Sinai Hospital

West Ocean City, MD, United States

Sinai Hospital

West Ocean City, MD, United States

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LOS ANGELES & ANN ARBOR, Mich.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Beverly Hills, California surgeon Dr. Raymond Douglas and Ann Arbor, Michigan’s Dr. Terry Smith – two prominent physicians specializing in thyroid-associated diseases – have unveiled a dramatic new non-surgical treatment for thyroid eye disease, one of the more serious symptoms of Graves’ disease. In develop for nearly 15 years by Dr.’s Douglas and Smith, Teprotumumab has been designated by the FDA as a “breakthrough” therapy, a term reserved exclusively for drugs that are destined to radically change the specific field of medicine. Profiled this month by the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine in a paper co-authored by the two surgeons, Teprotumumab will make its public debut this summer for availability through approximately six medical centers in the U.S., including Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles and La Peer Health Center in Beverly Hills. Marking the first time that a medicine can replace surgery for thyroid eye disease, Teprotumumab not only acts as an antibody to block the disease from progressing, but is also shown to completely reverse the disease. A total of 22 centers nationwide were involved in the trials, making it the largest biologic trials ever for the disease. Dr. Douglas, who served as the lead investigator on the national Teprotumumab trials, will supervise the final trials, which are set to take place later this month in Los Angeles. An estimated 20 million Americans suffer from some form of thyroid disease. The most common form of hyperthyroidism, Graves’ Disease causes a variety of symptoms including extreme anxiety and fatigue, hand tremors, increased sweating and weight loss. The disease is most often associated with bulging of the eyes, medically referred to as ophthalmopathy, that affects up to 50% of Graves’ victims. Teprotumumab works to block molecules that target tissues in the eye that result in the bulging appearance of Graves’ eye disease. “ Doctors Raymond Douglas and Terry Smith’s collaboration has succeeded in ushering in a truly game-changing treatment for thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy. Not only does Teprotumumab replace surgery, the drug represents the first and only medicine that has been shown to reverse the disease. Already, Teprotumumab is being embraced by the medical profession and is destined to become embraced by those suffering from Graves’ disease. Cedars Sinai Medical Center is extremely proud to serve as a center for this extraordinary therapy,” said Dr. Bruce L. Gewertz, M.D., Chair, Department of Surgery and Vice-Dean for Academic Affairs, Cedars-Sinai. Dr. Raymond Douglas is an experienced and board-certified oculoplastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, CA. He specializes in reconstructive and aesthetic surgery. Patients with thyroid eye disease, previous unsuccessful surgery (blepharoplasty), cancers of the eyelids and face, and trauma-induced injuries all seek Dr. Douglas’ expert care. Dr. Douglas also has a practice in Shanghai, China, and is frequently asked to teach his novel techniques to other surgeons internationally. Prior to opening his private practice in Beverly Hills, he served as the director of the Thyroid Eye Disease Center at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. His expertise in treating thyroid-associated eye diseases and cosmetic and reconstruction surgeries has made him a highly respected and sought after physician. Currently, Dr. Douglas is the Director of the Orbital and Thyroid Eye Disease program at the prestigious Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Douglas has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and textbook chapters and his special interest in thyroid eye disease has led him to lecture on the topic on a national and international basis. He is also the author of the definitive textbook on the many facets of care for thyroid eye disease. Dr. Douglas has earned a reputation for his customized approach to rehabilitation, which has led to safer treatments with less scarring and significantly faster recoveries. He sees patients in southern California, nationally and internationally, and is committed to providing each patient with an individualized treatment plan on how to best restore their health, vitality and appearance. Dr. Terry J. Smith, the Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Michigan, is an internationally known endocrinologist who has studied Graves’ disease, its eye manifestations, and related autoimmune diseases for over 20 years. Dr. Smith’s laboratory was first to describe the unique molecular attributes of tissue surrounding the eye that make it susceptible to inflammation in Graves’ disease. Dr. Smith received his medical degree from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and completed his residency at the University of Illinois in Chicago and Sinai Hospital in Baltimore. He has completed fellowships in biophysics at the University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, in molecular biochemistry at Columbia University in New York, and clinical endocrinology at the Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago. Dr. Smith is the author of over 150 articles and book chapters, and has been awarded five patents for his research discoveries. He has been elected to the Orbit Society, is chief scientific officer for the National Graves’ Foundation, and serves as reviewer for numerous scientific journals. Dr. Smith has been funded continuously by the National Institutes of Health and the Veterans Administration since 1983.


