SmithGroupJJR

Madison, WI, United States

SmithGroupJJR

Madison, WI, United States
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News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.enr.com

Design firms continue to ride a strong wave of success in California. The 95 firms that participated in this year’s Top Design Firms survey reported $4.87 billion of combined revenue in California during 2016—a 14% increase from the previous year. In the three most recent surveys, combined revenue in the state has grown by 33%. Firms with practices in transportation and other infrastructure are particularly bullish on the market.  Don Sepulveda, deputy national market lead, rail and transit for West Coast operations at Michael Baker International, notes that several significant tax measures have passed to provide funding for transportation projects in the region. In Los Angeles, for example, passage of Measure M in November will provide $120 billion to advance the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s long-range transit plan for the next four decades. “The Western United States is riding on a transportation boom,” he says. Michael Baker saw annual revenue rise 24% in California—to $120.1 million in 2016 from $96.8 million in 2015. Transportation work accounts for 19% of the firm’s total revenue. Kip Field, Southern California area manager for HDR, says his firm is also optimistic about Measure M projects, which will leverage funds from a half-cent sales tax increase that takes effect on July 1. “Funds will be immediately allocated toward larger infrastructure projects, including Link [Union Station], regional rail projects such as the Crenshaw Line, Regional Connector, Purple Line Extension, bus rapid transit projects and developments that are widely supported by the local community such as the LA River Bike Path and Rail to River Trails projects.” HDR, which saw annual revenue rise 7% in California last year, is currently working on the Link Union Station project for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. WSP USA is banking heavily on rail work in the state. Last year, it broke ground on the $2-billion Mid-Coast Corridor Transit Project in San Diego. And, WSP USA and partner Network Rail Consulting are responsible for program management, integration, delivery and operations and maintenance planning on the California High-Speed Rail Project, which is now under construction in the Central Valley. In Los Angeles, the firm is at work on the Regional Connector and the Purple Line Extension. Some firms are also eying significant opportunities in aviation. “We anticipate demand. The need to upgrade aging infrastructure will drive opportunities in our market sectors to continue over the next five to 10 years, especially in the aviation sector,” says Brent Kelley, principal at Corgan. Corgan, in association with Gensler, is leading design of the $1.6-billion Midfield Satellite Concourse at Los Angeles International Airport. The new 12-gate facility, which will serve as an addition to Tom Bradley International Terminal, broke ground on Feb. 27. Kimley-Horn, which is the lead civil engineering consultant on the LAX Midfield Satellite Concourse project, expects to see a steady stream of work as well. “We continue to be optimistic about the next several years ahead, based on the robust funding environment through recent local and state funding commitments to transportation and other areas of infrastructure within our areas of expertise,” says Jason Matson, Kimley-Horn’s California regional leader. Stantec has positioned itself to capitalize on a wide range of opportunities in the water sector. Last year, the firm acquired MWH, which helped boost its annual revenue by 62% to $340.3 million. “We see a continued interest and investment in water infrastructure throughout California,” says Alfonso Rodriguez, Stantec’s Pacific Region vice president. “Rains from the past year have transitioned many client discussions from conservation and efficiency to storage and flood planning. Stantec’s 2016 acquisition and consequential integration of MWH has been a good pairing with these marketplace trends, with the combined companies successfully winning project work.” Woodard & Curran also firmed up its position in the water sector through acquisition, adding RMC Water and Environment in late 2016. RMC had seven offices throughout California with expertise in integrated water resource management and potable reuse. Alyson Watson, municipal west business unit leader at Woodard & Curran, says the acquisition of RMC rounds out the firm’s water resources management portfolio. In the building sectors, some firms are also seeing big bumps in revenue. Bonnie Khang-Keating, Los Angeles office director for SmithGroupJJR, says that although some small to midsize offices are experiencing a slowdown in limited sectors, “the design and construction industry seems to be strong and resilient in Southern California.” SmithGroupJJR saw revenue jump to $82.06 million in 2016 from $59.29 million in 2015. “The economy will certainly slow down at some point, bringing with it the challenge of growth and recruitment in a competitive market,” she adds. Joyce Polhamus, San Francisco office director for SmithGroupJJR, says capital spending remains strong for both institutional and private developers in the Bay Area. “As new projects are completed in the city, we expect to see an uptick in office tenant improvement and retrofit projects,” she says. “Health care activity will likely remain steady as well, with a wave of backfill projects and continued growth in ambulatory, specialty care, urgent care and cancer centers.  The seismic upgrade deadline of 2030 continues to drive the need for replacement hospitals in the Bay Area, Sacramento and Central Valley.” Amy Williams, managing principal at HDR in Pasadena, also sees seismic work keeping the health care market steady for years to come. “The future of health care in America continues to be unsure,” she says. “Nonetheless, California Senate Bills 1953 and 90 are mandating facilities be compliant with state seismic requirements by 2020/2030. The level of national insecurity related to health care spending has caused a number of organizations to delay upgrades. At this point, time is the critical factor for compliance and a number of entities are moving forward with the necessary upgrades.”


