Woolloomooloo, Australia
Woolloomooloo, Australia

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Dudley D.A.,Macquarie University | Winslade M.J.,Charles Sturt University | Wright B.J.,Charles Sturt University | Cotton W.G.,University of Sydney | And 2 more authors.
BMC Public Health | Year: 2015

Background: Previous evaluations of the SunSmart Program have supported the link between a written sun protection policy and improved sun protection behaviours in New South Wales (NSW) primary schools. However these evaluations have relied on self-reported data and research suggests that direct observations are required to better represent schools' usual sun protective practices. Methods/Design: Data will be collected in the summer months of 2014, 2015, and 2016 as part of an 18-month cluster-controlled trial in NSW primary schools (n = 20). Researchers will conduct three direct observations to record students' hat use and teachers' use of sun protective measures during recess and lunch periods in each school. Researchers will also record the volume of sunscreen that the Year 6 classes in each school utilise over the term. At the conclusion of baseline data collection, five schools will be randomised into an intervention group that will work with researchers to develop a policy-driven intervention to improve sun safety behaviour in NSW primary schools. Discussion: An initial review of relevant Australian and New Zealand literature suggests that provision of policy support is likely to improve school sun protection practices; however there is no suggested model for this support. This will be the first objective analysis of sun safe behaviours leading to a policy-driven intervention conducted in Australian primary schools since the 1990s, and will inform the future direction of sun safety in our schools. Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12614000926639 Registered 28th August 2014. © 2015 Dudley et al.


PubMed | Skin Cancer Prevention Unit, University of Sydney, Charles Sturt University and Macquarie University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: BMC public health | Year: 2017

Previous evaluations have supported the link between sun protection policies and improved sun protection behaviours. However these evaluations have relied on self-reported data.A cross-sectional design as part of an ongoing 18-month cluster-controlled trial in primary schools (n=20) was used. Researchers conducted direct observations to record students hat use and teachers use of sun protective measures during recess and lunch. Researchers also recorded the volume of sunscreen consumed in each school.Only 60% of primary school children wear a sun-safe hat during their breaks when observed using objective measures. Weak correlations were observed between the wearing of a sun-safe hat and a schools socio-economic status (r=0.26). All other independent variables measured had only very weak correlations (r<0.19) with sun-safe hat wearing behaviour of students. Sunscreen consumption by school students during the school day is negligible.A large percentage of NSW primary schools in this study wear sun-safe hats during the school day but this is well below what has been reported in previous national surveys. Given the finite resources of schools and the correlation, though small, with SES status for these behaviours, it behoves researchers to investigate low-cost solutions to these problems. Further qualitative data will also be needed to inform the enablers and barriers for sun-safe behaviour interventions to be adopted in NSW primary schools.


Potente S.,Skin Cancer Prevention Unit | Anderson C.,Skin Cancer Prevention Unit | Karim M.,Skin Cancer Prevention Unit
Health Promotion Journal of Australia | Year: 2011

Issues addressed: The results of a sun protection audit of outdoor recreational environments in three NSW coastal towns. Methods: Thirty public swimming pools, beaches, sports grounds and skate parks were visited at two time points before and after summer (October 2009 and April 2010) and audited for the availability of sun protection, supportive polices and signage. Results: There was insufficient shade in more than half (58%) of the observed sites at sports grounds, 49% of areas at beaches and 40% of areas at skate parks with most of these sites relying on natural shade (47-58%). Although pools were more likely to have shade available over most of the observed areas (36%) and permanent shade structures (75%), no shade was observed over any main outdoor pools. Similarly, there was only shade available over one of the main sporting grounds, one main beach and none of the main skate ramps. For other types of sun protection, sunscreen was the most popular product available either for free (nine sites) or for sale (eight sites). All pools had at least one supportive sun protection policy but only two of the total 30 sites had any related signage. Conclusions: This study demonstrates recent findings in relation to the accessibility of sun protection in these settings and the need for health promoting organisations to support and engage councils to invest in more sun protection strategies. The areas of focus should be shade provision particularly at beaches, skate parks and sports grounds; extending the availability of other types of sun protection; and introducing related policies and signage in more sites.


PubMed | Skin Cancer Prevention Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Health promotion journal of Australia : official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals | Year: 2011

The results of a sun protection audit of outdoor recreational environments in three NSW coastal towns.Thirty public swimming pools, beaches, sports grounds and skate parks were visited at two time points before and after summer (October 2009 and April 2010) and audited for the availability of sun protection, supportive polices and signage.There was insufficient shade in more than half (58%) of the observed sites at sports grounds, 49% of areas at beaches and 40% of areas at skate parks with most of these sites relying on natural shade (47-58%). Although pools were more likely to have shade available over most of the observed areas (36%) and permanent shade structures (75%), no shade was observed over any main outdoor pools. Similarly, there was only shade available over one of the main sporting grounds, one main beach and none of the main skate ramps. For other types of sun protection, sunscreen was the most popular product available either for free (nine sites) or for sale (eight sites). All pools had at least one supportive sun protection policy but only two of the total 30 sites had any related signage.This study demonstrates recent findings in relation to the accessibility of sun protection in these settings and the need for health promoting organisations to support and engage councils to invest in more sun protection strategies. The areas of focus should be shade provision particularly at beaches, skate parks and sports grounds; extending the availability of other types of sun protection; and introducing related policies and signage in more sites.

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