Sm Della Misericordia Hospital

Rovigo, Italy

Sm Della Misericordia Hospital

Rovigo, Italy

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Scialpi M.,Sm Della Misericordia Hospital | Palumbo B.,University of Perugia | Pierotti L.,Sm Della Misericordia Hospital | Gravante S.,Sm Della Misericordia Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Anticancer Research | Year: 2014

Aim: To assess the diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose of split-bolus multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) protocol in the detection and characterization of focal liver lesions in oncologic patients. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed triphasic CT at initial diagnosis and follow-up split-bolus 64-detector row CT protocol in 48 oncologic patients with focal liver lesions. Split-bolus MDCT protocol by i.v. injection of two boli of contrast medium combines hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and hepatic enhancement during portal venous phase (PVP) in a single pass. First bolus: 75-90 mL at 2.0 mL/sec to obtain adequate hepatic enhancement during the PVP; second bolus: 60 mL/sec at 3.5 mL/sec to ensure HAP. Each bolus is followed by 20 mL of saline solution at the same flow rate. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of split-bolus MDCT protocol were calculated for detection and characterization of liver lesions. The effective radiation dose (ED) was calculated using doselength product (DLP) values in mSv determined using a conversion factor. Results: compared to triphasic-MDCT, split-bolus MDCT protocol confirmed all the 210 lesions identified and characterized by triphasic-MDCT technique, unchanged during the follow-up. The mean ED was 27.8±6 mSv for chest-abdomen-pelvis biphasic split-bolus MDCT and 45.7±13.6 mSv for triphasic-MDCT. Conclusion: The diagnostic efficacy of split-bolus protocol is comparable to that of triphasic protocol at MDCT with a reduction in radiation dose of approximately 35-40%. © 2014, International Institute of Anticancer Research. All rights reserved.


La Starza R.,University of Perugia | Nofrini V.,University of Perugia | Pierini T.,University of Perugia | Pierini V.,University of Perugia | And 7 more authors.
Pediatric Blood and Cancer | Year: 2015

Distinguishing between alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is crucial because treatment and prognosis are different. We describe a case of paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), which was classified as mixed ERMS/ARMS. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) detected losses of 3′PAX3 and 5′FOXO1, suggesting they had undergone an unbalanced rearrangement that probably produced the PAX3-FOXO1 fusion. Double-color FISH and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed PAX3-FOXO1, which is characteristic of high-risk RMS. This finding highlights the importance of supplementing histology with genetics so that atypical RMS is appropriately classified and patients are correctly stratified and treated. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Maffione A.M.,Sm Della Misericordia Hospital | Lopci E.,Humanitas Research Hospital | Bluemel C.,University of Würzburg | Giammarile F.,Center Hospitalier Lyon Sud Biophysique | And 2 more authors.
European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging | Year: 2015

Results: Pooled sensitivity and specificity of PET on PBA were both 93 %. Corresponding values for LBA were 60 % and 79 %, respectively. Areas under the summary ROC were 0.97 for PBA and 0.67 for LBA. Regarding aim 2, PET had a slightly lower sensitivity than MRI and CT on PBA (93 %, 100 % and 98 %, respectively) and LBA (66 %, 89 % and 79 %, respectively) but appeared to be more specific than MRI and CT (86 %, 81 % and 67 %, respectively). PET findings resulted in changes in the management of a mean of 24 % of patients. The mean incidence of PET-based EHD was 32 %.Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that FDG PET/CT is highly accurate for the detection of liver metastases on a patient basis but less accurate on a lesion basis. Compared to MRI, PET is less sensitive but more specific and affects the management of about one-quarter of patients.Purpose: The first aim of the review (aim 1) was to obtain the diagnostic performance values of 18F-FDG PET for the detection and staging of liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), the second aim (aim 2) was to compare PET and conventional imaging modalities, and the third aim (aim 3) was to evaluate the impact of PET on patient management. The incidence of extrahepatic disease (EHD) detected by PET is also reviewed.Methods: A comprehensive search was performed on PubMed/MEDLINE for studies evaluating PET and PET/CT in CRC patients with liver metastases up to June 2014. For inclusion PET had to have been performed prior to surgery, there had to be at least 18 patients in the study, and the reported data had to allow calculation of 2 × 2 contingency tables (for aim 1). A total of 18 studies were eligible for at least one of the three intended subanalyses including a total of 1,059 patients. Pooled sensitivity, specificity and accuracy and the corresponding 95 % confidence intervals were derived from the contingency tables on a patient basis (patient-based analysis, PBA) and a lesion basis (lesion-based analysis, LBA) for eight studies. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