Sunnyvale, CA, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- SmithGroupJJR has been commissioned by Spear Street Capital to design a new 145,500-square foot, three-story, Class A speculative office building at 221 N. Mathilda Avenue in Sunnyvale, California. The development will be constructed on a 4.3 acre greenfield site at the northwest corner of the intersection of Mathilda Avenue and West California Avenue, in close proximity to the Sunnyvale station of Caltrain, the San Francisco Peninsula commuter rail service. According to SmithGroupJJR lead designer David King, the building’s most significant design feature is the striking, custom 2,000-square-foot, laminated glass artwork that will span the building’s east façade.  Commissioned from artist Stephen Galloway, known for his large-scale public works, the artwork reflects the site’s history as an orchard. Inside, the unique design continues with floor-to-floor windows and industrial elements that offer an open, modern warehouse feel. SmithGroupJJR designed the facility to have a strong visual connection to the surrounding community. It is one of the first new buildings to comply with the Peery Park Specific Plan, which calls for updated design and planning standards for redevelopment encouraging Class A office and density. “We wanted to acknowledge Sunnyvale’s rich history by maintaining a large amount of open space on the site while simultaneously representing its dynamic future,” said Juhee Cho, Workplace Studio Leader at SmithGroupJJR’s San Francisco office. The office building will feature large floorplates up to 49,500-square-feet, a multi-level parking garage and ample outdoor amenities, such as a prominent deck and a private courtyard with an outdoor kitchen. Additional amenities include a third-level patio, bike repair and storage, lockers and showers, and public open space. The site also includes a 1,200-square-foot historic home, which will be rehabilitated as a multi-purpose conference/amenity facility for the future tenant. Slated for construction completion in the fall of 2018, the new office building is targeting LEED-NC Platinum certification. Sustainable design features include energy efficient building systems, architectural solar shading, water conserving fixtures, ample outdoor amenities, including public open space and green screen cladding on the parking garage. South Bay Construction is serving as general contractor. SmithGroupJJR is a recognized, integrated architecture, engineering and planning firm ranked Top 10 in the U.S. by Building Design + Construction magazine. The firm’s nationally recognized Workplace Practice has completed the planning and design of more than 60 million-square-feet of corporate, government, institutional and private development projects related to workplace environments and urban development. With 164 LEED certified projects, SmithGroupJJR is a leader in sustainable design. Spear Street Capital is a real estate investment company dedicated to pursuing select office investment opportunities primarily in the United States and Canada. The firm targets well- conceived and located properties that can succeed through creative leasing efforts, physical improvements, entitlement changes or realization of adaptive re-use strategies. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/1042b7cb-7018-490b-b0e3-0a1ffea3d213 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f19cda0d-40dc-47f0-8695-3f0b2043efd9


Sunnyvale, CA, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- SmithGroupJJR has been commissioned by Spear Street Capital to design a new 145,500-square foot, three-story, Class A speculative office building at 221 N. Mathilda Avenue in Sunnyvale, California. The development will be constructed on a 4.3 acre greenfield site at the northwest corner of the intersection of Mathilda Avenue and West California Avenue, in close proximity to the Sunnyvale station of Caltrain, the San Francisco Peninsula commuter rail service. According to SmithGroupJJR lead designer David King, the building’s most significant design feature is the striking, custom 2,000-square-foot, laminated glass artwork that will span the building’s east façade.  Commissioned from artist Stephen Galloway, known for his large-scale public works, the artwork reflects the site’s history as an orchard. Inside, the unique design continues with floor-to-floor windows and industrial elements that offer an open, modern warehouse feel. SmithGroupJJR designed the facility to have a strong visual connection to the surrounding community. It is one of the first new buildings to comply with the Peery Park Specific Plan, which calls for updated design and planning standards for redevelopment encouraging Class A office and density. “We wanted to acknowledge Sunnyvale’s rich history by maintaining a large amount of open space on the site while simultaneously representing its dynamic future,” said Juhee Cho, Workplace Studio Leader at SmithGroupJJR’s San Francisco office. The office building will feature large floorplates up to 49,500-square-feet, a multi-level parking garage and ample outdoor amenities, such as a prominent deck and a private courtyard with an outdoor kitchen. Additional amenities include a third-level patio, bike repair and storage, lockers and showers, and public open space. The site also includes a 1,200-square-foot historic home, which will be rehabilitated as a multi-purpose conference/amenity facility for the future tenant. Slated for construction completion in the fall of 2018, the new office building is targeting LEED-NC Platinum certification. Sustainable design features include energy efficient building systems, architectural solar shading, water conserving fixtures, ample outdoor amenities, including public open space and green screen cladding on the parking garage. South Bay Construction is serving as general contractor. SmithGroupJJR is a recognized, integrated architecture, engineering and planning firm ranked Top 10 in the U.S. by Building Design + Construction magazine. The firm’s nationally recognized Workplace Practice has completed the planning and design of more than 60 million-square-feet of corporate, government, institutional and private development projects related to workplace environments and urban development. With 164 LEED certified projects, SmithGroupJJR is a leader in sustainable design. Spear Street Capital is a real estate investment company dedicated to pursuing select office investment opportunities primarily in the United States and Canada. The firm targets well- conceived and located properties that can succeed through creative leasing efforts, physical improvements, entitlement changes or realization of adaptive re-use strategies. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/1042b7cb-7018-490b-b0e3-0a1ffea3d213 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f19cda0d-40dc-47f0-8695-3f0b2043efd9


