Neston, United Kingdom
Neston, United Kingdom

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Fraga Veloso G.,Small Animal Teaching Hospital | Fraga Manteiga E.,Hospital for Small Animal | Trehy M.,Small Animal Teaching Hospital | Freeman A.,Small Animal Teaching Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology | Year: 2014

Septic pericarditis and myocardial abscess are rare conditions in dogs. They are usually caused by foreign bodies, penetrating wounds, systemic infections or extension of local infections such as endocarditis, pleuritis or pulmonary infections to the myocardial tissue. Here we report a septic pericardial effusion and myocardial abscess in a young English Springer spaniel presenting with a long history of pyrexia and lethargy. No cause could clearly be identified although a penetrating injury or dissolving foreign body was highly suspected. The patient was successfully treated with a surgical approach in combination with broad spectrum antibacterials resulting in resolution of clinical signs without recurrence of the infection. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Small Animal Teaching Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Veterinary record | Year: 2011

To report the signalment, history, clinical signs, diagnostic and surgical findings and outcome in dogs and cats with retained swabs, medical records of dogs and cats that were referred to four referral centres were reviewed. Cases in which a retained surgical swab was identified during surgery at the referral hospital were selected for further study. The signalment, history, clinical signs, diagnostic and surgical findings and outcome in these cases were reviewed. Thirteen dogs with retained surgical swabs were included in the study. Bodyweight ranged from 9 to 45 kg. The initial surgery was a non-routine abdominal procedure in seven dogs, ovariohysterectomy in five dogs and perineal hernia repair in one dog. Time from initial surgery to presentation at the referral centre ranged from four days to seven years. Treatment involved major surgery in eight of the 13 dogs. Outcome was excellent in 12 of 13 cases, one dog was euthanased.


PubMed | Small Animal Teaching Hospital, Taylor Monroe and RSPCA Greater Manchester Animal Hospital
Type: | Journal: Journal of feline medicine and surgery | Year: 2015

Rapid recovery from injectable anaesthesia benefits cat shelter neutering programmes. The effects of medetomidine, dexmedetomidine and atipamezole on recovery were evaluated in adult cats and kittens (6 months old).One hundred healthy male cats (age range 2-66 months, weight range 0.7-5.3 kg) admitted forneutering were randomly allocated to groups of 25. Anaesthesia was induced with 60 mg/mGroups did not differ significantly in age, body weight, preparation or surgical time. The time to sternal recovery in group MA (64 34 mins) was less than in group M (129 32 mins), and in group DA it was less than in group D (54 6 mins vs 110 27 mins) (P <0.001). There were no differences in duration of recovery to sternal recumbency between groups M and D or MA and DA. The time to standing in group MA (79 51 mins) was less than in group M (150 38 mins) (P <0.001), and in group DA it was less than in group D (70 22 mins vs 126 27 mins) (P <0.01). Time to standing in group D (126 27 mins) was less than in group M (150 38 mins) (P <0.05). Time to standing in groups DA and MA were not different. Kittens recovered faster than adults after atipamezole. Minimal adverse effects were seen.Atipamezole reliably reduced recovery time after anaesthesia incorporating either dexmedetomidine or medetomidine; however, the choice of dexmedetomidine or medetomidine had little effect. Recovery was faster in kittens.


PubMed | Small Animal Teaching Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of small animal practice | Year: 2013

To determine the computed tomographic stage of dogs with nasal tumours in a UK referral population, and whether stage, time to referral and treatment correlates with outcome.Retrospective review of clinical records and computed tomography scans of dogs with nasal tumours.Dogs (n=78) presented to a referral practice in the UK with suspected nasal tumours are presented with more late stage tumours than dogs in the USA and Japan. Length of time from initial presentation to referral did not correlate with tumour stage at diagnosis. Median survival times for radiotherapy-treated dogs in this population are equivalent to those previously reported for late stage nasal tumours.Dogs with nasal tumours are presented late in the course of disease in the North West of England. Dogs with clinical signs consistent with a nasal tumour should have timely imaging and biopsy, in order to make prompt treatment decisions. Although survival times are comparable with previous reports and radiotherapy is a valid treatment option for dogs with late stage disease, better outcomes are likely to be achievable with earlier treatment.

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