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Karachi, Pakistan

Moin S.,University of Karachi | Moin S.,Sir Syed Medical College | Haider S.,University of Karachi | Khaliq S.,University of Karachi | And 2 more authors.
Pakistan Veterinary Journal | Year: 2012

Stress produces behavioral and neurochemical deficits. To study the relationship between adaptation to stress and macronutrient intake, the present study was designed to monitor the effects of different diets on feed intake, growth rate and serotonin (5-Hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) metabolism following exposure to restraint stress in rats. Rats were divided into four groups (n=12) as control, sugar, protein and fat rich diet fed rats. After5 weeks of treatment animals of each group were divided into unrestrained and restrained animals (n=6). Rats of restrained group were given immobilization stress for 2 hours/day for 5 days. Food intake and growth rates of unrestrained and restrained rats were monitored daily. Rats were decapitated on 6th day to collect brain samples for neurochemical estimation. Results show that sugar diet fed rats produced adaptation to stress early as compared to normal diet fed rats. Food intake and growth rates of unrestrained and restrained rats were comparable on 3rd day in sugar diet fed rats and on 4th day in normal diet fed rats. Stress decreased food intake and growth rates ofprotein and fat treated rats. Repeated stress did not alter brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels of normal diet fed rats and sugar diet fed rats. Protein diet fed restrained rats showed elevated brain 5-HT levels. Fat diet fed restrained rats significantly decreased brain TRP and 5-HIAA levels. Finding suggested that carbohydrate diet might protect against stressful conditions. Study also showed that nutritional status could alter different behaviors in response to a stressful environment. © 2011 PVJ. Source

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