Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research

New York City, NY, United States

Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research

New York City, NY, United States

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Patent
Columbia University and Sloan Kettering Institute For Cancer Research | Date: 2016-11-18

This invention provides a compound having the structure:


Patent
Sloan Kettering Institute For Cancer Research | Date: 2016-12-06

A novel synthesis of the anti-androgen, A52, which has been found to be useful in the treatment of prostate cancer, is provided. A52 as well as structurally related analogs may be prepared via the inventive route. This new synthetic scheme may be used to prepare kilogram scale quantities of pure A52.


Patent
Sloan Kettering Institute For Cancer Research | Date: 2017-01-18

An isolated, heteroclitic WT1 peptide, wherein the isolated peptide comprises the amino acid sequence SGQAYMFPNAPYLPSCLES (SEQ ID No: 41) and has one or more point mutations in a primary or secondary anchor residue of an HLA class I or class II binding motif, or the isolated peptide has at least 83% sequence identity with the amino acid sequence SEQ ID NO:41, or the isolated peptide is 20-26 amino acids in length and comprises the amino acid sequence SGQAYMFPNAPYLPSCLES (SEQ ID NO:41), or the isolated peptide is 17 or 18 amino acids in length and comprises a fragment of the amino acid sequence SGQAYMFPNAPYLPSCLES (SEQ ID NO:41). The peptide may be for use in treating a WT1-expressing cancer in asubject.


Patent
Sloan Kettering Institute For Cancer Research | Date: 2016-11-30

This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.


Patent
Sloan Kettering Institute For Cancer Research | Date: 2016-11-11

The invention provides compounds, methods, pharmaceutical compositions, and kits for the treatment of proliferative disorders such as cancer. In one aspect, the methods comprise compounds that inhibit the activity of protein kinases, such as cell division cycle (Cdc) kinase. In another aspect, the methods comprise compounds that inhibit Cdc7 and/or Dbf4 activity. In another aspect, the methods comprise compounds that exhibit anti-proliferative properties useful in treating diseases such as cancer. Compounds useful for any of the methods include compounds of the Formula (A) or (B): or pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof. Exemplary compounds of Formula (A) or (B) include granaticin A, granaticin B, dihydrogranaticin A, dihydrogranaticin B, medermycin, and actinorhodin.


Patent
Cornell University and Sloan Kettering Institute For Cancer Research | Date: 2017-02-08

The present invention is directed to methods of prognosing, treating, or managing treatment of cancer in a subject. These methods involve selecting a subject having cancer, obtaining, from the selected subject, a sample containing exosomes, recovering the exosomes from the sample, and isolating the double-stranded DNA from within the exosomes. The isolated double-stranded DNA is then used to detect the presence or absence of one or more genetic mutations associated with cancer, quantify the amount of isolated double-stranded DNA from the recovered exosomes in the sample, detect the methylation status of the isolated double- stranded DNA, or quantify the amount isolated double-stranded DNA able to enter a recipient cell. The prognosing, treating, or managing treatment is carried out based on this information.


Patent
Cornell University and Sloan Kettering Institute For Cancer Research | Date: 2015-04-01

The present invention is directed to methods of prognosing, treating, or managing treatment of cancer in a subject. These methods involve selecting a subject having cancer, obtaining, from the selected subject, a sample containing exosomes, recovering the exosomes from the sample, and isolating the double-stranded DNA from within the exosomes. The isolated double-stranded DNA is then used to detect the presence or absence of one or more genetic mutations associated with cancer, quantify the amount of isolated double-stranded DNA from the recovered exosomes in the sample, detect the methylation status of the isolated double-stranded DNA, or quantify the amount isolated double-stranded DNA able to enter a recipient cell. The prognosing, treating, or managing treatment is carried out based on this information.


Patent
Sloan Kettering Institute For Cancer Research | Date: 2016-12-09

The disclosure relates to Compounds of Formula (1): and pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof wherein Z_(1), Z_(2), Z_(3), Xa, Xb, Xc, Y, X_(2), and X_(4 )are as defined herein, compositions comprising an effective amount of a Compound of Formula (1) or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, and methods to treat or prevent a condition, such as cancer which overexpresses Her-kinases, comprising administering to an patient in need thereof a therapeutically effective amount of a Compound of Formula (1) or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.


Patent
Sloan Kettering Institute For Cancer Research | Date: 2017-03-15

Provided herein are compounds of (I), and pharmaceutically acceptable salts, solvates, hydrates, polymorphs, co-crystals, tautomers, stereoisomers, and prodrugs thereof. Also provided are pharmaceutical compositions and methods involving the inventive compounds for the treatment of proliferative diseases (e.g., cancer (e.g., leukemia, breast cancer, melanoma, metastatic cancer) and diseases associated with inappropriate SET8 activity. Also provided are methods for inhibiting SET8 and methods for labelling SET8.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Biomechanics & Mechanobiology | Award Amount: 535.00K | Year: 2016

Cytotoxic T cells function by selectively destroying virally infected or cancerous target cells. In recent years, this targeted killing capacity has emerged as a core component of several promising immunotherapeutic strategies to fight cancer. A better understanding of how cytotoxic T cells operate is therefore not only of biological interest but also of potential clinical relevance. T cells kill by first forming a close cell-cell interface, called an immunological synapse, with their targets. They then secrete a mixture of toxic proteins into the synapse, which damage the targets plasma membrane and intracellular contents. Recent biophysical studies have indicated that T cells exert a substantial amount of mechanical force across the synapse, which could potentially alter the shape and physical properties of the target cell. The experiments in this research will investigate the hypothesis that these forces boost killing by enhancing the activity of the toxic proteins secreted into the synapse. The idea that mechanical force and chemical signals cooperate in this manner is quite unappreciated and could represent an important new concept in the understanding of intercellular communication and immune function. The principal investigator will also develop a paid summer internship program in mechanobiology targeting female students at both the high school and university levels to provide them an entryway into a research career.

The studies will focus on potential synergy between synaptic forces and the secreted cytolytic molecule perforin, which forms proteinaceous pores on the target cell membrane. Preliminary results suggest that synapse formation increases target cell membrane tension, thereby potentiating perforin pore formation. Biophysical methods will be merged with immunological assays in order to investigate this hypothesis. Polyacrylamide hydrogel substrates will be used to explore the relationship between target cell tension and perforin pore formation. Optical trap methodology will be used to quantify the effects of synapse formation on membrane tension. Finally, polydimethylsiloxine micropillar arrays will be used to examine the spatiotemporal coordination of force exertion and perforin secretion. The successful completion of these research goals could establish mechanopotentiation (i.e. the synergy between physical and chemical signals) as an important avenue for intercellular communication, which would broadly influence current conceptions and future studies of cell-cell interactions and mechanobiology.

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