FDA Designates Teprotumumab as a "Breakthrough Therapy" Combatting Thyroid Eye Disease; New England Journal of Medicine Publishes Paper on the Game-Changing Drug Co-Authored By Doctors Smith and Douglas ANN ARBOR, MI and LOS ANGELES, CA / ACCESSWIRE / May 16, 2017 / The University of Michigan's Dr. Terry J. Smith and Beverly Hills, California surgeon Dr. Raymond Douglas - two prominent physicians specializing in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, also known as Graves' eye disease - have unveiled a dramatic new non-surgical treatment for Thyroid Eye Disease, one of the more serious symptoms of Graves' disease. Proof of the treatment's efficacy resulted from a 24 week treatment trial. The rationale for using Teprotumumab in thyroid eye disease was developed in Dr. Smith's laboratory over 20 years ago. The drug was repurposed from its initial target, cancer. It now has been designated by the FDA as a "breakthrough" therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease. This designation is reserved for drugs that are destined to radically change a specific field of medicine. A paper describing results of the clinical trial was published this month by the New England Journal of Medicine. A second trial is scheduled to begin enrolling participants later this Spring to further examine Teprotumumab's effectiveness. Several medical centers in the US and Europe will participate, including Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles, CA, La Peer Health Center in Beverly Hills, CA, and the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor, MI. Identification of Teprotumumab as a therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease represents an approach that will potentially replace surgery as a treatment for this condition. Teprotumumab is a monoclonal antibody that blocks a protein, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, thought to be involved in the disease process. Teprotumumab appears to stop the disease from progressing and may also reverse it. A total of 15 centers worldwide were involved in the initial trial that was just reported, making it the largest clinical study of a biologic agent in Thyroid Eye Disease. Drs. Smith and Douglas served as lead investigators on this recently concluded trial. Both investigators will also supervise the upcoming trial. An estimated 20 million Americans suffer from some form of thyroid disease. The most common form of hyperthyroidism in North America, Graves' disease, causes several characteristic symptoms including extreme anxiety and fatigue, hand tremors, increased perspiration, and weight loss. The disease is often associated with bulging of the eyes, medically referred to as ophthalmopathy, and affects up to 50% of patients with Graves' disease. Teprotumumab works to block molecules that target tissues around the eye and in the immune system that result in the bulging appearance of Graves' eye disease. The decades-long work conducted at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles and later at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor has succeeded in ushering in a truly game-changing treatment for thyroid eye disease. Not only might Teprotumumab replace surgery, the drug represents the first and only medicine that has been shown to reverse the disease in a double masked, placebo controlled clinical trial. Initial reaction from the medical community has been extremely positive. The authors believe that the drug will help many patients suffering from Graves' disease. "Cedars Sinai Medical Center is extremely proud to serve as a center for this extraordinary therapy," said Dr. Bruce L. Gewertz, M.D, Chair, Department of Surgery and Vice-Dean for Academic Affairs, Cedars-Sinai. Dr. Terry J. Smith, the Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Michigan, is an internationally-known endocrinologist who has studied Graves' disease, its eye manifestations, and related autoimmune disease for over 20 years. Dr. Smith's laboratory was first to describe the unique molecular attributes of tissue surrounding the eye that make it susceptible to inflammation in Graves' disease. Dr. Smith received his medical degree from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and completed his residency at the University of Illinois in Chicago and Sinai Hospital in Baltimore. He has completed fellowships in biophysics at the University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, in molecular biochemistry at Columbia University in New York, and clinical endocrinology at the Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago. Dr. Smith is the author of over 250 articles and book chapters, and has been awarded five patents for his research discoveries. He has been elected to the Orbit Society, is chief scientific officer for the National Graves' Foundation, and serves as reviewer for numerous scientific journals. Dr. Smith has been funded continuously by the National Institutes of Health and the Veterans Administration since 1983. Dr. Raymond