"The construction progress in The District Detroit and throughout the city is remarkable, and we could not be more excited to see two buildings being topped out in two days," said Christopher Ilitch, president and CEO of Ilitch Holdings, Inc. "These celebrations represent a major step forward in our vision for an even more vibrant and dynamic city, region and state. We're proud to join with the ironworkers to celebrate these important milestones and recognize the tremendous efforts to bring these buildings to life." Led by Detroit-based contractor Brinker-Christman JV, the expansion of the Little Caesars campus is Detroit's first newly constructed corporate headquarters building in more than a decade and on track to open in 2018. Designed by Detroit-based architect SmithGroupJJR, the new $150 million, nine-story, 234,000 square foot building at the corner of Woodward Avenue and Columbia Street will help anchor The District Detroit's Columbia Street neighborhood. The state-of-the-art headquarters campus will have collaborative workspace that will help the company continue to attract, train and retain the top talent and franchisees needed to better serve customers around the world. The new space will provide the most modern infrastructure and technologies and world-class amenities to foster collaboration, innovation and connectivity necessary to continue the chain's rapid, global growth. "Expanding our world headquarters campus will support the growth of every part of Little Caesars, from our employees, to our franchisees, to our customers," said Little Caesars President and CEO David Scrivano. "As a Detroit-born and headquartered business, we're proud to work with the ironworkers, architects and contractors from Detroit and Michigan to create this iconic headquarters building for our global enterprise." Wayne State University Mike Ilitch School of Business to Bring Students to the Heart of the Action Detroit-based contractor Christman-Brinker JV is managing construction of the Mike Ilitch School of Business, also designed by Detroit-based architectural firm SmithGroupJJR — continuing the Michigan Made, Detroit Built successes in The District Detroit. The new building was made possible by a $40 million gift from Mike and Marian Ilitch, the largest gift in the history of Wayne State University. The Mike Ilitch School of Business building will open in 2018 and serve more than 3,500 undergraduate and graduate students. Its location at the corner of Woodward Avenue and Temple extends Wayne State University's campus south and closer to the heart of Detroit's business community. "This topping out is not just a construction milestone, but also a milestone for business education in Detroit," said Wayne State University President M. Roy Wilson. "Thanks to the generosity of Mike and Marian Ilitch, the next generation of entrepreneurs and business leaders will be educated here in the heart of The District Detroit and will play a vital role in the continued resurgence of our great city." The District Detroit will ultimately account for a total economic impact of more than $2 billion and create more than 12,500 construction and construction-related jobs in addition to 1,100 permanent jobs. The District Detroit is one of the largest sports and entertainment developments in the country. Located in the heart of Detroit, this 50-block, mixed-use development led by the Ilitch organization unites six world-class theaters, five neighborhoods and four professional sports venues in one vibrant, walkable destination for people who want to live, work and play in an exciting urban environment. Home to the Detroit Tigers, Detroit Red Wings, Detroit Pistons and Detroit Lions - The District Detroit represents the greatest density of professional sports teams in one downtown core in the country. The Ilitch companies represent leading brands in the food, sports and entertainment industries, including Little Caesars, Blue Line Foodservice Distribution, the Detroit Red Wings, Olympia Entertainment, the Detroit Tigers, Olympia Development, Little Caesars Pizza Kit Fundraising Program, Ilitch Holdings, Inc. and Champion Foods. Additionally, Marian Ilitch owns MotorCity Casino Hotel. Wayne State University is a premier urban research institution offering more than 380 academic programs through 13 schools and colleges to more than 27,000 students. For more information about the Mike Ilitch School of Business, visit business.wayne.edu. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/two-topping-out-ceremonies-in-two-days-as-rapid-progress-continues-in-the-district-detroit-300462304.html


