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Patent
Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Date: 2016-02-19

The inventive subject matter relates to methods for treating a T-cell deficiency in a subject in need thereof, comprising administering to said subject a T-cell precursor isolated from an allogeneic donor, provided that said allogeneic donor is not MHC-matched to said subject. The inventive methods can be further enhanced by genetic engineering for targeted immunotherapy.


Patent
Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and The United States As Represented By The Secretary | Date: 2016-12-02

The presently disclosed subject matter provides for methods and compositions for enhancing the immune response toward cancers and pathogens. It relates to chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that specifically target human mesothelin, and immunoresponsive cells comprising such CARs. The presently disclosed mesothelin-targeted CARs have enhanced immune-activating properties, including anti-tumor activity.


Patent
Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Eureka Therapeutics | Date: 2016-11-30

The present invention provides antigen binding proteins that specifically bind to Wilms tumor protein (WT1), including humanized, chimeric and fully human antibodies against WT1, antibody fragments, chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), fusion proteins, and conjugates thereof. The antigen binding proteins and antibodies bind to HLA-A0201-restricted WT1 peptide. Such antibodies, fragments, fusion proteins and conjugates thereof are useful for the treatment of WT1 associated cancers, including for example, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, chronic myelocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid/myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In more particular embodiments, the anti-WT1/A antibodies may comprise one or more framework region amino acid substitutions designed to improve protein stability, antibody binding and/or expression levels.


Patent
Agenus, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Date: 2016-09-01

The instant disclosure provides antibodies that specifically bind to human PD-1 and antagonize PD-1 function. Also provided are pharmaceutical compositions comprising these antibodies, nucleic acids encoding these antibodies, expression vectors and host cells for making these antibodies, and methods of treating a subject using these antibodies.


Patent
Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Date: 2017-02-01

The present disclosure provides, among other things, methods and compositions for diagnosing and treating stress-induced injuries, hypoxia in particular. The present invention is based, in part, on the novel discovery that a metabolite, L-2-hydroxyglutarate, and certain enzymes and substrates regulating its metabolism, mediate stress-induced cellular mechanisms. In some embodiments, provided methods and compositions are used to diagnose and treat diseases with hypoxia-induced injuries. In some embodiments, provided methods and compositions are used to modulate cell pluripotency or differentiation in vivo or in vitro.


Patent
Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Date: 2017-03-22

Provided herein is a one-step method for chelating actinium-225 to a construct comprising a chelator linked to a biomolecule, such as, an antibody or monoclonal antibody, via a bifunctional ligand in, for example, a 3-arm configuration. Also provided are methods for increasing the radiochemical yield of an actinium-225-chelant-biomolecule complex and for producing a high specific activity actinium-225 complex. The chelation is performed at a physiological temperature, about 37 C. Also provided are high specific activity actinium-225 complexes, that is, actinium-225 chelated to the chelator-biomolecule construct and pharmaceutical compositions thereof. Further provided are methods of treating a neoplastic disease or disorder with the actinium-225 complexes.


Patent
Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Date: 2017-03-01

The present disclosure describes a compositions and methods for treatment of Hras-driven cancers. Administration of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor, for example, tipifarnib, alone or in combination with a MEK inhibitor can reduce tumor size and tumor growth in cancers such as poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC)


Patent
Agenus, Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research | Date: 2017-04-05

The present disclosure provides antibodies that specifically bind to human glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family related receptor (GITR) and compositions comprising such antibodies. In a specific aspect, the antibodies specifically bind to human GITR and modulate GITR activity, e.g., enhance, activate or induce GITR activity, utilizing such antibodies. The present disclosure also provides methods for treating disorders, such as cancer and infectious diseases, by administering an antibody that specifically binds to human GITR and modulates GITR activity e.g., enhances, activates or induces GITR activity.


Giancotti F.G.,Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Cell | Year: 2013

Many cancer patients suffer from metastatic relapse several years after they have undergone radical surgery. Early cancer cell dissemination followed by a protracted period of dormancy potentially explains this prevalent clinical behavior. Increasing evidence suggests that the metastasis-initiating cells are cancer stem cells or revert to this functional state upon infiltrating a target organ. Their entry into dormancy and subsequent reactivation are governed by intrinsic programs and by contextual cues, which resemble those regulating the self-renewal capability of adult stem cells. In addition, metastatic cells undergoing reactivation are nursed by specialized extracellular matrix niches, which support positive signals, such as Wnt and Notch, and attenuate negative signals, such as BMP. In spite of significant remaining uncertainties, these findings provide a framework to understand the logic of metastatic dormancy and reactivation and open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Bennett A.V.,Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
CA: a cancer journal for clinicians | Year: 2012

Patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires assess topics a patient can report about his or her own health. This includes symptoms (eg, nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, pain, or frequent urination), physical functioning (eg, difficulty climbing stairs or difficulty fastening buttons), and mental health (eg, anxiety, fear, or worry). Electronic PRO (ePRO) systems are used in oncology clinical care because of 1) their ability to enhance clinical care by flagging important symptoms and saving clinicians time; 2) the availability of standardized methods for creating and implementing PROs in clinics; and 3) the existence of user-friendly platforms for patient self-reporting like tablet computers and automated telephone surveys. Many ePRO systems can provide actionable links to clinical care such as summary reports in a patient's electronic medical record and real-time e-mail alerts to providers when patients report acute needs. This review presents 5 examples of ePRO systems currently in use in oncology practice. These systems support multiple clinical activities, including assessment of symptoms and toxicities related to chemotherapy and radiation, postoperative surveillance, and symptom management during palliative care and hospice. Patient self-reporting is possible both at clinical visits and between visits over the Internet or by telephone. The implementation of an ePRO system requires significant resources and expertise, as well as user training. ePRO systems enable regular monitoring of patient symptoms, function, and needs, and can enhance the efficiency and quality of care as well as communication with patients. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society, Inc.

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