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News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Denton Attorney David Bouschor has been elected to the board of trustees for Collaborative Divorce Texas. Collaborative Divorce Texas (CDT) is a statewide organization of attorneys, mental health and financial professionals that is dedicated to helping couples and families resolve their divorce and children’s issues in a less destructive process than the litigation process. David Bouschor is board certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization in family law.  His office provides divorce services including collaborative, mediation and litigation, as well as probate law and guardianship-related matters in Denton County and the Dallas-Fort Worth area. As a member of the board of trustees for Collaborative Divorce Texas, he will help guide the organization’s mission of providing value to its members through training, education and other resources and to promote collaborative divorce as the preferred method of divorce in Texas. “I am pleased to have the opportunity to serve on the CDT Board because I believe that this is the best way to handle the difficult challenges of a divorce,” said Mr. Bouschor. Bouschor is a graduate of the SMU School of Law. He has been practicing in Denton for over 25 years and is a past president of the Denton County Bar Association and one of the co-founders of the Denton County Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The playing surface at Colorado State University’ s new on-campus stadium will bear the name Sonny Lubick Field and feature an alternating pattern of two shades of green, it was revealed Monday when the field design was revealed to the public. Installation of the first sections of turf, manufactured by Shaw Sports Turf, is scheduled to begin next week, and is scheduled to be completed by early May. Based in Calhoun, Ga., Shaw Sports Turf is an industry leader in sports turf innovation. A brand new Shaw Sports Turf playing surface was installed in March at Tropicana Field, home of Major League Baseball’s Tampa Bay Rays. Collegiate stadiums using Shaw Sports Turf include Arkansas, SMU and Vanderbilt. “Synthetic fields represent the most consistent playing surface,” said Joe Parker, CSU’s Director of Athletics. “Shaw Sports Turf is an innovator, a market leader and a proven partner. We are excited to have their expertise engaged in our project. Shaw and their people deliver a state-of-the-art product through a quality service experience at an extraordinary value.” The field design features a darker CSU green in the end zones and for eight of the five-yard sections of the playing field, alternating with a lighter green for the primary sections of the field, including the 20-yard section of mid-field between the 40-yard lines with the Ram head logo at the center. “We had meaningful discussions with the coaching staff, administrative team, project consultants and others on campus as we refined and determined a design direction for the field,” Parker said. “We are thrilled with the outcome and look forward to seeing the field used in live action and on television.” Large block letters spell out Sonny Lubick Field in four places, in the immediate sideline perimeter between the goal line and 20-yard line at all four corners of the field. The MW block logo, in green and gold, appears on the 25-yard line in the southeast and southwest and northeast quadrants of the field. Sonny Lubick Field, as well as the new practice field will feature Shaw Sports Turf’s PowerBlade Pro system. The system features Shaw’s revolutionary Bolt fiber. Bolt is a stronger, more resilient monofilament fiber, featuring a lightning bolt shape which creates a stronger vertical axis that causes fibers to stand upright for less breakdown and increased durability. Bolt is specifically built for performance and to reflect light for a lower luster and more natural looking field. “Colorado State University, under Joe Parker and the entire athletics team, has demonstrated a commitment to having first-class facilities,” said Dave Lange, Territory Manager with Shaw Sports Turf. “These facilities enhance the educational experience for student athletes and the entire student body. As for the stadium and practice fields, we believe the quality of the field must meet the level of play and that makes our PowerBlade Bolt system the perfect match to make the Rams one of the premier programs in college sports.” The overall installation time is scheduled to span approximately one month. Shaw Sports Turf also will install the Rams’ new practice fields adjacent to the west side of the new stadium. That expanse will include one full field and a second field that will be split between an 85-yard lined playing field and a 30-yard by 30-yard “drills” area for the offensive line. The practice fields are scheduled to be completed by June 1.


