The Simon Winter Institute for Human Genetics

Haifa, Israel

The Simon Winter Institute for Human Genetics

Haifa, Israel
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Gilbar R.,Netanya Academic College | Shalev S.,The Genetic Institute | Spiegel R.,Emek Medical Center | Pras E.,The Danek Gertner Institute of Human Genetics | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Genetic Counseling | Year: 2016

Many factors predict the intention to disclose genetic information to relatives. The article examines the impact of patients’ socio-demographic factors on their intention to disclose genetic testing results to their relatives. Data were collected in eight genetic clinics in Israel. Patients were requested to fill in a questionnaire after counseling. A convenience sample of 564 participants who visited these clinics was collected for a response rate of 85 %. Of them, 282 participants came for susceptibility testing for hereditary cancers (cancer group), and 282 for genetic screening tests (prenatal group). In the cancer group, being secular and having more years of education correlated positively with the intention to disclose test results to relatives. In the prenatal group, being married and female correlated positively with the intention to disclose. In the cancer group, being religious and with less years of education correlated positively with the view that the clinician should deliver the results to the family. In the prenatal group, being male and unmarried correlated positively with this belief. In both groups, being of young age correlated with the perception that genetic information is private. Varied sociodemographic factors affect the intention to inform family members. Thus, knowing the social background of patients will shed light on people’s attitudes to genetic information and will help clinicians provide effective counseling in discussions with patients about the implications of test results for relatives. © 2015, National Society of Genetic Counselors, Inc.


PubMed | Emek Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, The Simon Winter Institute for Human Genetics, The Danek Gertner Institute of Human Genetics and 6 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of genetic counseling | Year: 2016

Many factors predict the intention to disclose genetic information to relatives. The article examines the impact of patients socio-demographic factors on their intention to disclose genetic testing results to their relatives. Data were collected in eight genetic clinics in Israel. Patients were requested to fill in a questionnaire after counseling. A convenience sample of 564 participants who visited these clinics was collected for a response rate of 85 %. Of them, 282 participants came for susceptibility testing for hereditary cancers (cancer group), and 282 for genetic screening tests (prenatal group). In the cancer group, being secular and having more years of education correlated positively with the intention to disclose test results to relatives. In the prenatal group, being married and female correlated positively with the intention to disclose. In the cancer group, being religious and with less years of education correlated positively with the view that the clinician should deliver the results to the family. In the prenatal group, being male and unmarried correlated positively with this belief. In both groups, being of young age correlated with the perception that genetic information is private. Varied sociodemographic factors affect the intention to inform family members. Thus, knowing the social background of patients will shed light on peoples attitudes to genetic information and will help clinicians provide effective counseling in discussions with patients about the implications of test results for relatives.


Melamed O.,Beilinson Hospital | Behar D.M.,Beilinson Hospital | Behar D.M.,Molecular Medicine Laboratory | Bram C.,Michigan State University | And 11 more authors.
Clinical Genetics | Year: 2015

Huntington disease (HD), an autosomal dominant disorder involving HTT, is characterized by chorea, psychiatric illness and cognitive decline. Diagnosis and age of onset depend on the degree of expansion of the trinucleotide CAG repeat within the gene. The prevalence of HD is known for Europeans but has not been studied in the Israeli population. Between 2006 and 2011 we diagnosed in our adult genetics clinic ten HD probands, nine of whom were Caucasus Jews (CJ) (Azerbaijani), and one Ashkenazi Jewish. We performed haplotype analysis to look for evidence of a founder mutation, and found that of the nine CJ, eight shared the same haplotype that was compatible with the A1 haplogroup. We calculated the coalescence age of the mutation to be between 80 and 150years. Ninety percent of our HD patients are CJ, as are 27% of the HD patients in Israel, although the CJ comprise only 1.4% of the Israeli population. Our findings suggest a higher prevalence of HD among CJ compared to the general Israeli population and are consistent with a recent founder mutation. We recommend a higher degree of suspicion for HD in CJ with subtle clinical findings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


PubMed | Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Tel Aviv University, IVF Unit, The Simon Winter Institute for Human Genetics and Haifa University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of human genetics : EJHG | Year: 2014

BRCA mutation carriers were reported to display a skewed distribution of FMR1 genotypes, predominantly within the low normal range (CGG repeat number <26). This observation led to the interpretation that BRCA1/2 mutations are embryo-lethal, unless rescued by low FMR1 alleles. We undertook to re-explore the distribution of FMR1 alleles subdivided into low, normal and high (<26, 26-34, and >34 CGG repeats, respectively) subgenotypes, on a cohort of 125 Ashkenazi women, carriers of a BRCA1/2 founder mutation. Ashkenazi healthy females (n=368), tested in the frame of the Israeli screening population program, served as controls. BRCA1/2 carriers and controls demonstrated a comparable and non-skewed FMR1 subgenotype distribution. Taken together, using a homogeneous ethnic group of Ashkenazi BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, we could not confirm the reported association between FMR1 low genotypes and BRCA1/2 mutations. The notion that BRCA1/2 mutations are embryo-lethal unless rescued by the low FMR1 subgenotypes is hereby refuted.

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