Douglas is an experienced and board certified oculoplastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, CA. He specializes in reconstructive and aesthetic surgery. Patients with thyroid eye disease, previous unsuccessful surgery (blepharoplasty), cancers of the eyelids and face, and trauma-induced injuries all seek Dr. Douglas' expert care. Dr. Douglas also has a practice in Shanghai, China and is frequently asked to teach his novel techniques to other surgeons internationally. Prior to opening his private practice in Beverly Hills, he served as the director of the Thyroid Eye Disease Center at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. His expertise in treating thyroid-associated eye diseases and cosmetic and reconstruction surgeries has made him a highly respected and sought after physician. Currently, Dr. Douglas is the Director of the Orbital and Thyroid Eye Disease program at the prestigious Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Douglas has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and textbook chapters and his special interest in thyroid eye disease has led him to lecture on the topic on a national and international basis. He is also the author of the definitive textbook on the many facets of care for thyroid eye disease. Dr. Douglas has earned a reputation for his customized approach to rehabilitation, which has led to safer treatments with less scarring and significantly faster recoveries. He sees patients in southern California, nationally and internationally and is committed to providing each patient with an individualized treatment plan on how to best restore their health, vitality and appearance.


FDA Designates Teprotumumab as a "Breakthrough Therapy" Combatting Thyroid Eye Disease; New England Journal of Medicine Publishes Paper on the Game-Changing Drug Co-Authored By Doctors Smith and Douglas ANN ARBOR, MI and LOS ANGELES, CA / ACCESSWIRE / May 16, 2017 / The University of Michigan's Dr. Terry J. Smith and Beverly Hills, California surgeon Dr. Raymond Douglas - two prominent physicians specializing in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, also known as Graves' eye disease - have unveiled a dramatic new non-surgical treatment for Thyroid Eye Disease, one of the more serious symptoms of Graves' disease. Proof of the treatment's efficacy resulted from a 24 week treatment trial. The rationale for using Teprotumumab in thyroid eye disease was developed in Dr. Smith's laboratory over 20 years ago. The drug was repurposed from its initial target, cancer. It now has been designated by the FDA as a "breakthrough" therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease. This designation is reserved for drugs that are destined to radically change a specific field of medicine. A paper describing results of the clinical trial was published this month by the New England Journal of Medicine. A second trial is scheduled to begin enrolling participants later this Spring to further examine Teprotumumab's effectiveness. Several medical centers in the US and Europe will participate, including Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles, CA, La Peer Health Center in Beverly Hills, CA, and the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor, MI. Identification of Teprotumumab as a therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease represents an approach that will potentially replace surgery as a treatment for this condition. Teprotumumab is a monoclonal antibody that blocks a protein, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, thought to be involved in the disease process. Teprotumumab appears to stop the disease from progressing and may also reverse it. A total of 15 centers worldwide were involved in the initial trial that was just reported, making it the largest clinical study of a biologic agent in Thyroid Eye Disease. Drs. Smith and Douglas served as lead investigators on this recently concluded trial. Both investigators will also supervise the upcoming trial. An estimated 20 million Americans suffer from some form of thyroid disease. The most common form of hyperthyroidism in North America, Graves' disease, causes several characteristic symptoms including extreme anxiety and fatigue, hand tremors, increased perspiration, and weight loss. The disease is often associated with bulging of the eyes, medically referred to as ophthalmopathy, and affects up to 50% of patients with Graves' disease. Teprotumumab works to block molecules that target tissues around the eye and in the immune system that result in the bulging appearance of Graves' eye disease. The decades-long work conducted at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles and later at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor has succeeded in ushering in a truly game-changing treatment for thyroid eye disease. Not only might Teprotumumab replace surgery, the drug represents the first and only medicine that has been shown to reverse the disease in a double masked, placebo