(PRLEAP.COM) May 5, 2017 - Frontline Source Group, Inc. Nationwide Temporary Staffing and Direct Hire Staffing Agency , announced today the company has been named one of America's Best Recruiting Firms in 2017 by Forbes .® The nationwide staffing agency ranked number 32 on this year's Best Professional Recruiting Firms list.Forbes worked with firm Statista to compile the Best Professional Recruiting Firm list ranks of the top 250 professional search firms."What an incredible honor to be ranked number 32 out of 250 of the best recruiters in the country by Forbes," said Bill Kasko, President and CEO, Frontline Source Group, Inc. "This is a real honor for our company and our team of nationwide recruiters. The honor of being listed with Forbes is proof that hard work does pay off. Our team members are on the Frontline each day filling positions with our clients and finding new career opportunities for professionals nationwide. Working with each of our team members every day and seeing their results makes me proud to be a part of this team.."To conduct its research, Statista first consulted with sources including trade organizations and company databases, identifying about 4,000 recruiters in each of the two categories. Thousands of recruiters, employees who have worked with recruiters over the past three years, and H.R. managers then took an online survey asking them to recommend up to 10 recruiting firms (excluding their own). In total, Statista gathered 20,000 recommendations, and the companies with the most recommendations ranked highest.Established in 2004, Frontline was named Best of Staffing 2017 in both Client Satisfaction and Talent Satisfaction. This is the sixth time to participate and receive the award for Client Satisfaction and the third time to participate and receive the award for Talent Satisfaction. Frontline Source Group was also named to the Inc. 500/5000 List in 2013, 2014 and 2015 and named by Southern Methodist University (SMU) #76 as part of the Dallas 100.Frontline Source Group specializes in matching top talented professional candidates with companies for temporary, temp to hire and direct hire placement positions, primarily in the Accounting, Finance, Information Technology, Administrative, Customer Service, Call Center, Human Resources, Engineering, and Oil & Gas industries. Nationwide Staffing Services with Current Office Locations include, Texas: Dallas, Fort Worth, Arlington, Lewisville, Austin, Plano, Irving, Frisco, Garland, Richardson, Houston Galleria, West Houston, Downtown Houston, Katy, San Antonio, Sugar Land, The Woodlands; Tennessee: Nashville, Brentwood; Colorado: Denver, Denver Tech Center; Oklahoma: Oklahoma City; Arizona: Phoenix, Scottsdale; Illinois: Chicago – Corporate office: Downtown Dallas.


HOUSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--APQC, the benchmarking and best practices research firm, mourns the death of founder and executive chairman, Dr. C. Jackson “Jack” Grayson. He passed away peacefully on May 4th at his home in Houston, Texas, at the age of 93. Grayson spent his entire professional career applying quality thinking and methods to help improve organizations and society. With a zeal for life and quest for adventure, “Mr. Charisma” always kept his family and colleagues on their toes. He started setting the bar high in high school when he danced with Vivien Leigh at the gala premiere of Gone with the Wind in Atlanta while a student at Georgia Military Academy. Keen on exploring the world and all its wonder, Grayson completed his seven-continent quest in 2003 at age 80, with an Antarctica trip, and celebrated his birthday with skydives at age 75 and 90. “APQC has lost a tireless champion, a visionary genius, and an inspiring mentor. Jack’s early and sustained efforts to help companies in business, government, and education improve productivity and quality have enhanced the competitiveness of countless organizations for almost five decades,” said Lisa Higgins, APQC president and chief operating officer. “We’ll especially miss his passion, wit, and enthusiasm for both work and life.” Grayson rose to public prominence in 1971 when he served as chairman of the U.S. Price Commission under President Nixon. Though the price controls were widely unpopular, he earned national recognition from the press, business leaders, and labor for his transparent and fair administration and later for his work to remove the controls. During this period Grayson came to understand that productivity growth in America was falling and sounded the alarm about our sagging productivity, quality, and competiveness. In 1977 he made an unprecedented commitment to halting that decline when he founded the American Productivity & Quality Center (APQC), originally known as the American Productivity Center. Based in Houston, the organization initially offered productivity improvement training courses, established common performance measures, and conducted the first White House Conference on Productivity. At the same time, he sought to create a physical venue to connect mind, body, and spirit and co-founded the Houstonian Hotel, Club & Spa in Houston, Texas. “I vowed when I left government, I would do something to wake up the nation to the importance of productivity, but more importantly, to help improve it,” said Grayson in an interview. APQC was his answer to a dangerous economy—it was an initiative that would help improve American competitiveness. In the mid-1980s he recommended the creation of a national quality medal, which subsequently became the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. APQC and the American Society for Quality (ASQ) jointly administered the award in its first three years. In 1991 he and staff at APQC launched the International Benchmarking Clearinghouse to help organizations identify and learn from best practices and in 1993, the Process Classification Framework® (PCF), a business taxonomy now regarded as the most widely-used worldwide for process improvement. Later he and his team helped launch and usher in the concept of knowledge management in the mid-90s. “Few, if any, individual Americans have done more during the last 20 years to shape the country’s economic future for the better,” stated BusinessWeek of Grayson in 1990. For Grayson, it was simple: the words “can’t” and “no” simply did not exist. In 1997, at the age of 74, Grayson launched and dedicated the rest of his career to the APQC Education Initiative to help schools benchmark and adopt best practices. Grayson believed many of the same productivity and quality principles and process management approaches that apply to the business world could be transferred to the academic arena, specifically the K-12 education system. He retired from APQC in September 2015, just shy of his 92nd birthday. Grayson earned his bachelor's degree from Tulane University, an MBA from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, and a doctorate in business from the Harvard Business School. His academic career included professorships at