Sunnyvale, CA, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- SmithGroupJJR has been commissioned by Spear Street Capital to design a new 145,500-square foot, three-story, Class A speculative office building at 221 N. Mathilda Avenue in Sunnyvale, California. The development will be constructed on a 4.3 acre greenfield site at the northwest corner of the intersection of Mathilda Avenue and West California Avenue, in close proximity to the Sunnyvale station of Caltrain, the San Francisco Peninsula commuter rail service. According to SmithGroupJJR lead designer David King, the building’s most significant design feature is the striking, custom 2,000-square-foot, laminated glass artwork that will span the building’s east façade.  Commissioned from artist Stephen Galloway, known for his large-scale public works, the artwork reflects the site’s history as an orchard. Inside, the unique design continues with floor-to-floor windows and industrial elements that offer an open, modern warehouse feel. SmithGroupJJR designed the facility to have a strong visual connection to the surrounding community. It is one of the first new buildings to comply with the Peery Park Specific Plan, which calls for updated design and planning standards for redevelopment encouraging Class A office and density. “We wanted to acknowledge Sunnyvale’s rich history by maintaining a large amount of open space on the site while simultaneously representing its dynamic future,” said Juhee Cho, Workplace Studio Leader at SmithGroupJJR’s San Francisco office. The office building will feature large floorplates up to 49,500-square-feet, a multi-level parking garage and ample outdoor amenities, such as a prominent deck and a private courtyard with an outdoor kitchen. Additional amenities include a third-level patio, bike repair and storage, lockers and showers, and public open space. The site also includes a 1,200-square-foot historic home, which will be rehabilitated as a multi-purpose conference/amenity facility for the future tenant. Slated for construction completion in the fall of 2018, the new office building is targeting LEED-NC Platinum certification. Sustainable design features include energy efficient building systems, architectural solar shading, water conserving fixtures, ample outdoor amenities, including public open space and green screen cladding on the parking garage. South Bay Construction is serving as general contractor. SmithGroupJJR is a recognized, integrated architecture, engineering and planning firm ranked Top 10 in the U.S. by Building Design + Construction magazine. The firm’s nationally recognized Workplace Practice has completed the planning and design of more than 60 million-square-feet of corporate, government, institutional and private development projects related to workplace environments and urban development. With 164 LEED certified projects, SmithGroupJJR is a leader in sustainable design. Spear Street Capital is a real estate investment company dedicated to pursuing select office investment opportunities primarily in the United States and Canada. The firm targets well- conceived and located properties that can succeed through creative leasing efforts, physical improvements, entitlement changes or realization of adaptive re-use strategies. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/1042b7cb-7018-490b-b0e3-0a1ffea3d213 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f19cda0d-40dc-47f0-8695-3f0b2043efd9


