Menlo Park, CA, United States
Menlo Park, CA, United States

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource , a division of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is operated by Stanford University for the Department of Energy. SSRL is a National User Facility which provides synchrotron radiation, a name given to electromagnetic radiation in the x-ray, ultraviolet, visible and infrared realms produced by electrons circulating in a storage ring at nearly the speed of light. The extremely bright light that is produced can be used to investigate various forms of matter ranging from objects of atomic and molecular size to man-made materials with unusual properties. The obtained information and knowledge is of great value to society, with impact in areas such as the environment, future technologies, health, and education.The SSRL provides experimental facilities to some 2,000 academic and industrial scientists working in such varied fields as drug design, environmental cleanup, electronics, and x-ray imaging. It is located in southern San Mateo County, just outside the city of Menlo Park. Wikipedia.


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Big leaps in technology require big leaps in design ­-- entirely new approaches that can take full advantage of everything the technology has to offer. That's the thinking behind a new initiative at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Leonard brings to her new role more than 10 years as senior design lead and creative strategist at global design and innovation firm IDEO. During that time she honed her human-centered skills across a wide range of projects – from retail and finance to hospitality and health care – for clients such as Nike, Marriott, Visa, and AT&T, helping them make a positive impact through design. Her diverse background also encompasses radio broadcasting and print journalism, as well as co-authoring the award-winning book Massive Change: The Future of Global Design with Bruce Mau, a modern, illustrated primer on the new inventions, technologies, and events that are impacting humanity worldwide. “We are thrilled to have Jen join our team. Her creativity, influence and design leadership will be integral to fulfilling what we’ve set out to accomplish at Taylor Design – creating design that empowers people to do what they do best,” said Randy Regier, president, Taylor Design. “I appreciate how design can be a force for positive change in our world,” Leonard shared. “So I’m excited to see this manifest in the projects at Taylor, whose focus areas include healthcare, education and technology. Through design we can positively influence people’s lives and empower both those who serve and receive.” Leonard is also the host and producer behind Brand New Ways, an interview-based podcast about change making and rule breaking. She received her design diploma from the Institute without Boundaries, at George Brown College of Applied Arts and Technology in Toronto, Canada, and studied journalism at the Graduate School of Journalism, The University of Western Ontario, in London, Canada. Her undergraduate degrees are in Sociology (Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada) and Anthropology (The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada). About Taylor Design: Taylor Design is a full-service design firm that collaborates with clients to learn together and develop powerful user-based solutions, places and services that drive value and are effective, valid and delightful. The firm’s three practices in architecture, environments and strategies are united in their use of design as both a point of view, and a unifying method for its work. With offices in northern and southern California, Taylor Design’s dynamic and effective strategy-based practice assures that decisions made at every stage of the design process have a positive impact on organizations and communities. Clients of the firm have included: UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland; UC Berkeley; UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco; Stanford University; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; San Mateo County; Scripps Health, San Diego; UC San Diego Health System, San Diego; UC Irvine Health, Orange County; Hoag Health Network, Orange County; as well as numerous service areas for Kaiser Permanente, among others. For more information about Taylor Design, visit Irvine, CA, April 26, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Taylor Design, a solution-oriented architecture, environments and strategies firm, has announced that Jen Leonard has joined the firm as Strategies Practice Leader. In this role, she will focus on bringing her human-centered design experience to Taylor Design collaborating across its Irvine, San Francisco and San Diego offices, and inspiring new ways of approaching design challenges.Leonard brings to her new role more than 10 years as senior design lead and creative strategist at global design and innovation firm IDEO. During that time she honed her human-centered skills across a wide range of projects – from retail and finance to hospitality and health care – for clients such as Nike, Marriott, Visa, and AT&T, helping them make a positive impact through design. Her diverse background also encompasses radio broadcasting and print journalism, as well as co-authoring the award-winning book Massive Change: The Future of Global Design with Bruce Mau, a modern, illustrated primer on the new inventions, technologies, and events that are impacting humanity worldwide.“We are thrilled to have Jen join our team. Her creativity, influence and design leadership will be integral to fulfilling what we’ve set out to accomplish at Taylor Design – creating design that empowers people to do what they do best,” said Randy Regier, president, Taylor Design.“I appreciate how design can be a force for positive change in our world,” Leonard shared. “So I’m excited to see this manifest in the projects at Taylor, whose focus areas include healthcare, education and technology. Through design we can positively influence people’s lives and empower both those who serve and receive.”Leonard is also the host and producer behind Brand New Ways, an interview-based podcast about change making and rule breaking. She received her design diploma from the Institute without Boundaries, at George Brown College of Applied Arts and Technology in Toronto, Canada, and studied journalism at the Graduate School of Journalism, The University of Western Ontario, in London, Canada. Her undergraduate degrees are in Sociology (Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada) and Anthropology (The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada).About Taylor Design: Taylor Design is a full-service design firm that collaborates with clients to learn together and develop powerful user-based solutions, places and services that drive value and are effective, valid and delightful. The firm’s three practices in architecture, environments and strategies are united in their use of design as both a point of view, and a unifying method for its work. With offices in northern and southern California, Taylor Design’s dynamic and effective strategy-based practice assures that decisions made at every stage of the design process have a positive impact on organizations and communities. Clients of the firm have included: UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland; UC Berkeley; UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco; Stanford University; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; San Mateo County; Scripps Health, San Diego; UC San Diego Health System, San Diego; UC Irvine Health, Orange County; Hoag Health Network, Orange County; as well as numerous service areas for Kaiser Permanente, among others. For more information about Taylor Design, visit www.WeAreTaylor.com Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Taylor Design