Harvard, Stanford, Tulane, and Southern Methodist University (SMU) as well as business schools in France and Switzerland. He served as dean for the business schools at Tulane and at SMU, where he became known for instituting innovations in business education at both institutions. During World War II, he served four years in the U.S. Navy and fought in the South Pacific. In addition to his academic and public work, his career included being a newspaper reporter in New Orleans, an FBI special agent, a manager of a cotton farm in North Louisiana, and a member of an import-export firm. A lifelong proponent of constant learning, experimentation, and having fun, he was a single-engine airplane pilot, a racehorse owner, and world traveler, even setting foot on all seven continents. He authored many magazine and newspaper articles as well as four business books, including American Business: A Two-Minute Warning about the productivity slide against global competitors and If Only We Knew What We Know, co-authored with his wife, Dr. Carla O'Dell, about knowledge management and the internal transfer of best practices. Grayson was a CPA and a retired board member for eight major U.S. corporations. In addition to his work with President Nixon, Grayson served on two additional presidential commissions for President Carter’s Commission for a National Agenda and President Reagan’s National Productivity Advisory Committee. In 1973 he was honored as Wharton’s Man of the Year by the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2000 English research firm Teleos named him one of the 10 “Most Admired Knowledge Leaders” in North America. In 2003 the American Society for Quality (ASQ) named him as one of nine Distinguished Service Medalists. In 2006 the Cox School of Business at SMU created the C. Jackson Grayson Endowed Faculty Innovation Award for excellence and creativity in teaching and an endowed MBA scholarship in entrepreneurial studies, gifted by Bobby Lyle. In 2008 APQC and ASQ established the C. Jackson Grayson Distinguished Quality Pioneer Medal to honor individuals who have demonstrated leadership in quality areas in education, health care, public sector, and not-for-profit organizations. In 2016 he was inducted into the Hall of Fame by the Association for Manufacturing Excellence (AME). According to Grayson, of the honors bestowed on him over the years, he was most moved by the APQC-driven tributes. In 2015 APQC launched Founder’s Day, an annual celebration to honor Jack Grayson and the work of APQC. During the inaugural event, APQC renamed its amphitheater to be Grayson Hall—“dedicated to all those who come to APQC to learn, adapt, and improve their organizations and named in honor of our Founder Jack Grayson, who inspires and challenges every individual to reinvent their future every day.” In 2016 APQC introduced the Grayson Guarantee™, a defining guide for APQC and its team on how to live, work, and act with Grayson’s values at the forefront of every decision. For Grayson the benefits of productivity growth extend beyond business strategy and enhancements to the bottom line. “If you look at highly productive companies, you notice that people are happier,” he said. “They are more empowered and responsible and take pride in their work. This adds to the productivity and the well being of the people in the organization.” What worked for the individual also worked for the company and country, he believed. “Any life that is not productive is wasted. If you are not striving to continuously learn and grow, you are not leading a productive life. This is true for an individual, and it is true for a country.” A biography of Grayson's life, Freedom to Dream, Courage to Act: The First Nine Decades of C. Jackson Grayson, was released in 2014 to celebrate his 91st birthday. Grayson was born on October 8, 1923 in Fort Necessity, Louisiana. Grayson is survived by his wife Dr. Carla O’Dell, and his children, Christopher Jackson Grayson and wife Kelly; Michael Wiley Grayson and wife Siew Leng Toh; Randall Charles Grayson and wife Kerry O’Regan; and four grandchildren, Mckenna Nicole Grayson, Andrew Jackson Grayson, Clove Regan Grayson, and Annika Regan Grayson. He was preceded in death by his parents, Charles Jackson Grayson, Sr. and Daphne de Graffenreid Grayson; and his son, Daniel Jackson Grayson. A celebration of life service will be held at 11:00 AM on Friday, May 12th at Chapelwood United Methodist Church in Houston; a reception will follow in the Fellowship Hall. In lieu of flowers the family asks that contributions be made in Grayson's memory to Camp Augusta, located at 17530 Lake Vera Purdon Road, Nevada City, California 95959. For more details about Grayson’s life and his contributions to the growth of the American economy, please read his biography or share your comments about Grayson at www.apqc.org or @APQC. Editor/Reporter Note: Current and historical photography is available to support editorial needs.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A star -- as big or bigger than our sun -- in Pegasus constellation is expanding and contracting in 3 directions at once every 2.5 hours, the result of heating and cooling of hydrogen fuel burning 28 million degrees Fahrenheit at its core Astronomers are reporting a rare star as big -- or bigger -- than the Earth's sun and that is expanding and contracting in a unique pattern in three different directions. The star is one that pulsates and so is characterized by varying brightness over time. It's situated 7,000 light years away from the Earth in the constellation Pegasus, said astronomer Farley Ferrante, a member of the team that made the discovery at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Called a variable star, this particular star is one of only seven known stars of its kind in our Milky Way galaxy. "It was challenging to identify it," Ferrante said. "This is the first time we'd encountered this rare type." The Milky Way has more than 100 billion stars. But just over 400,900 are catalogued as variable stars. Of those, a mere seven -- including the one identified at SMU -- are the rare intrinsic variable star called a Triple Mode 'high amplitude delta Scuti' (pronounced SKOO-tee) or Triple Mode HADS(B), for short. "The discovery of this object helps to flesh out the characteristics of this unique type of variable star. These and further measurements can be used to probe the way the pulsations happen," said SMU's Robert Kehoe, a professor in the Department of Physics who leads the SMU astronomy team. "Pulsating stars have also been important to improving our understanding of the expansion of the universe and its origins, which is another exciting piece of this puzzle." The star doesn't yet have a common name, only an official designation based on the telescope that recorded it and its celestial coordinates. The star can be observed through a telescope, but identifying it was much more complicated. A high school student in an SMU summer astronomy program made the initial discovery upon culling through archived