controlled clinical trial. Initial reaction from the medical community has been extremely positive. The authors believe that the drug will help many patients suffering from Graves' disease. "Cedars Sinai Medical Center is extremely proud to serve as a center for this extraordinary therapy," said Dr. Bruce L. Gewertz, M.D, Chair, Department of Surgery and Vice-Dean for Academic Affairs, Cedars-Sinai. Dr. Terry J. Smith, the Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Michigan, is an internationally-known endocrinologist who has studied Graves' disease, its eye manifestations, and related autoimmune disease for over 20 years. Dr. Smith's laboratory was first to describe the unique molecular attributes of tissue surrounding the eye that make it susceptible to inflammation in Graves' disease. Dr. Smith received his medical degree from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and completed his residency at the University of Illinois in Chicago and Sinai Hospital in Baltimore. He has completed fellowships in biophysics at the University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, in molecular biochemistry at Columbia University in New York, and clinical endocrinology at the Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago. Dr. Smith is the author of over 250 articles and book chapters, and has been awarded five patents for his research discoveries. He has been elected to the Orbit Society, is chief scientific officer for the National Graves' Foundation, and serves as reviewer for numerous scientific journals. Dr. Smith has been funded continuously by the National Institutes of Health and the Veterans Administration since 1983. Dr. Raymond Douglas is an experienced and board certified oculoplastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, CA. He specializes in reconstructive and aesthetic surgery. Patients with thyroid eye disease, previous unsuccessful surgery (blepharoplasty), cancers of the eyelids and face, and trauma-induced injuries all seek Dr. Douglas' expert care. Dr. Douglas also has a practice in Shanghai, China and is frequently asked to teach his novel techniques to other surgeons internationally. Prior to opening his private practice in Beverly Hills, he served as the director of the Thyroid Eye Disease Center at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. His expertise in treating thyroid-associated eye diseases and cosmetic and reconstruction surgeries has made him a highly respected and sought after physician. Currently, Dr. Douglas is the Director of the Orbital and Thyroid Eye Disease program at the prestigious Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Douglas has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and textbook chapters and his special interest in thyroid eye disease has led him to lecture on the topic on a national and international basis. He is also the author of the definitive textbook on the many facets of care for thyroid eye disease. Dr. Douglas has earned a reputation for his customized approach to rehabilitation, which has led to safer treatments with less scarring and significantly faster recoveries. He sees patients in southern California, nationally and internationally and is committed to providing each patient with an individualized treatment plan on how to best restore their health, vitality and appearance. FDA Designates Teprotumumab as a "Breakthrough Therapy" Combatting Thyroid Eye Disease; New England Journal of Medicine Publishes Paper on the Game-Changing Drug Co-Authored By Doctors Smith and Douglas ANN ARBOR, MI and LOS ANGELES, CA / ACCESSWIRE / May 16, 2017 / The University of Michigan's Dr. Terry J. Smith and Beverly Hills, California surgeon Dr. Raymond Douglas - two prominent physicians specializing in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, also known as Graves' eye disease - have unveiled a dramatic new non-surgical treatment for Thyroid Eye Disease, one of the more serious symptoms of Graves' disease. Proof of the treatment's efficacy resulted from a 24 week treatment trial. The rationale for using Teprotumumab in thyroid eye disease was developed in Dr. Smith's laboratory over 20 years ago. The drug was repurposed from its initial target, cancer. It now has been designated by the FDA as a "breakthrough" therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease. This designation is reserved for drugs that are destined to radically change a specific field of medicine. A paper describing results of the clinical trial was published this month by the New England Journal of Medicine. A second trial is scheduled to begin enrolling participants later this Spring to further examine Teprotumumab's effectiveness. Several medical centers in the US and Europe will participate, including Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles, CA, La Peer Health Center in Beverly Hills, CA, and the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor, MI. Identification of Teprotumumab as a therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease represents an approach that will potentially replace surgery as a treatment for this condition. Teprotumumab is a monoclonal antibody that blocks a protein, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, thought to be involved in the disease process. Teprotumumab appears to stop the disease from progressing and may also reverse it. A total of 15 centers worldwide were involved in the initial trial that was just reported, making it the largest clinical study of a biologic agent in Thyroid Eye Disease. Drs. Smith and Douglas served as lead investigators on this recently concluded trial. Both investigators will also supervise the upcoming trial. An estimated 20 million Americans suffer from some form of thyroid disease. The most common form of hyperthyroidism in North America, Graves' disease, causes several characteristic symptoms including extreme anxiety and fatigue, hand tremors, increased perspiration, and weight loss. The disease is often associated with bulging of the eyes, medically referred to as ophthalmopathy, and affects up to 50% of patients with Graves' disease. Teprotumumab works to block molecules that target tissues around the eye and in the immune system that result in the bulging appearance of Graves' eye disease. The decades-long work conducted at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles and later at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor has succeeded in ushering in a truly game-changing treatment for thyroid eye disease. Not only might Teprotumumab replace surgery, the drug represents the first and only medicine that has been shown to reverse the disease in a double masked, placebo controlled clinical trial. Initial reaction from the medical community has been extremely positive. The authors believe that the drug will help many patients suffering from Graves' disease. "Cedars Sinai Medical Center is extremely proud to serve as a center for this extraordinary therapy," said Dr. Bruce L. Gewertz, M.D, Chair, Department of Surgery and Vice-Dean for Academic Affairs, Cedars-Sinai. Dr. Terry J. Smith, the Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Michigan, is an internationally-known endocrinologist who has studied Graves' disease, its eye manifestations, and related autoimmune disease for over 20 years. Dr. Smith's laboratory was first to describe the unique molecular attributes of tissue surrounding the eye that make it susceptible to inflammation in Graves' disease. Dr. Smith received his medical degree from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and completed his residency at the University of Illinois in Chicago and Sinai Hospital in Baltimore. He has completed fellowships in biophysics at the University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, in molecular biochemistry at Columbia University in New York, and clinical endocrinology at the Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago. Dr. Smith is the author of over 250 articles and book chapters, and has been awarded five patents for his research discoveries. He has been elected to the Orbit Society, is chief scientific officer for the National Graves' Foundation, and serves as reviewer for numerous scientific journals. Dr. Smith has been funded continuously by the National Institutes of Health and the Veterans Administration since 1983. Dr. Raymond Douglas is an experienced and board certified oculoplastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, CA. He specializes in reconstructive and aesthetic surgery. Patients with thyroid eye disease, previous unsuccessful surgery (blepharoplasty), cancers of the eyelids and face, and trauma-induced injuries all seek Dr. Douglas' expert care. Dr. Douglas also has a practice in Shanghai, China and is frequently asked to teach his novel techniques to other surgeons internationally. Prior to opening his private practice in Beverly Hills, he served as the director of the Thyroid Eye Disease Center at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. His expertise in treating thyroid-associated eye diseases and cosmetic and reconstruction surgeries has made him a highly respected and sought after physician. Currently, Dr. Douglas is the Director of the Orbital and Thyroid Eye Disease program at the prestigious Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Douglas has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and textbook chapters and his special interest in thyroid eye disease has led him to lecture on the topic on a national and international basis. He is also the author of the definitive textbook on the many facets of care for thyroid eye disease. Dr. Douglas has earned a reputation for his customized approach to rehabilitation, which has led to safer treatments with less scarring and significantly faster recoveries. He sees patients in southern California, nationally and internationally and is committed to providing each patient with an individualized treatment plan on how to best restore their health, vitality and appearance.


