Type II 7.8.3 Akzo Nobel Water Treatment Chemicals Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.9 GE 7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.9.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Product Type, Application and Specification 7.9.2.1 Type I 7.9.2.2 Type II 7.9.3 GE Water Treatment Chemicals Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.10 Shandong Sanfeng Group 7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.10.2 Water Treatment Chemicals Product Type, Application and Specification 7.10.2.1 Type I 7.10.2.2 Type II 7.10.3 Shandong Sanfeng Group Water Treatment Chemicals Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.11 Changlong Tech 7.12 USALCO 7.13 Ak-Kim 7.14 Ixom 7.15 Taki Chemical 7.16 Aditya Birla For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com ABOUT US: Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports features an exhaustive list of market research reports from hundreds of publishers worldwide. We boast a database spanning virtually every market category and an even more comprehensive collection of market research reports under these categories and sub-categories. For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The SeniorCare Investor will host an important webinar— Seniors Housing M&A: The Numbers, the Deals and the 2017 Forecast —on Thursday, February 23, 2017, at 1:00 PM ET. A recording of the webinar will also be made available following its live presentation. The webinar is part of the Interactive Webinar Series. If you want to find out what really happened in the seniors housing and care merger and acquisition market in 2016, and the prospects for this year, this is the webinar for you. Every year, we release the initial statistics for skilled nursing, assisted living and independent living in this webinar based on our proprietary database of transactions. The panelists will provide their take on what happened in the market and what can be expected in 2017. Steve Monroe, Editor of The SeniorCare Investor and moderator of the panel, will pose relevant topics such as: Why the average price per bed for SNF’s continues to rise; he prospects for SNF cap rates for 2017 and beyond; Why the average price per unit for both assisted and independent living communities remained near record levels, and what we can expect in the future; How the AL and IL cap rates have changed and why and Who was buying and who was selling, and why. Our panel of experts will include, Arnold Whitman, Chairman, Formation Capital, Bill Milligan, President Ziegler Financing Corp. & Managing Director Corporate Finance Senior Living, Ziegler and Alan Plush, CEO, HealthTrust. If you’re interested in this topic, then you won’t want to miss the live webinar on February 23, 2017, at 1:00 pm ET, or miss out on the recording that will be available following the webinar. Please visit: https://products.levinassociates.com/downloads/1702b-webinar/ or call 203-846-6800 for more information about this interactive webinar.

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