star observation data recorded by the small but powerful ROTSE-I telescope formerly at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. Upon verification, the star was logged into the International Variable Star Index as ROTSE1 J232056.45+345150.9 by the American Association of Variable Star Observers at https:/ . SMU's astrophysicists discovered the variable star by analyzing light curve shape, a key identifier of star type. Light curves were created from archived data procured by ROTSE-I during multiple nights in September 2000. The telescope generates images of optical light from electrical signals based on the intensity of the source. Data representing light intensity versus time is plotted on a scale to create the light curves. Plano Senior High School student Derek Hornung first discovered the object in the ROTSE-I data and prepared the initial light curves. From the light curves, the astronomers knew they had something special. It became even more challenging to determine the specific kind of variable star. Then Eric Guzman, a physics graduate from the University of Texas at Dallas, who is entering SMU's graduate program, solved the puzzle, identifying the star as pulsating. "Light curve patterns are well established, and these standard shapes correspond to different types of stars," Ferrante said. "In a particular field of the night sky under observation there may have been hundreds or even thousands of stars. So the software we use generates a light curve for each one, for one night. Then -- and here's the human part -- we use our brain's capacity for pattern recognition to find something that looks interesting and that has a variation. This allows the initial variable star candidate to be identified. From there, you look at data from several other nights. We combine all of those into one plot, as well as add data sets from other telescopes, and that's the evidence for discerning what kind of variable star it is." That was accomplished conclusively during the referee process with the Variable Star Index moderator. The work to discover and analyze this rare variable star was carried out in conjunction with analyses by eight other high school students and two other undergraduates working on other variable candidates. The high school students were supported by SMU's chapter of the Department of Energy/National Science Foundation QuarkNet program. Of the stars that vary in brightness intrinsically, a large number exhibit amazingly regular oscillations in their brightness which is a sign of some pulsation phenomenon in the star, Ferrante said. Pulsation results from expanding and contracting as the star ages and exhausts the hydrogen fuel at its core. As the hydrogen fuel burns hotter, the star expands, then cools, then gravity shrinks it back, and contraction heats it back up. "I'm speaking very generally, because there's a lot of nuance, but there's this continual struggle between thermal expansion and gravitational contraction," Ferrante said. "The star oscillates like a spring, but it always overshoots its equilibrium, doing that for many millions of years until it evolves into the next phase, where it burns helium in its core. And if it's about the size and mass of the sun -- then helium fusion and carbon is the end stage. And when helium is used up, we're left with a dying ember called a white dwarf." Within the pulsating category is a class of stars called delta Scuti, of which there are thousands. They are named for a prototype star whose characteristic features -- including short periods of pulsating on the scale of a few hours -- are typical of the entire class. Within delta Scuti is a subtype of which hundreds have been identified, called high amplitude delta Scuti, or HADS. Their brightness varies to a particularly large degree, registering more than 10 percent difference between their minimum and maximum brightness, indicating larger pulsations. Common delta Scuti pulsate along the radius in a uniform contraction like blowing up a balloon. A smaller sub-category are the HADS, which show asymmetrical-like pulsating curves. Within HADS, there's the relatively rare subtype called HADS(B) , of which there are only 114 identified. A HADS(B) is distinguished by its two modes of oscillation -- different parts of the star expanding at different rates in different directions but the ratio of those two periods is always the same. For the SMU star, two modes of oscillation weren't immediately obvious in its light curve. "But we knew there was something going on because the light curve didn't quite match known light curves of other delta Scuti's and HADS' objects we had studied. The light curves -- when laid on top of each other -- presented an asymmetry," Ferrante said. "Ultimately the HADS(B) we discovered is even more unique than that though -- it's a Triple Mode HADS(B) and there were previously only six identified in the Milky Way. So it has three modes of oscillation, all three with a distinct period, overlapping, and happening simultaneously." So rare, in fact, there's no name yet for this new category nor a separate registry designation for it. Guzman, the student researcher who analyzed and categorized the object, recalled how the mystery unfolded. "When I began the analysis of the object, we had an initial idea of what type it could be," Guzman said. "My task was to take the data and try to confirm the type by finding a second period that matched a known constant period ratio. After successfully finding the second mode, I noticed a third signal. After checking the results, I discovered the third signal coincided with what is predicted of a third pulsation mode." The SMU Triple Mode HADS(B) oscillates on a scale of 2.5 hours, so it will expand and contract 10 times in one Earth day. It and the other known six HADS(B)'s are in the same general region of the Milky Way galaxy, within a few thousand light years of one another. "I'm sure there are more out there," Ferrante said, "but they're still rare, a small fraction." SMU's Triple Mode HADS(B) is unstable and further along in its stellar evolution than our sun, which is about middle-aged and whose pulsating variations occur over a much longer period of time. SMU's Triple Mode HADS(B) core temperature, heated from the burning of hydrogen fuel, is about 15 million Kelvin or 28 million degrees Fahrenheit. Someday, millions of years from now, SMU's Triple Mode HADS(B) will deplete the hydrogen fuel at its core, and expand into a red giant. "Our sun might eventually experience this as well," Ferrante said. "But Earth will be inhospitable long before then. We won't be here to see it." Funding was through the Texas Space Grant Consortium, an affiliate of NASA; SMU Dedman College; and the Department of Energy/National Science Foundation QuarkNet program. ROTSE-I began operating in late 1997, surveying the sky all night, every clear night of the year for three years. It was decommissioned in 2001 and replaced by ROTSE-III. SMU owns the ROTSE-IIIb telescope at McDonald Observatory, Fort Davis, Texas.


