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Tallman M.J.,Kellogg Brown and Root | Eng C.N.,Kellogg Brown and Root | Choi S.,Catalyst and Process R and nter | Park D.S.,SK Innovation Global Technology
11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Spring Meeting and 7th Global Congress on Process Safety, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2011

Steam cracking and refinery sources will not keep pace with future propylene demand. Thus, on-purpose technologies, e.g., Advanced Catalytic Olefins (ACO™) are becoming more prevalent. A discussion on ACO covers its features; economic comparison to steam cracking when processing a typical naphtha feed; and the ACO Demonstration Unit constructed by SK Global Chemical at its site in Ulsan, Korea. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2011 AIChE Spring Meeting & 7th Global Congress on Process Safety (Chicago, IL 3/13-17/2011).


Cho H.,Yonsei University | Cha B.,Yonsei University | Ryu J.,SK Innovation Global Technology | Kim S.,SK Innovation Global Technology | Moon I.,Yonsei University
Computer Aided Chemical Engineering | Year: 2012

In general, growing particle deposit in reactor cyclone duct has caused operational safety problems as well as a decrease of the cyclone efficiency. In this paper, Computational Particle Fluid Dynamics (CPFD) simulation for forecasting the behaviors of particle deposit formation in cyclone duct in Residue Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (RFCC) process is carried out. The CPFD simulation based on Multi-Phase Particle In Cell (MP-PIC) method in which particle phase is based on a stochastic particle model using the Lagrangian method and fluid phase based on an Eulerian method. We aim at analyzing the flow patterns of both particles and fluids, depending on the different sizes and shapes of the cyclone duct. As a result, we found that low speed zone existed on the duct 90° (inlet position 0) at the initial time. Some particles passing out of main flow path tend to stick to the wall of the cyclone duct due to its low speed. A set of regions where particle deposit formation takes place are set as a start point for CPFD simulation. The deposit grew up to the size of 90mm thick, and sometimes fell off due to scouring phenomenon, which results in plugging in the dipleg, leading to serious problems such as carryover. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Tallman M.J.,Kellogg Brown and Root | Eng C.N.,Kellogg Brown and Root | Choi S.,SK Innovation Global Technology | Park D.S.,SK Innovation Global Technology
AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2011

With the number of new ethane-based crackers coming on line in the next few years, it is anticipated that the traditional source of nearly two-thirds of the world's propylene, steam crackers, will fall short of demand. Thus, there is great interest in new propylene-onpurpose technologies. One such technology is the Advanced Catalytic Olefins (ACO™) process, an FCC-type process which cracks straight run feeds such as naphtha (already the feed source for approximately half of the world's ethylene production) to large quantities of propylene and ethylene. Compared to a traditional steam cracker, ACO produces significantly more propylene (typical P/E production ratio is approximately 1:1) and more total olefins at lower energy consumption and CO 2 footprint. A description of the ACO process is provided, along with an economic comparison to steam cracking when processing a typical naphtha feed. A description of the ACO Demonstration Unit constructed by SK Global Chemical (formerly SK Energy) at its site in Ulsan, Korea, the first commercial demonstration of ACO technology, is also provided, including a summary of early operations which began in 4Q10.


Tallman M.J.,Kellogg Brown and Root | Eng C.N.,Catalyst and Process Randnter | Choi S.,SK Innovation Global Technology | Park D.S.,SK Innovation Global Technology
AIChE Ethylene Producers Conference Proceedings | Year: 2011

With the number of new ethane-based crackers coming on line in the next few years, it is anticipated that the traditional source of nearly two-thirds of the world's propylene, steam crackers, will fall short of demand. Thus, there is great interest in new propylene-on-purpose technologies. One such technology is the Advanced Catalytic Olefins (ACO™) process, an FCC-type process which cracks straight run feeds such as naphtha (already the feed source for approximately half of the world's ethylene production) to large quantities of propylene and ethylene. Compared to a traditional steam cracker, ACO produces significantly more propylene (typical P/E production ratio is approximately 1:1) and more total olefins at lower energy consumption and C02 footprint. A description of the ACO process is provided, along with an economic comparison to steam cracking when processing a typical naphtha feed. A description of the ACO Demonstration Unit constructed by SK Global Chemical (formerly SK Energy) at its site in Ulsan, Korea, the first commercial demonstration of ACO technology, is also provided, including a summary of early operations which began in 4Q10.


Cho S.,Seoul National University | Jeong H.,Seoul National University | Han C.,Seoul National University | Jin S.,SK Innovation Global Technology | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Chemical Engineering of Japan | Year: 2012

Estimation algorithms to measure the actual performance of a lithium-ion battery are presented for real-time online monitoring. Capacity was selected as the representative variable indicating the performance of the battery. Three algorithms were suggested to estimate the degree of capacity fading: principal algorithm, supplementary algorithm, and hybridized algorithm. The principal algorithm was based on a simplied equivalent circuit model and a soft sensor technique. The soft sensor technique was based on a system identication methodology with moving horizon estimation. The supplementary algorithm was developed to compensate for the problem of computational load. Finally, both the algorithms were combined to develop a complementary hybridized algorithm. The suitability of the algorithms was demonstrated with real-time online monitoring of fresh and aged cells using cyclic experiments. © 2012 The Society of Chemical Engineers, Japan.

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