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: phys.org

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) physicist Felicie Albert led an international team pursuing this new regime in laser research, which was described in a Physical Review Letters (PRL) paper published online March 31. Albert and the team spent more than two years experimenting with new ways to generate X-rays capable of probing the size, density, pressure and composition of highly transient states of matter, such as those found in the cores of planets and in fusion plasmas. Plasmas make up 99 percent of the known universe. The researchers studied betatron X-ray radiation, emitted when electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies and wiggle in the plasma wave produced by the interaction of a short, intense laser pulse with a gas. Traditionally, this source has been well studied for laser pulses with femtosecond (quadrillionth of a second)-long durations.To study betatron X-ray emission at the intensities and pulse durations relevant to larger-scale laser facilities, such as LLNL's Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser, the researchers conducted an experiment on the Titan Laser at the Laboratory's Jupiter Laser Facility. There they observed betatron X-ray radiation driven by much longer, picosecond-duration laser pulses. "For me a picosecond is forever," Albert joked. While picoseconds measure time in trillionths of a second, that's slow to a researcher who prefers even shorter laser pulses. The experimental work shows that the new radiation source holds great promise for undertaking applications at international large-scale laser facilities, where it potentially could be used for X-ray radiography and phase contrast imaging of laser-driven shocks, absorption spectroscopy and opacity measurements. Other LLNL colleagues include Nuno Lemos, Brad Pollock, Clement Goyon, Arthur Pak, Joseph Ralph and John Moody, along with collaborators from the University of California-Los Angeles, the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of California-Berkeley and the University of Lisbon in Portugal. Albert noted that the results did not reveal themselves immediately as in some experiments, and that it took the team a lot of analysis and hard work to uncover the new regime. They note in their paper the wide variety of potential uses of the technology: Betatron X-ray radiation driven by short-pulse lasers has been used for biological and medical purposes, such as X-ray phase contrast imaging of insects and hard X-ray radiography of bone. Its unique properties also make it suitable for studying the dynamics of high-energy-density plasmas and warm dense matter - a state near solid densities - and temperatures found in the cores of giant planets like Jupiter and in inertial confinement fusion plasmas. More information: F. Albert et al. Observation of Betatron X-Ray Radiation in a Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Accelerator Driven with Picosecond Laser Pulses, Physical Review Letters (2017). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.134801


Brongersma M.L.,Stanford University | Cui Y.,Stanford University | Cui Y.,SLAC | Fan S.,Stanford University
Nature Materials | Year: 2014

High-performance photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into clean electrical power, and transparent dielectrics or conductive oxides as antireflection coatings. A common feature of these materials is their high refractive index. Whereas high-index materials in a planar form tend to produce a strong, undesired reflection of sunlight, high-index nanostructures afford new ways to manipulate light at a subwavelength scale. For example, nanoscale wires, particles and voids support strong optical resonances that can enhance and effectively control light absorption and scattering processes. As such, they provide ideal building blocks for novel, broadband antireflection coatings, light-trapping layers and super-absorbing films. This Review discusses some of the recent developments in the design and implementation of such photonic elements in thin-film photovoltaic cells. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


Atomic resolution structures of large biomacromolecular complexes can now be recorded at room temperature from crystals with submicrometer dimensions using intense femtosecond pulses delivered by the worlds largest and most powerful X-ray machine, a laser called the Linac Coherent Light Source. Abundant opportunities exist for the bioanalytical sciences to help extend this revolutionary advance in structural biology to the ultimate goal of recording molecular-movies of noncrystalline biomacromolecules. This Feature will introduce the concept of serial femtosecond crystallography to the nonexpert, briefly review progress to date, and highlight some potential contributions from the analytical sciences. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Luntz A.C.,SLAC | McCloskey B.D.,University of California at Berkeley | McCloskey B.D.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2014