The star is one that pulsates and so is characterized by varying brightness over time. It's situated 7,000 light years away from the Earth in the constellation Pegasus, said astronomer Farley Ferrante, a member of the team that made the discovery at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Called a variable star, this particular star is one of only seven known stars of its kind in our Milky Way galaxy. "It was challenging to identify it," Ferrante said. "This is the first time we'd encountered this rare type." The Milky Way has more than 100 billion stars. But just over 400,900 are catalogued as variable stars. Of those, a mere seven—including the one identified at SMU—are the rare intrinsic variable star called a Triple Mode 'high amplitude delta Scuti' (pronounced SKOO-tee) or Triple Mode HADS(B), for short. "The discovery of this object helps to flesh out the characteristics of this unique type of variable star. These and further measurements can be used to probe the way the pulsations happen," said SMU's Robert Kehoe, a professor in the Department of Physics who leads the SMU astronomy team. "Pulsating stars have also been important to improving our understanding of the expansion of the universe and its origins, which is another exciting piece of this puzzle." The star doesn't yet have a common name, only an official designation based on the telescope that recorded it and its celestial coordinates. The star can be observed through a telescope, but identifying it was much more complicated. A high school student in an SMU summer astronomy program made the initial discovery upon culling through archived star observation data recorded by the small but powerful ROTSE-I telescope formerly at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. Upon verification, the star was logged into the International Variable Star Index as ROTSE1 J232056.45+345150.9 by the American Association of Variable Star Observers at this link. How in the universe was it discovered? SMU's astrophysicists discovered the variable star by analyzing light curve shape, a key identifier of star type. Light curves were created from archived data procured by ROTSE-I during multiple nights in September 2000. The telescope generates images of optical light from electrical signals based on the intensity of the source. Data representing light intensity versus time is plotted on a scale to create the light curves. Plano Senior High School student Derek Hornung first discovered the object in the ROTSE-I data and prepared the initial light curves. From the light curves, the astronomers knew they had something special. It became even more challenging to determine the specific kind of variable star. Then Eric Guzman, a physics graduate from the University of Texas at Dallas, who is entering SMU's graduate program, solved the puzzle, identifying the star as pulsating. "Light curve patterns are well established, and these standard shapes correspond to different types of stars," Ferrante said. "In a particular field of the night sky under observation there may have been hundreds or even thousands of stars. So the software we use generates a light curve for each one, for one night. Then—and here's the human part—we use our brain's capacity for pattern recognition to find something that looks interesting and that has a variation. This allows the initial variable star candidate to be identified. From there, you look at data from several other nights. We combine all of those into one plot, as well as add data sets from other telescopes, and that's the evidence for discerning what kind of variable star it is." That was accomplished conclusively during the referee process with the Variable Star Index moderator. The work to discover and analyze this rare variable star was carried out in conjunction with analyses by eight other high school students and two other undergraduates working on other variable candidates. The high school students were supported by SMU's chapter of the Department of Energy/National Science Foundation QuarkNet program. Of the stars that vary in brightness intrinsically, a large number exhibit amazingly regular oscillations in their brightness which is a sign of some pulsation phenomenon in the star, Ferrante said. Pulsation results from expanding and contracting as the star ages and exhausts the hydrogen fuel at its core. As the hydrogen fuel burns hotter, the star expands, then cools, then gravity shrinks it back, and contraction heats it back up. "I'm speaking very generally, because there's a lot of nuance, but there's this continual struggle between thermal expansion and gravitational contraction," Ferrante said. "The star oscillates like a spring, but it always overshoots its equilibrium, doing that for many millions of years until it evolves into the next phase, where it burns helium in its core. And if it's about the size and mass of the sun—then helium fusion and carbon is the end stage. And when helium is used up, we're left with a dying ember called a white dwarf." Within the pulsating category is a class of stars called delta Scuti, of which there are thousands. They are named for a prototype star whose characteristic features—including short periods of pulsating on the scale of a few hours—are typical of the entire class. Within delta Scuti is a subtype of which hundreds have been identified, called high amplitude delta Scuti, or HADS. Their brightness varies to a particularly large degree, registering more than 10 percent difference between their minimum and maximum brightness, indicating larger pulsations. Common delta Scuti pulsate along the radius in a uniform contraction like blowing up a balloon. A smaller sub-category are the HADS, which show asymmetrical-like pulsating curves. Within