DETROIT, MI--(Marketwired - February 13, 2017) - SmithGroupJJR, one of the nation's leading architecture, engineering and planning firms, is pleased to announce that Tom Butcavage, Sam D'Amico, Mark Kranz and David Varner have been elevated to the American Institute of Architects (AIA) College of Fellows. The recognition reflects their significant contributions to architecture and society and achievement of a standard of excellence in the profession. The four from SmithGroupJJR will be among the 178 new Fellows recognized at an investiture ceremony at the AIA Conference on Architecture 2017, to be held April 27-29 in Orlando, Florida. Tom Butcavage, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C, is a SmithGroupJJR vice president and leader of the Higher Education Studio at the firm's Washington, DC office. He has spent the past 20 years as a pioneer in the programming, planning and design of award-winning and nationally significant higher education facilities across the U.S., ranging from instructional facilities and student centers to libraries and professional schools. Butcavage is widely recognized for his unparalleled expertise in law school design. He has led more than 20 law school projects, each containing a variety of spaces for specialized instruction, research and legal skills development. Among his most recently completed law schools are the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, American University Washington College of Law, George State University College of Law, and New York Law School - all which exemplify cutting-edge environments for modern legal education. Presently, he is leading the design of a number of new professional education facilities at the University of South Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Georgetown University. A frequent presenter at national academic conferences such as the Society for College and University Planning, American Bar Association and Association of College Unions International, Butcavage speaks on topics including the design of student spaces and maximizing student engagement through new facilities. He has served as a critic and lecturer at the Corcoran College of Art + Design and Catholic University of America School of Architecture and Planning. Butcavage is a graduate of Columbia University with a Master of Architecture, preceded by a BA in art history at Swarthmore College. His is a resident of Washington, DC's Shepherd Park neighborhood. Sam D'Amico, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C, is a SmithGroupJJR vice president and design leader for the firm's Health Practice. Based at its San Francisco office, he is now commencing his 35th year practicing architecture throughout the U.S. as well as parts of Asia. D'Amico approaches every project with a specific architectural response that integrates the client's culture, context and place. His design tenets include the integration of daylight, nature and art into the healthcare environment to improve the healing process. D'Amico has designed for world-class teaching institutions and national leaders in healthcare such as the University of California San Francisco Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente, and Barnes Jewish Hospital. Currently, D'Amico is design principal for a new medical office building and bed tower, part of a multi-year expansion program for Community Regional Medical Center in Fresno, California. His design of the new Robley Rex Veteran Administration Medical Center, a 1.2 million-square-foot replacement hospital to be constructed in Louisville, Kentucky, led to SmithGroupJJR's award of a prestigious AIA Academy of Architecture National Health Design Award, Unbuilt Category. Another D'Amico design, for the Fuwai Huazhong Cardiovascular and Heart Hospital, Zhenghou, Henan Province, China, was the recipient of an AIA San Francisco Citation Award for unbuilt design. At SmithGroupJJR, D'Amico is a member of the firm's National Design Committee. In 2016, he served as a featured panelist at firm's public forum on design, Perspectives, for a program titled, "The Fusion of Art and Architecture." A graduate from the University of Houston with a Bachelor of Architecture with Honors, the Houston, Texas native now resides in Lafayette, California, where he is on the Board of the city's Improvement Association. Mark Kranz, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C, vice president and design director at SmithGroupJJR, is known for his elegant and synthesized solutions for research and higher education environments across the U.S. As the designer of projects recognized by a total of 27 AIA design awards to-date, he believes that each has the potential for excellence, regardless of budget or constraints. Kranz, who is based at the firm's Phoenix office, is an advocate of pushing the boundaries of innovation and sustainability. He designed the LEED Platinum Energy Systems Integration Facility at the National Renewable Energy Lab in Golden, Colorado, leading a complex team and design vision for a high performance/ultra-low energy building later honored as R&D Magazine's "Lab of the Year." His design of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency Center for Excellence, located at Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam, Oahu, Hawaii, was the recipient of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) 2015 Commander's Award for Design Excellence. Among Kranz's projects currently underway is the $82 million Engineering Building, now under construction at the University of Texas at Dallas. Scheduled for completion in 2018, the new, 208,000-square-foot building will house the university's rapidly growing mechanical engineering program. He is also serving design principal for the new $60 million San Diego County Crime Laboratory, slated to be completed in 2019. Kranz was elected to the SmithGroupJJR Board of Directors in 2015 and is a member of the firm's National Design Committee and Science & Technology Practice. He is a graduate of the University of Nebraska in Lincoln with a Bachelor of Science in architectural studies, followed by a Master of Architecture from Arizona State University. He now resides in Phoenix. David Varner, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C, is vice president and director of the firm's 200-person office in Washington, DC, located in the 1700 New York Avenue building in the heart of DC's monumental core. Varner is known for his talent in discovering and celebrating hidden environmental, economic and design opportunities in existing buildings. His special expertise and success in creating new value for owners, communities and cities through such building transformation is well demonstrated with the complete transformation of the 2.1 million-square-foot, Constitution Center, a repositioning of a 1960's property into the largest, privately-owned office building in Washington, DC. Certified LEED Gold, the building today is not only highly energy-efficient, but secure, elegant and fully leased. Varner is currently serving as SmithGroupJJR's principal-in-charge for one of the District's most exciting new buildings now under construction: the $60 million, 150,000-square-foot, DC Water Headquarters. When completed in late 2017 along the waterfront of the Anacostia River, the new building will set a new standard for low-energy, high-performance and resilient waterfront development. As a result of his expertise in existing buildings, transformation, planning and mixed-use development, Varner is frequently invited to join interdisciplinary panels of some of the nation's most significant leadership groups. In 2015 he was elected a Trustee of the Federal City Council, a position that catalyzes the collaboration of key business leaders in Washington, DC to solve challenging problems across the city. He is a long-time member of the Urban Land Institute and currently on its exclusive Redevelopment and Reuse Council. Varner has been a member of the SmithGroupJJR Board of Directors since 2011. He is graduate of Rice University with dual degrees: a Bachelor of Arts degree in architecture and art/art history and a Bachelor of Architecture. A native of Houston, Texas, Varner now lives in Arlington, Virginia. The American Institute of Architects Fellowship program was developed to elevate those architects who have made a significant contribution to architecture and society and who have achieved a standard of excellence in the profession. Election to fellowship not only recognizes the achievements of architects as individuals, but also their significant contribution to architecture and society on a national level. SmithGroupJJR (www.smithgroupjjr.com) is an integrated architecture, engineering and planning firm, employing more than 1,100 across 10 offices. In May 2016, SmithGroupJJR was ranked as one of the nation's top architecture firms by Architect magazine's Architect 50. A national leader in sustainable design, SmithGroupJJR has 420 LEED professionals and 160 LEED certified projects.