"The MMDx is a truly innovative way of assessing transplant rejection.  There is a lot of contention with the results from the current technology," said Dr. Jon Kobashigawa, Cardiologist and Director of the Heart Transplant Program at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. The MMDx system complements conventional biopsy processing to improve the assessment of rejection and injury in transplanted organs. In addition, it can provide theranostics support for drug development and use. Kashi Clinical Laboratories, Inc., a CLIA licensed CAP accredited laboratory located in Portland, Oregon, has recently adopted this technology. This Laboratory Based Service will be offered by Kashi in collaboration with TSI for processing of sample biopsies in the US. Kashi Clinical Laboratories is licensed in all states, including New York, California and Florida. Visit www.molecular-microscope.com for more information on the MMDX tests provided by Kashi Laboratories. One Lambda, a Thermo Fisher Scientific Brand, is the worldwide leader in HLA typing and antibody detection assays. Known for its commitment to quality, service, and innovation, the company develops and distributes several lines of HLA typing and antibody detection tests utilizing serological, molecular, ELISA, Flow, Luminex xMAP, & NGS technologies. In addition, One Lambda also manufactures laboratory instrumentation and computer software that are used to simplify and automate testing procedures and final test evaluations. For more information, please visit www.onelambda.com Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. is the world leader in serving science, with revenues of $18 billion and more than 55,000 employees globally. Our mission is to enable our customers to make the world healthier, cleaner and safer. We help our customers accelerate life sciences research, solve complex analytical challenges, improve patient diagnostics and increase laboratory productivity. Through our premier brands – Thermo Scientific, Applied Biosystems, Invitrogen, Fisher Scientific and Unity Lab Services – we offer an unmatched combination of innovative technologies, purchasing convenience and comprehensive support. For more information, please visit www.thermofisher.com To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/thermo-fisher-scientifics-one-lambda-brand-signs-exclusive-licensing-agreement-with-transcriptome-sciences-inc-for-access-to-molecular-microscope-diagnostic-system-300458149.html


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives. President Trump has been tweeting about how his version of health insurance will cover everyone, even those with pre-existing conditions. Jimmy Kimmel thinks it's insane that a parent has to worry whether they have enough money to save their child's life. Indeed, he wept through a 13-minute monologue on Monday as he told the story of his newborn son, Billy. Very soon after he was born on April 21, Billy turned a little purple. At first, Kimmel himself didn't notice. It took a nurse at Cedar-Sinai Hospital in LA to declare that something might be wrong. What followed was a series of doctors getting involved and surgery for Billy at the Children's Hospital in Los Angeles. Kimmel recounted the story of his son's life being saved -- with all the emotion of a parent. He tried to find space for humor. Referring to a long-time meme involving his (fake) feud with Matt Damon, he said: "Even that son of a bitch Matt Damon sent flowers." After minutes of thanks, Kimmel turned to the political nuances of his experience. "President Trump last month proposed a $6 billion cut in funding to the National Institute of Health and thank God our congressmen made a deal last night to not go along with that. They actually increased funding by $2 billion." He continued: "More than 40 percent of those who would have been affected by those cuts are children." "We were brought up to believe that we live in the greatest country in the world, but until a few years ago millions and millions of us had no access to health insurance at all," he said. "Before 2014, if you were born with congenital heart disease, like my son was, there was a good chance you'd never be able to get health insurance because you had a pre-existing condition." At this point, he began to break down. He said this was above politics. This was something all Americans should agree on. The states are supposed to be united. ABC released video of Kimmel's emotional monologue to YouTube, even before it aired on the west coast. Soon, it had amassed more than 100,000 viewers. As the battle for universal healthcare continues, and as scientists march to protest against any cuts in their funding, it's a fight for what some might see as basic humanity. It's harder for a society that has individualism at its core to accept the notion of anything universal. For Kimmel, however, the argument is simple: "No parent should ever have to decide if they can afford to save their child's life." Tech Enabled: CNET chronicles tech's role in providing new kinds of accessibility. Technically Literate: Original works of short fiction with unique perspectives on tech, exclusively on CNET.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"This agreement with some of Maryland's most respected health care organizations will ensure Evergreen's success for many years to come," said Dr. Peter Beilenson, CEO of Evergreen Health.  "I am especially pleased that our new partners share Evergreen's abiding goal: to provide Maryland residents with the highest-quality services at the most affordable prices." "We are proud to be partnering with Evergreen Health and are excited about the Company's future.  