HADS, there's the relatively rare subtype called HADS(B) , of which there are only 114 identified. A HADS(B) is distinguished by its two modes of oscillation—different parts of the star expanding at different rates in different directions but the ratio of those two periods is always the same. For the SMU star, two modes of oscillation weren't immediately obvious in its light curve. "But we knew there was something going on because the light curve didn't quite match known light curves of other delta Scuti's and HADS' objects we had studied. The light curves—when laid on top of each other—presented an asymmetry," Ferrante said. "Ultimately the HADS(B) we discovered is even more unique than that though—it's a Triple Mode HADS(B) and there were previously only six identified in the Milky Way. So it has three modes of oscillation, all three with a distinct period, overlapping, and happening simultaneously." So rare, in fact, there's no name yet for this new category nor a separate registry designation for it. Guzman, the student researcher who analyzed and categorized the object, recalled how the mystery unfolded. "When I began the analysis of the object, we had an initial idea of what type it could be," Guzman said. "My task was to take the data and try to confirm the type by finding a second period that matched a known constant period ratio. After successfully finding the second mode, I noticed a third signal. After checking the results, I discovered the third signal coincided with what is predicted of a third pulsation mode." The SMU Triple Mode HADS(B) oscillates on a scale of 2.5 hours, so it will expand and contract 10 times in one Earth day. It and the other known six HADS(B)'s are in the same general region of the Milky Way galaxy, within a few thousand light years of one another. "I'm sure there are more out there," Ferrante said, "but they're still rare, a small fraction." SMU's Triple Mode HADS(B) is unstable and further along in its stellar evolution than our sun, which is about middle-aged and whose pulsating variations occur over a much longer period of time. SMU's Triple Mode HADS(B) core temperature, heated from the burning of hydrogen fuel, is about 15 million Kelvin or 28 million degrees Fahrenheit. Someday, millions of years from now, SMU's Triple Mode HADS(B) will deplete the hydrogen fuel at its core, and expand into a red giant. "Our sun might eventually experience this as well," Ferrante said. "But Earth will be inhospitable long before then. We won't be here to see it."


SINGAPORE--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kulicke & Soffa Industries, Inc. (NASDAQ: KLIC) (“Kulicke & Soffa”, “K&S” or the “Company”), announced today its contribution of an automatic single-head semiconductor wedge bonder to the Engineering Product Development (EPD) Pillar of the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD). Wedge Bonder equipment is used in interconnect technologies in a wide range of power semiconductor packages and modules such as the automotive, industrial, renewable energy, consumer and computing markets. New applications utilizing wedge bonder equipment are emerging, and one such application is in the manufacturing of batteries for electric vehicles. A presentation ceremony was held on the same day at the SUTD campus where the equipment was on display with live wire bonding demonstration. Chan Pin Chong, Kulicke & Soffa’s Senior Vice President for AP-Hybrid, Electronics Assembly, Wedge Bonders, Capillaries and Blades Business Lines, said, “K&S believes in continuous learning as it opens doors to innovation and opportunities. As part of our corporate responsibility effort, we hope our contribution of the machine enables hands-on experience for the students, and inspires them in applying technology to real life applications.” Professor Yeo Kiat Seng, SUTD's Associate Provost for Graduate Studies and International Relations said, "SUTD appreciates Kulicke & Soffa’s generous support of the automatic semiconductor wedge bonder. This equipment will provide our students with the desired hands-on experience and skills training in chip assembly, packaging, IC design and semiconductor. SUTD’s partnership with Kulicke & Soffa will mutually benefit both parties as it will catalyze research to greater heights and value-add to the industry and Singapore economy.” Kulicke & Soffa (NASDAQ: KLIC) is a leading provider of semiconductor packaging and electronic assembly solutions supporting the global automotive, consumer, communications, computing and industrial segments. As a pioneer in the semiconductor space, K&S has provided customers with market leading packaging solutions for decades. In recent years, K&S has expanded its product offerings through strategic acquisitions and organic development, adding advanced packaging, electronics assembly, wedge bonding and a broader range of expendable tools to its core offerings. Combined with its extensive expertise in process technology and focus on development, K&S is well positioned to help customers meet the challenges of packaging and assembling the next-generation of electronic devices. (www.kns.com) About Singapore University of Technology and Design The Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) is Singapore’s fourth public university, and one of the first universities in the world to incorporate the art and science of design and technology into a multi-disciplinary curriculum. Established in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), SUTD seeks to nurture technically-grounded leaders and innovators in engineering product development, engineering systems and design, information systems technology and design, and architecture and sustainable design, to serve societal needs. Also in collaboration with Zhejiang University (ZJU) and Singapore Management University (SMU), SUTD, a research-intensive university, is distinguished by its unique East and West academic programmes which incorporate elements of technology, entrepreneurship, management and design thinking. Graduate opportunities include an MIT-SUTD Dual Masters' Degree Programme and an SUTD PhD Programme. (www.sutd.edu.sg)