The major issue confronting complete electrification of road transport is simply a battery problem. While both metrics are undoubtedly important, which of the two is the most important for EV applications is somewhat debated, even among the different EV manufacturers. Traditional car companies emphasize more the importance of energy density, while Tesla emphasizes more the specific energy since they tend to design a car around the battery pack. The history of rechargeable non-aqueous Li-air batteries at this stage is so short that the field must be considered a work in progress. In fact, even the basic mechanisms and rationale for many of the fundamental properties of Li-air are still in dispute among many of the researchers in the field.


Mannsfeld S.C.B.,SLAC
Nature Materials | Year: 2012

Stefan C. B. Mannsfeld states that development in organic electronics depends on the understanding of the structure-property relationships of organic materials. Resonant scattering of polarized soft X-rays (P-SoXS) by aromatic carbon bonds has been used to probe molecular orientation in thin organic semiconductor films down to length scales of 20 nm. The basic principle of the P-SoXS technique involves a polarized soft X-ray beam passing through a thin sample and the scattering signal and recorded by an X-ray sensitive detector. Soft X-rays are distinguished from hard X-rays by their lower photon energies, which fall into the same energy range as the fundamental electronic transitions of many lighter atoms, including carbon. The novelty of P-SoXS lies in the use of scattering with polarized soft X-rays whose energy is tuned to a fundamental carbon transition in aromatic carbon ring systems.


Hettel R.,SLAC
Journal of Synchrotron Radiation | Year: 2014

It has been known for decades that the emittance of multi-GeV storage rings can be reduced to very small values using multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattices. However, a practical design of a ring having emittance approaching the diffraction limit for multi-keV photons, i.e. a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR), with a circumference of order 1km or less was not possible before the development of small-aperture vacuum systems and other accelerator technology, together with an evolution in the understanding and accurate simulation of non-linear beam dynamics, had taken place. The 3-GeV MAXIV project in Sweden has initiated a new era of MBA storage ring light source design, i.e. a fourth generation, with the Sirius project in Brazil now following suit, each having an order of magnitude smaller horizontal emittance than third-generation machines. The ESRF, APS and SPring-8 are all exploring 6-GeV MBA lattice conversions in the imminent future while China is considering a similar-energy green-field machine. Other lower-energy facilities, including the ALS, SLS, Soleil, Diamond and others, are studying the possibility of such conversions. Future larger-circumference rings, possibly housed in >2-km tunnels made available by decommissioned high-energy physics accelerators, could have sub-10-pm-rad emittances, providing very high coherence for >10-keV X-rays. A review of fourth-generation ring design concepts and plans in the world is presented. © 2014 International Union of Crystallography.


Rizzo T.G.,SLAC
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2014

The production of new gauge bosons is a standard benchmark for the exploration of the physics capabilities of future colliders. The s=100TeV future hadron collider will make a major step in our ability to search for and explore the properties of such new states. In this paper, employing traditional models to make contact with the past and more recent literature, we not only establish in detail the discovery and exclusion reaches for both the Z′ and W′ within these models, but, more importantly, we also examine the capability of the future hadron collider to extract information relevant for the determination of the couplings of the Z′ to the fermions of the Standard Model as well as the helicity of the corresponding W′ couplings. This is a necessary first step in determining the nature of the underlying theory, which gave rise to these states. © 2014 American Physical Society.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

There is a continuing need for high power circulators to protect the next generation of high power RF sources from waveguide reflections that can destroy the device. Currently, the power level of circulators is limited by the materials, specifically ferrites that provide the required non-reciprocal operation. New approaches are required that use materials capable of very high power operation. Statement of how this problem or situation is being addressed Calabazas Creek Research Inc. and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory propose to explore a new approach that avoids ferrites and other materials unable to support high power operation. The new approach uses coupled cavities and RF modulation to provide the required performance. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits High power circulators are required whenever high power RF sources are driving loads where reflected power may occur. This includes RF sources for high energy accelerators and colliders. Circulators are also used in some high power radar applications and are a key component of a magnetron-based power source being developed for accelerators. Key Words. Circulator, ferrites, piezoelectric, RF source, accelerator Summary for Members of Congress The proposed program will develop a device to protect high power RF sources from destructive reflections in accelerator and collider applications. This will allow an increase of source power, reducing cost for these systems.

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