Evergreen is poised to become a leading health insurance provider in Maryland.  Evergreen now has the finances and partners to compete in the Maryland insurance market.  The combined strength of the investors will make Evergreen a new powerhouse that brings competition to the marketplace," said Dr. Scott Rifkin, one of JARS's principals. "The ability to offer insurance products has been a strategic imperative for Anne Arundel Medical Center for more than a decade, as it is an important factor in access to care and leads to improved health status and outcomes for the communities we serve," said Maulik Joshi, DrPH, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Anne Arundel Health System. "At LifeBridge Health, we believe in the power of partnership to improve the health of people in the communities we serve.  We are eager to work with JARS and Anne Arundel Health System to build on what Evergreen has started and to add to the diverse portfolio of health and health-related services that LifeBridge Health provides," said Neil Meltzer, President and CEO of LifeBridge Health. JARS is an investment group formed and funded by some of Maryland's top healthcare executives specifically to support Evergreen Health's mission of providing health insurance to Maryland residents. Anne Arundel Health System includes a 380-bed not-for-profit hospital (Anne Arundel Medical Center), a medical group, imaging services, a substance use treatment center, and health enterprises. In addition to a 95-acre Annapolis campus, Anne Arundel Medical Center has outpatient pavilions in Bowie, Kent Island, Odenton, Pasadena and Waugh Chapel. LifeBridge Health is one of the largest, most comprehensive providers of health services in Maryland. LifeBridge Health includes Sinai Hospital, Northwest Hospital, Carroll Hospital, Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital, and related subsidiaries and affiliates. Evergreen Health was represented by Funk and Bolton. The investors were represented by Nemphos Braue LLC, Neuberger Quinn Gielen Rubin Gibber P.A. and Epstein Becker Green P.C. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/investor-group-agrees-to-acquisition-of-evergreen-health-300448652.html


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DETROIT--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Yesterday, the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) recognized the winners of its sixth annual Quality Education and Safe Systems Training (QuESST) Graduate Medical Education Research Day competition. This year's first place winners and their project titles were: Dr. Fazeena Shanaz, ”A quality improvement initiative to lower hba1c and to improve outcomes in patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus in the outpatient primary care clinic;”; Dr. Allie Dakroub, “Patient Centered Interdisciplinary Bed Rounding”; and Medical Student Mohamed Salar, “Analyzing Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection in Robotic-assisted Arthroplasty Knee Surgeries: A Case-Control Study.” QuESST is a comprehensive program designed to increase the knowledge and application of patient safety best practices and quality improvement methods of DMC's Graduate Medical Education (GME) program participants. Each year, QuESST sponsors a conference highlighting more than 100 quality improvement projects produced by its participants. This year, 92 residents and fellows and 15 medical students from 42 programs at the DMC presented before Wayne State University School of Medicine and Michigan State College of Osteopathic Medicine faculty judges. "Our GME trainees’ persistence in asking the tough questions that will drive solutions for providing the safest and highest quality care for every patient who comes through our doors is what makes our annual QuESST program so successful," says Heidi Kromrei, PhD, assistant vice president of Academic Affairs at the DMC. The 2017 QuESST GME Resident Research Day showcased projects that recognized a variety of patient safety and quality improvement efforts conducted in clinical settings throughout the DMC over the past year. "Our QuESST participants have historically made significant contributions at the DMC," says Dr. Suzanne White, DMC CAO and CMO. "Their high impact work has translated to better care for patients, families and the community at large." During the half-day event, students discussed their projects with other students, residents, faculty and hospital administrators who, in turn, offered thoughtful feedback regarding opportunity for project expansion or enhancement. The QuESST program is designed to assist medical students and residents in further developing critical thinking and medical knowledge application while strengthening their leadership, communication and collaboration skills. The Detroit Medical Center operates eight hospitals and institutes, including Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Receiving Hospital, Harper University Hospital, Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital, Hutzel Women’s Hospital, Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan, Sinai-Grace Hospital, and DMC Heart Hospital. The Detroit Medical Center is a leading regional health care system with a mission of excellence in clinical care, research and medical education. The Detroit Medical Center is proud to be the Official Healthcare Services Provider of the Detroit Tigers, Detroit Red Wings and Detroit Pistons. For more information, visit www.dmc.org. "Like" us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/dmcheals, follow us on Twitter at @dmc_heals or check out our YouTube page at www.youtube.com/DetroitMedicalCenter.

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