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Davis, California, USA: The Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) has welcomed Maria Richards as the 26th President of the global geothermal energy organization, succeeding Paul Brophy. Maria Richards is the Southern Methodist University (SMU) Geothermal Laboratory Coordinator in the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences in Dallas, Texas. Her research is on geothermal resources and energy development. Maria’s previous projects include updating the Geothermal Map of North America, developing temperature maps for Google.org, and on‐site geothermal exploration in the Peruvian Amazon and the Northern Mariana Islands. Producing geothermal energy from oil and gas fields is one of her research goals, thus works directly with technology companies and the oil and gas industry to find overlapping opportunities. As an extension of this effort, she coordinates the SMU Geothermal Lab Conference, Power Plays: Geothermal Energy in Oil and Gas Fields. Another area of interest is using boreholes to quantify the extent and rate of climate change occurring by measuring the equilibrium temperature down the length of a well to see the direct impact of the surface air temperature on Earth. Maria and her colleagues recently completed a high-resolution shallow Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) potential analysis for the Cascades region of the U.S. Pacific North-West for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Other past projects include the SMU Node of the National Geothermal Data System funded by the Department of Energy, the Eastern Texas Geothermal Assessment, the Dixie Valley Synthesis, and the resource assessment for the influential MIT Report on the Future of Geothermal Energy. Maria previously served on the Geothermal Resources Council Board of Directors and was chair of the Outreach Committee in 2011‐12. She is also a Named Director of the 2015-16 Board for the Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association (TREIA). Maria holds a Master of Science degree in Physical Geography from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and a BS in Environmental Geography from Michigan State University. With the experience and dedication of its diverse, international membership bolstering a more than 45-year track record, the Geothermal Resources Council has built a solid reputation as one of the world’s preeminent geothermal associations. The GRC serves as a focal point for continuing professional development for its members through its outreach, information transfer and education services. For more information, please visit http://www.geothermal.org. Get your daily geothermal news at Global Geothermal News [geothermalresourcescouncil.blogspot.com]. Become a fan on Facebook [ facebook.com/GeothermalResourcesCouncil]. Follow GRC on Twitter [@GRC2001]. Check out GRC’s YouTube Channel [ youtube.com/GeothermalCouncil]. See geothermal photos on GRC’s Flicker page. [ flickr.com/photos/geothermalresourcescouncil]


Toyota, CRC Group, Akorbi, and Ricochet Fuel Honored with Top Awards from Women’s Business Council – Southwest On Thursday, February 2nd, the Women’s Business Council – Southwest hosted its annual Parade of Stars Awards Gala celebrating Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs) and Sustaining (Corporate) Members who go above and beyond to ensure the success of women-owned businesses. The biggest awards of the evening went to the Corporation of the Year and three WBEs of the Year based on revenue size categories. Frisco, TX, February 14, 2017 --( Toyota, headquartered in Plano, Texas, was awarded Corporation of the Year for consistently demonstrating a commitment to WBEs through purchasing practices and results. They have emerged as a new leader in supplier diversity in the southwest region. This award is nominated by WBCS member WBEs only. WBE of the Year under 5 million in revenue was awarded to CRC Group, Inc., a leader in mail services and security clearance processes. Founded by Patricia Rodriguez Christian in 2000, CRC Group provides corporate clients with streamlined business support in mail centers, copy centers, courier services, and office support services. Akorbi, offering global and multilingual business solutions in more than 170 languages, won WBE of the Year for the 5 to 20 million revenue category. Offering a full range of language, localization, and global marketing solutions, Akorbi, founded in 2003 by Claudia Mirza, was recently ranked as one of the fastest-growing companies in the Dallas area by SMU Cox Dallas 100. For the WBE of the Year over 20 million in revenue award, long-time WBCS member Ricochet Fuel Distributors, Inc. was the winner. Ricochet Fuel was founded in 1988 by Kelly Roberts and has since grown into a diversified multi-state fuel logistics company offering a variety of petroleum products, services, and resources to its growing customer base. “Congratulations to all of our winners who do an exceptional job in their respective industries while supporting the mission and vision of the Women’s Business Council – Southwest,” said Debbie Hurst, President of WBCS. For more information on the awards or to learn about WBCS membership, visit www.wbcsouthwest.org. About WBCS Headquartered in Arlington, Texas, the Women’s Business