PubMed | Sm Della Misericordia Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging | Year: 2014

The first aim of the review (aim 1) was to obtain the diagnostic performance values of (18)F-FDG PET for the detection and staging of liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), the second aim (aim 2) was to compare PET and conventional imaging modalities, and the third aim (aim 3) was to evaluate the impact of PET on patient management. The incidence of extrahepatic disease (EHD) detected by PET is also reviewed.A comprehensive search was performed on PubMed/MEDLINE for studies evaluating PET and PET/CT in CRC patients with liver metastases up to June 2014. For inclusion PET had to have been performed prior to surgery, there had to be at least 18 patients in the study, and the reported data had to allow calculation of 22 contingency tables (for aim 1). A total of 18 studies were eligible for at least one of the three intended subanalyses including a total of 1,059 patients. Pooled sensitivity, specificity and accuracy and the corresponding 95 % confidence intervals were derived from the contingency tables on a patient basis (patient-based analysis, PBA) and a lesion basis (lesion-based analysis, LBA) for eight studies.Pooled sensitivity and specificity of PET on PBA were both 93 %. Corresponding values for LBA were 60 % and 79 %, respectively. Areas under the summary ROC were 0.97 for PBA and 0.67 for LBA. Regarding aim 2, PET had a slightly lower sensitivity than MRI and CT on PBA (93 %, 100 % and 98 %, respectively) and LBA (66 %, 89 % and 79 %, respectively) but appeared to be more specific than MRI and CT (86 %, 81 % and 67 %, respectively). PET findings resulted in changes in the management of a mean of 24 % of patients. The mean incidence of PET-based EHD was 32 %.This meta-analysis suggests that FDG PET/CT is highly accurate for the detection of liver metastases on a patient basis but less accurate on a lesion basis. Compared to MRI, PET is less sensitive but more specific and affects the management of about one-quarter of patients.


In 2009, the Italian Society of Medical Oncology (AIOM) conducted a survey to describe the impact of regional pharmaceutical formularies on the disparity of access to eight new drugs among cancer patients treated in Italian regions. The survey documented some regional restrictions for some anti-cancer drugs. In the study, we analyzed the time to patient access to new anti-cancer drugs in Italian regions.In March 2010, we analyzed the availability of 17 new anti-cancer drugs at a regional level, specifically the coherence of regional authorizations compared with national authorizations approved by the Italian Medicines Agency (AIFA). In the regions with pharmaceutical formularies, we analyzed the characteristics of technical-scientific committees for the evaluation of inclusion of hospital drugs in these formularies. We also analyzed the time from EMA (CMPH) authorization to AIFA marketing authorization, the time from AIFA marketing authorization to patient availability, and the total time from EMA (CMPH) authorization to patient availability of the drugs in all Italian regions, for 11 of these drugs.Some drugs were included in all the regional pharmaceutical formularies, without restrictions, whereas other drugs were not included in one and others were not included in more than one formulary. Median time from EMA to AIFA was 11.2 months (range, 2.9-17.1). Median time from AIFA to patient availability was 1.4 months (range, 0.0-50.5) in regions with drug formularies versus 0.0 months in regions without drugs formularies. Median total time from EMA to patient availability was longer in regions with formularies (13.3 months; range, 2.9-65.3) than in regions without formularies (11.2 months; range, 2.9-24.0), where drugs are immediately available after AIFA marketing authorization. Moreover, the interval was very long (range, 2.9-65.3) for some drugs in regions with formularies.The analysis confirmed that the presence of multiple hierarchical levels of drug evaluation can create disparity in drug availability for Italian citizens.

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