« BASF licenses CAM-7 Li-ion cathode materials from CAMX Power LLC | Main | ARPA-E issues $30M NEXTCAR program funding opportunity; 20% reduction in energy consumption beyond current regulatory requirements » Ford Motor Company unveiled its plans to transform its Dearborn facilities into a modern, green and high-tech campus to foster innovation and help drive the company’s transition to an auto and a mobility company. The 10-year transformation of the company’s more than 60-year-old Dearborn facilities will colocate 30,000 employees from 70 buildings today into primarily two locations—a product campus and a world headquarters campus. More than 7.5 million square feet of work space will be rebuilt and upgraded into even more technology-enabled and connected facilities. The transformation will integrate sustainability and innovation throughout the built environment, including a new Sustainability Showcase building on the product campus, which will aim to meet Living Building Challenge standards, the highest level of sustainability certification today. To be certified under the Challenge, projects must meet a series of ambitious performance requirements over a minimum of 12 months of continuous occupancy. Among the key criteria is that 100% of the building’s energy needs on a net annual basis must be supplied by on-site renewable energy. No combustion is allowed. Ford’s zero-waste, net zero-energy, net zero-water Sustainability Showcase facility will produce more energy than it consumes, and will use geothermal heating and cooling and photovoltaic power generation. Although the Sustainability Showcase will embody the highest level of sustainability designs and practices, the entire campus—including remodeled and refurbished buildings as well as new builds—will incorporate sustainable designs, technologies and practices, many of them used or developed over the past 15 years at Ford sites. Throughout the two campuses, increased building insulation, new glazing systems, state-of-the-art lighting and daylighting, and heat recovery will reduce overall energy use in new buildings by approximately 50% annually. Overall potable water use will be significantly reduced through advanced water fixture selection, metering and process enhancements. Although Ford is pushing the envelope on certain elements, it is not razing the campus to start anew, Hobbs noted. The company anticipates all renovated facilities on both campuses will achieve at a minimum silver certification through the US Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design process. All new construction is planned to meet LEED Gold certification standards, including sustainable material selection and material ingredient transparency. The new buildings will have high-performance energy systems incorporating daylighting, solar orientation, natural airflow ventilation and heat recovery. An advanced storm water management system will capture, clean and reduce storm water run-off, while a greening of the site will include more planted areas and native species, a tree canopy and natural rain retention areas. The design for everything is not complete, but this will be a low entropy campus, minimizing energy wastage and creating a super environment. This is what we are going to do. We think we can justify it. There tends to be a belief that business decisions and environmental actions are mutually exclusive. Over the last 15 years we have demonstrated that we can present compelling arguments that make business sense and that benefit communities and stakeholders as well. SmithGroupJJR designed the new campus layout, applying inspiration from tech companies and university campuses. Designs incorporate the seven concepts of the WELL Building Standard, which look at how air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort and mental and emotional health impact employees. Overview of the transformation. A walkable community with paths, trails and covered walkways, the product campus will include a new design center, autonomous vehicles, on-demand shuttles, eBikes, new onsite employee services, wireless connectivity speeds up to 10 times faster than today and more green spaces. A second campus location around the current Ford World Headquarters building will feature a new Ford Credit facility and provide onsite employee services, improved connectivity and enhanced accessibility to the expansive green space that surrounds the building. Construction of the new product campus begins this month at the Ford Research and Engineering Center. The majority of work is expected to be complete by 2023. Major work on the second campus around Ford World Headquarters begins in 2021 and is expected to be complete in 2026. Ford has not yet released cost figures for the full project. Product campus. The current Ford Research and Engineering Center Campus—dedicated by US President Eisenhower in May 1953—currently houses 12,000 employees. It is being transformed into a contemporary, innovative work environment to accommodate 24,000 employees in 4.5 million square feet of upgraded work space. The campus also will serve as a pilot location for Ford Smart Mobility solutions, including autonomous vehicles, on-demand shuttles and eBikes to transport employees. The all-new, more-than-700,000-square-foot Design Center will be the focal point of the campus and include new studios and an outdoor design courtyard. The historic 14,000-square-foot Ford Design Showroom will remain and will be upgraded to be used as an event venue. Ford World Headquarters Campus. The current Ford World Headquarters building was dedicated in 1956 and reflects thought-leading architecture of that time. When campus renovation begins in 2021, care will be taken to retain the iconic image of the building while providing both exterior and interior enhancements. The new campus will include: All employees in the World Headquarters campus, including senior executives, will have better technologically connected facilities and open work spaces, creating a collaborative environment. In the near term, both Ford World Headquarters and Ford Credit facilities will receive updates to common areas, including a modern cafe at World Headquarters. When complete, Ford’s Dearborn campuses will complement the company’s state-of-the-art facility that opened in Palo Alto, California, last year. The company plans to apply best practices and space standards from the Dearborn campus project as it upgrades its other global office environments.