Council – Southwest (WBCS) is dedicated to increasing mutually beneficial procurement opportunities between certified woman-owned businesses, corporations, businesses, government entities, institutions and other organizations. With more than 1,000 Women Business Enterprise (WBE) Members and over 80 Sustaining (Corporate) Members, WBCS is in its 22nd year of providing national certification to women-owned businesses. WBCS administers the national certification on behalf of the Women Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) for the following states: Arkansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and north and central Texas. To find out more about WBCS, please visit www.wbcsouthwest.org. Frisco, TX, February 14, 2017 --( PR.com )-- On Thursday, February 2nd, the Women’s Business Council – Southwest hosted its annual Parade of Stars Awards Gala celebrating Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs) and Sustaining (Corporate) Members who go above and beyond to ensure the success of women-owned businesses. The biggest awards of the evening went to the Corporation of the Year and three WBEs of the Year based on revenue size categories.Toyota, headquartered in Plano, Texas, was awarded Corporation of the Year for consistently demonstrating a commitment to WBEs through purchasing practices and results. They have emerged as a new leader in supplier diversity in the southwest region. This award is nominated by WBCS member WBEs only.WBE of the Year under 5 million in revenue was awarded to CRC Group, Inc., a leader in mail services and security clearance processes. Founded by Patricia Rodriguez Christian in 2000, CRC Group provides corporate clients with streamlined business support in mail centers, copy centers, courier services, and office support services.Akorbi, offering global and multilingual business solutions in more than 170 languages, won WBE of the Year for the 5 to 20 million revenue category. Offering a full range of language, localization, and global marketing solutions, Akorbi, founded in 2003 by Claudia Mirza, was recently ranked as one of the fastest-growing companies in the Dallas area by SMU Cox Dallas 100.For the WBE of the Year over 20 million in revenue award, long-time WBCS member Ricochet Fuel Distributors, Inc. was the winner. Ricochet Fuel was founded in 1988 by Kelly Roberts and has since grown into a diversified multi-state fuel logistics company offering a variety of petroleum products, services, and resources to its growing customer base.“Congratulations to all of our winners who do an exceptional job in their respective industries while supporting the mission and vision of the Women’s Business Council – Southwest,” said Debbie Hurst, President of WBCS.For more information on the awards or to learn about WBCS membership, visit www.wbcsouthwest.org.About WBCSHeadquartered in Arlington, Texas, the Women’s Business Council – Southwest (WBCS) is dedicated to increasing mutually beneficial procurement opportunities between certified woman-owned businesses, corporations, businesses, government entities, institutions and other organizations. With more than 1,000 Women Business Enterprise (WBE) Members and over 80 Sustaining (Corporate) Members, WBCS is in its 22nd year of providing national certification to women-owned businesses. WBCS administers the national certification on behalf of the Women Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) for the following states: Arkansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and north and central Texas. To find out more about WBCS, please visit www.wbcsouthwest.org. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Women’s Business Council – Southwest


DALLAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--In a business climate defined by fast fashion geared to target the millennial shopper, MISOOK is creating a differentiated voice through their commitment to dressing the woman who is confident, successful and committed to being stylish rather than trendy. Owned by Authentic Brands Group, MISOOK is the exclusive apparel partner of Texas-based Ming Wang, which innovates with unique retail partnerships that have resulted in successful sales growth in both department stores and specialty retailers. Ming Wang has invested in innovations in manufacturing technologies, supply chain management, and retail partner support, which has set them apart from industry competitors. The company houses their operations and quality control in Dallas while maintaining a design and marketing team in their New York City showroom. The company has enjoyed remarkable business growth with MISOOK in the past year, with annual sales increases of 15 percent. In fact, they were recognized by SMU’s Cox School of Business as part of its Dallas 100, an award recognizing growth and innovation for entrepreneurial, privately-held companies in the Dallas area. One luxury department store has enjoyed several seasons of this successful partnership, including impressive sales increases and margins in the mid-fifties, percentages which are very rare in the industry. Their success in this strategy has encouraged the leadership team, with strong direction from Steven Wang, Director of Brands for MISOOK and Ming Wang, to create an even more aggressive revenue strategy for 2017, including projections for 20 percent growth over a 12-month period. “What we’re hearing from our retailer partners is that MISOOK is a safe business bet,” explains Wang. “The brand is consistent, reliable, proactive and service-oriented. And that customer-centric model helps our retail partner grow the same types of relationships and loyalty that MISOOK has enjoyed since its founding.”

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