Small Animal Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Groups

High Peak, United Kingdom

Small Animal Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Groups

High Peak, United Kingdom
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Parsons B.N.,Small Animal Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Groups | Williams N.J.,Small Animal Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Groups | Pinchbeck G.L.,Small Animal Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Groups | Christley R.M.,Small Animal Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Groups | And 3 more authors.
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2011

Dog ownership is considered a risk factor for campylobacteriosis in humans. This study investigated the prevalence and shedding of Campylobacter spp. in kennelled dogs. Faecal samples (n= 399) were collected in longitudinal studies from 52 dogs in two kennels. Campylobacter spp. were isolated using charcoal-based selective agars and direct PCR. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in dogs in boarding kennels ranged from 46% (95% CI 22, 72) on entry, to 50% (95% CI 30, 70) overall, and in dogs in 'rescue' kennels from 68% (95% CI 49, 84) on entry to 73% (95%, CI 56, 87) overall. C. upsaliensis was isolated from 62% (95% CI 48, 73) of the dogs, whilst C. jejuni was isolated from 15% (95% CI 7, 26) of animals. The majority of infected dogs entered the kennels already carrying Campylobacter spp., and remained infected throughout their stay. However, in some cases, shedding appeared to commence after kennelling. Given that the prevalence of C. upsaliensis and C. jejuni was relatively high in dogs from both boarding and rescue kennels, such animals may pose a zoonotic risk. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Parsons B.N.,Small Animal Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Groups | Porter C.J.,Small Animal Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Groups | Ryvar R.,Small Animal Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Groups | Stavisky J.,Small Animal Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Groups | And 9 more authors.
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2010

Campylobacteriosis is a major cause of gastroenteritis in humans and some studies have suggested that dog ownership is a risk factor for the condition. To determine the prevalence, species distribution, and risk indicators for Campylobacter spp. infecting dogs attending veterinary practices in UK, faecal samples were collected in a cross-sectional study from 249 dogs with and without clinical signs. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. was 38% (95% CI 32, 44), with Campylobacter upsaliensis accounting for 94 (98%) of the isolates and Campylobacter jejuni for the remainder. Multivariable analysis indicated that younger dogs were more likely to carry C. upsaliensis and the high prevalence of this pathogen supports the hypothesis that dogs, particularly younger animals, may be an important source of C. upsaliensis infection for humans. However the prevalence of C. jejuni, the most common Campylobacter spp. associated with disease in humans, was low (1.2%, 95% CI 0.3, 3). © 2009 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Small Animal Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Groups
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Veterinary journal (London, England : 1997) | Year: 2010

Campylobacteriosis is a major cause of gastroenteritis in humans and some studies have suggested that dog ownership is a risk factor for the condition. To determine the prevalence, species distribution, and risk indicators for Campylobacter spp. infecting dogs attending veterinary practices in UK, faecal samples were collected in a cross-sectional study from 249 dogs with and without clinical signs. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. was 38% (95% CI 32, 44), with Campylobacter upsaliensis accounting for 94 (98%) of the isolates and Campylobacter jejuni for the remainder. Multivariable analysis indicated that younger dogs were more likely to carry C. upsaliensis and the high prevalence of this pathogen supports the hypothesis that dogs, particularly younger animals, may be an important source of C. upsaliensis infection for humans. However the prevalence of C. jejuni, the most common Campylobacter spp. associated with disease in humans, was low (1.2%, 95% CI 0.3, 3).

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