News Article | April 13, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

Last fall, the Ford Motor Company announced a $4.5 billion investment in EV and battery R&D, and now the company has upped the ante on itself. For the first time since the 1950s, Ford is embarking on a complete do-over of its product operations and global headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan, that seems aimed at soaking the entire company in EV culture. The effort will transition the company’s current roster of 70 buildings into two “green” campuses that will double as showcases and test beds for cutting edge mobility products, much of which revolves around EV technology and connectivity. And yes, Ford’s eBikes will be part of it. First things first — it’s true, Ford eBikes are a thing. In January CleanTechnica visited the North American International Auto Show in Detroit as a guest of Ford, which provided the opportunity to pepper Dr. Ken Washington, the company’s VP for Research and Advanced Engineering, with questions about Ford’s recent ventures into pedal-power. The answer was “very serious.” In fact, e-bikes were one of only two mobility solutions that made the cut for particular attention from Ford, after the company explored more than a score of other mobility options for marketing potential (the other area of focus is non-traditional/shared vehicle ownership). So, the new Product Campus will serve as a pilot location enabling Ford to test out its Ford-branded eBike in action, along with autonomous vehicles and on-demand shuttles. The Product Campus is also designed as an all-weather walkable community — an important consideration for chilly Michigan winters — so covered walkways are featured along with trails and biking/walking paths. Of course, for the foreseeable future, the bulk of Ford’s products will run on liquid fuel (fossil petroleum or biofuel), but the new Product Campus will pickle many of the company’s 30,000 employees in EV culture by focusing on sustainability. We’re calling it EV culture because after all, the whole point of the EV revolution is to make things better. Ford is extending that concept past simply reducing airborne air pollutants, to include overall health and wellness as well as new mobility options that have the potential to embrace populations far beyond the car-owning public. The new Product Campus replaces the 1953 Research and Engineering Center… That roundish building near the foreground sports a rooftop full of solar panels. That’s clearly not enough to power the whole campus, but it’s a start. The main sustainable energy technology is geothermal heating and cooling. Construction is beginning this month, with completion slotted for 2023. The other campus will preserve the iconic Ford World Headquarters building, but update its surroundings to encourage walking and biking. The company will renew its commitment to the 1960s era Arjay Miller Arboretum at the site, and focus on native plantings and more green space throughout. Renovations are expected to begin in 2021. Overall, the two campuses are not striving for the highest level in LEED building energy efficiency standards, most likely due to the unique demands of functional operations. However, the company is aiming for at least Gold certification, partly through energy savings: …increased building insulation, new glazing systems, state-of-the-art lighting and daylighting, and heat recovery will reduce overall energy use in new buildings by approximately 50 percent annually. Rainwater capture and treatment is also a main feature at both campuses, along with smart metering and high efficiency fixtures to reduce potable water use. Rainwater retention areas and lavish tree canopies are also part of the water management plan. With an eye on future improvements, the plans include a net-zero waste, energy, and water Sustainability Center that goes beyond LEED to meet the Living Building Challenge for net zero construction. The challenges of true net-zero construction can be daunting, and they include health issues such as indoor air quality. However, it seems that Ford already has a head start on ensuring that the wellness of building occupants is a major feature of the Sustainability Center. The designer of the new campuses, SmithGroupJJR, already has an impressive stock of green projects under its belt, and has incorporated the WELL Building Standard® into its design. Follow me on Twitter and Google+. All images: via The Ford Motor Company.   Drive an electric car? Complete one of our short surveys for our next electric car report.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Workplace design experts at SmithGroupJJR announced that the top-ranked architecture, engineering, and design firm has relocated its Chicago operations into a new 21,000-sf workspace on the ninth floor of the historic Jeweler’s Building downtown. Through an open studio and free address seating, the new space supports two key objectives for the firm. It bolsters the company’s market expansion strategy through built-in flexibility for growth and helps to attract and retain top-tier talent by creating a vibrant work environment. Offering a wide variety of enclosed rooms and various desking solutions, the firm can readily accommodate changing staffing needs. The transition away from fixed, assigned workstations reflects feedback from a space utilization study conducted at the project’s onset. Data confirmed that at any given time, 30 percent of employees had no need for a physical desk. This model allows the team, currently numbering 81, to grow up to 40 percent without adding additional square footage. Active project areas for impromptu collaboration promote the cross-pollination of ideas while designated quiet zones ensure a balance of focused work for the staff. The new space also creates a dynamic and flexible think tank, where interdisciplinary groups can investigate office trends and test emerging technologies that are transforming clients’ business models and real estate needs. “The worlds in which our clients work, regardless of the industry, are changing rapidly,” said Office Director Tim Tracey. “Our goal is to help them reimagine how they want to work in the future, and then design a space which supports that vision.” Therefore, it was essential that this new office “be a place where teams can ideate and test everything from ‘what if’ design scenarios to new devices that promote the latest in mobile work solutions,” Tracey adds. A centrally located makerspace provides a hands-on experience for enhanced design visualization. It includes 3D technology, which allows staff to prototype conceptual ideas and build design consensus rapidly. Moveable project pin-up space promotes flexible and efficient collaboration. Each team member has a firm-issued lightweight laptop that includes PC-based softphone applications for voice and video calls and other communications tools that aid mobility and seamless connectivity. SmithGroupJJR’s Chicago office is the first of the company’s nine domestic locations to pilot a concept where employees are open to select a workspace that best suits current activities and tasks. Staff may choose from standing desks, bench-style seating, conference and huddle rooms, and teaming areas with an array of reconfigurable furniture. A spacious lobby and café provide additional options for breakout or large group activities. For tasks requiring more privacy – or for individuals that prefer customary office seating – enclaves, phone rooms, and a handful of traditional desks have also been incorporated into the available options. Ample daylighting and unobstructed city views add to the energy of the office. The new environment better supports flexibility, interaction, and change – something the firm’s employees stipulated through surveys and user group meetings in the research and conceptualization phase. “Certainly, we are proud of the work we produce,” says Tracey. “But it was just as important for us to give visitors a feel for what it’s like to work with us, too. Our new space is a physical expression of our design culture: dynamic, open and transparent, and flexible.” SmithGroupJJR is a recognized, architecture, engineering, and planning firm ranked Top 10 in the U.S. by Building Design + Construction magazine. The firm’s Workplace Practice has designed more than 80 million square feet of corporate office space over the past 15 years. Recent notable projects include the 223,000-square foot Chamberlain Group Corporate Headquarters, a Duchossois Real Estate project, to be completed in Oak Brook, Illinois in December 2016; the new GoDaddy Global Technology Center in Tempe, Arizona; Plante Moran’s 104,000-square foot office in Chicago; and the $1.2 billion redevelopment of Ford Motor Company’s Dearborn, Michigan headquarters campus.


