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Newark, NJ, United States

Trademark
Simphotek, Inc. | Date: 2011-06-14

Computer software for CAD-based modeling of photonic interactions of light with materials and devices, and for use in the design and optimization of photonic materials and devices.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2009

Sophisticated optical computer-aided-design (CAD) software is needed to greatly reduce the time and money required to design new optical materials and devices.  For example, new optical materials are desired in order to protect personnel and sensors from intense laser beams.  Many other military and non-military applications, such as laser communications, light-based medical diagnostics and therapies and the design of new optical devices, also require a detailed understanding of the linear and nonlinear interactions of light with materials that can be obtained by utilizing optical CAD software.  Phase I demonstrated the feasibility of designing optical CAD software that divides the computation of complicated light-matter interactions into a series of simple modules or blocks.  Each block is related to a single optical excitation or relaxation process in the material.  This modular approach can greatly simplify computer modeling of light-material interactions.  In Phase II, prototype computer software based on this modular approach will be developed, tested and validated by comparison to experimental results.  The new software will have a general purpose computational algorithm and a graphical user interface (GUI) that allows material and experimental input parameters to be easily modified. BENEFIT: Anticipated benefits include the development of prototype engineering and scientific computer-aided-design (CAD) software that can be utilized by the Air Force, other branches of the Department of Defense, research institutions and industry. The software can be used to design and/or analyze optical materials and devices for the protection of personnel and equipment from intense laser beams and for applications in medical diagnostics, therapeutics and biosensors that utilize lasers or other light sources.  The software can greatly reduce the time and cost of the R&D effort.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.20K | Year: 2016

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Photodynamic therapy PDT provides for standalone or intraoperative cancer treatment PDT provides a means to treat superficial and or residual disease while minimizing damage to underlying tissues and does not exhibit cumulative cell toxicities distinguishing it from radiation therapy As compared to radiotherapy treatment planning in PDT is often approached in a one size fits all fashion However patient and tumor specific factors such as tissue optical properties and photosensitizer PS levels are critical to the delivery of effective light doses The development of treatment dosimetry tools tha take into account these factors will fill an unmet clinical need and provide for individualized patient treatment An effective PDT treatment dosimetry system stands to improve therapeutic outcomes reduce the need for repeat PDT or additional cell killing therapy and could therefore reduce overall costs in the per patient delivery of cancer related therapy and care The major objective of this SBIR Phase II proposal is to develop and verify prototype software and hardware tools that combine simulations of PS photophysics with light propagation using fast Monte Carlo MC techniques The research of this Phase II SBIR will result in unique prototype dosimetry tools that will be further developed and commercialized in Phase III for use by PDT physicians and researchers to improve patient outcomes This Phase II SBIR has three major aims Aim is to develop prototype software for PDT dosimetry combining light transport using fast Monte Carlo MC techniques and patient PS variability The software should be fast enough for future clinical use in Phase III of this project At the foundation of this system will e Simphotekandapos s novel Active Photonics Building Blocks APBB algorithm with its simple graphical user interface for active photophysics The APBB breaks the computing problem for photophysics into a series of computational building blocks that the software automatically combines to generate the full numerical simulation To include light scattering in the analysis Simphotek has partnered with Tech X Corporation Tech X subaward a leader in the field of high performance computing Tech X has developed MC based scattering infrastructure and has adapted the code in Phase I to model light diffusion and absorption processes in biological tissue The Aim objective is for Tech X and Simphotek to develop a prototype PDT dosimetry tool combining both the software developed in Aim and specialized hardware for high speed simulations Aim is to verify the software hardware simulations by comparing the simulation results to phantom measurements done at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Penn subaward by experts in PDT PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE A critical barrier to continued progress in photodynamic therapy PDT cancer treatments is the general lack of effective treatment dosimetry tools that can provide for individualized patient treatments Our multidisciplinary team proposes to fill this unmet need by greatly improving the computational methods for PDT and subsequently developing unique prototype treatment dosimetry tools that can be easily utilized by PDT physicians and researchers An effective PDT treatment dosimetry system stands to improve patient outcomes reduce the need for repeat PDT or additional cell killing therapy and could therefore reduce overall costs in the per patient delivery of cancer related therapy and care


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.88K | Year: 2007

New photoactivated optical materials and devices are needed for many high-performance applications and are generally very costly and time-consuming to develop. The Air Force, for example, needs new optical materials in order to protect personnel, sensors and satellites from intense laser beams. Many other military and non-military applications, such as light-based medical diagnostics and therapies and the design of new optical devices, also require a detailed understanding of the linear and non-linear interactions of light with materials. Computer-aided design software can greatly reduce the time and money needed for the development process. In order to simplify computer modeling of light-material interactions, the feasibility of developing new simulation algorithms that are based on a modular approach with be investigated. The proposed approach can allow general purpose algorithms to be constructed that can be easily modified to account for changing optical material properties such as additional energy levels or additional excitation or relaxation pathways.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2014

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for treating a variety of medical conditions including cancer. Even after many years of PDT research and the large-scale use of PDT treatments by physicians, there are many aspects ofPDT, such as quantitative predictions for diffusive light propagation and the kinetics of the light-material interactions, that are not well understood. This can lead to a large variation in treatment results In particular, the dosimetry for treatments ischallenging and it is difficult to determine the lasr light energies and the photosensitizer (PS) concentrations that are optimal. In this Phase I SBIR, Simphotek (prime institution), Tech-X (subaward institution) and University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, i.e. UPenn (subaward institution) will investigate the feasibility of experimentally (UPenn) and computationally (Simphotek/Tech-X) guiding novel and easy-to-use mathematical and numerical methods for PDT. The software product(s) that result

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