News Article | September 12, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

For its first 72 years as the nation’s capital, Washington, D.C., was a slave territory, and the five-acre tract on which the new National Museum of African American History and Culture sits once contained a slave market. So even before the ribbon was cut or the foundation laid, the building, which opens September 24, was already firmly rooted in the geography of America’s most inhumane and violent institution. Yet instead of sadness, David Adjaye, the museum’s lead designer, saw celebration. He knew all about slavery, segregation, and lynchings, as well as more current reminders of that shameful legacy, such as the killings of Trayvon Martin and other innocent black men, women, and children. But Adjaye wanted to capture a broader view. "I refused to see the African-American story as tragic," says the Tanzanian-born, British-raised architect. "Instead, it is an extraordinary journey of overcoming, and shaping, what America is." That idea was a touchstone of the building’s design; the $540 million, 400,000-square-foot structure is literally encased in the symbols of African-American triumph. From the visually striking exterior to the carefully designed exhibit-hall environments, Adjaye and his team—in collaboration with architecture firms the Freelon Group, Davis Brody Bond, and SmithGroupJJR—have created what he calls "a spatial narrative," by which he means that the building itself tells the story of the African-American experience. Located on the National Mall near the Washington Monument, Adjaye’s metallic, multitiered structure consists of three inverted box shapes that thrust upward. Inspired by Yoruban caryatids—traditional wooden sculptures of female figures found in East Africa that are often topped by box-shaped crowns—the design is meant to recall both the head wraps worn by many black women in the U.S. and hands raised in praise or prayer, a common symbol in African-American spiritual life. "I was fascinated with how these [shapes] were connected," says the much-lauded architect, who has constructed prominent buildings such as the Nobel Peace Centre in Oslo. "It was so uncanny to make connections between the Yoruba caryatid and modern expressions in black America. They became clues to the architecture of the building." The lattice exterior, which is made out of 3,600 bronze-colored cast-aluminum panels, references ironwork patterns created by 19th-century enslaved workers in New Orleans and Charleston, South Carolina—an homage to the skill and the unpaid labor of these craftsmen. Established in 2003 by an act of Congress, the museum is being overseen by founding director Lonnie Bunch III, a longtime Smithsonian executive. Adjaye, whose group beat out hundreds of other firms for the commission, was named lead designer in 2009, and construction started three years later. While the building was in progress, Bunch and his team—in consultation with historians and luminaries such as Oprah Winfrey and Colin Powell—amassed around 34,000 artifacts, mostly from private collectors. Ideally, the curators want to create dialogue and "complicate questions of race, agency, and history," says deputy director Kinshasha Holman Conwill. "The hope is that people will leave here transformed and wanting to learn more." That seems likely. During a preopening tour in June, when the interior was still essentially a construction site, the space exuded a solemn dignity. Workers wearing hard hats were guiding cloth-covered display items into various exhibition spaces, and the partially completed rooms were full of shipping crates and dangling wires. But things were far enough along to offer a sense of what the experience will be like. The overarching idea is that a visitor’s journey through the museum mirrors the rise of African-American people’s position in society. Exhibits begin three levels underground, where low ceilings and a lack of natural light create a somewhat claustrophobic effect. That heightens the emotional impact of galleries such as Slavery & Freedom, which displays a 16.5-foot cotton tower, artifacts from a wrecked slave ship, and two log cabins, including one that housed enslaved people on Edisto Island, South Carolina. As you move upward, rooms feature a lace shawl owned by Harriet Tubman, Emmett Till’s coffin, a plane flown by Tuskegee Airmen, and the original Soul Train sign. The exhibit halls are much more than just expertly curated trips through time: They resonate because America has still not decisively resolved the complex issues that make the museum so necessary in the first place. One of the most powerful moments comes about halfway through, when museumgoers arrive at a room called the Contemplative Court. This is the point where underground galleries give way to aboveground halls with high ceilings and picture windows, where the museum focuses on more-optimistic topics such as sports, music, visual arts, hair, and style. The Contemplative Court’s sunlit stone benches and soothing water feature offer a space "to reframe what you experienced and contextualize it," says Adjaye, who hopes visitors will sit for a few minutes and reflect on the nation-shaping hardships they’ve just seen. "Then you move on up into the light." Click here for the 2016 Innovation by Design Awards finalists and winners. A version of this article appeared in the October 2016 issue of Fast Company magazine.

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