Clifton Park, NY, United States
Clifton Park, NY, United States
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Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.39K | Year: 2014

Additive Manufacturing (AM), where three-dimensional (3D) objects are created from a digital model by depositing and fusing successive layers of material, provides the ability to produce low-volume, customized products with complex geometries relatively quickly at a moderate cost. However, AM processes sometimes fail to produce acceptable parts, due to either geometric in- accuracy (e.g., shrinkage or warping) or unacceptable material properties, and it is not currently possible to determine a priori whether a process will fail or not. This significantly increases the costs associated with using AM. The overall objective is to develop automated simulation tools for modeling AM processes that accurately predict part geometry and state, such as residual stresses, porosity, and microstructural features related to part quality, for given AM processing conditions, with a focus on Selective Laser Melting (SLM). Such a simulation capability would allow AM system developers and users to try proposed process plans in simulation first. We also plan to develop inverse methods and control strategies using the simulation tools for process design and control. While the pro- posed project will develop tools for SLM, the basic architecture can be extended to a larger family of AM processes. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: This project will produce an advanced simulation system for modeling AM processes that will allow AM equipment manufacturers to produce better systems, increasing the efficiency and reducing the cost of AM. The core technologies developed in this project will be general and will be applicable for use with a wide variety of applications, thus providing benefits past AM applications. Simulation is widely used in the design processes of a large number of industries, including aerospace, electronics, energy, biomedical, and consumer goods; the core tools that Simmetrix provides are already advancing industrys ability to perform predictive analysis and design for complex engineering systems in a time- and cost-effective manner.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.72K | Year: 2013

Integrally bladed rotors (IBR), also called blisks, are becoming increasingly common in the compressor and fan sections of modern turbine engines. The integration of the blades and disks into a single part has the advantages of reduced part count, reduced weight, increased reliability, and increased performance. However, a drawback of this technology is that individual blades cannot be easily replaced and thus blending is typically used to resolve minor damage to blades. Blending involves removing material around the damaged area to reduce the stress concentrations that could lead to cracking and subsequent failure. But this process also changes the mechanical, dynamic, and aerodynamic properties of the blisk. This project will combine the expertise of Simmetrix, Duke University and GE to create a system to model the effects of introducing blends into a blisk, giving the ability to accurately predict the structural and aerodynamic effects of such a repair. By being able to model these effects, the blend shape and size can be optimized minimizing the impacts on the performance and reliability of the engine.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 991.33K | Year: 2015

Additive Manufacturing (AM), where three-dimensional (3D) objects are created from a digital model by depositing and fusing successive layers of material, provides the ability to produce low-volume, customized products with complex geometries relatively quickly at a moderate cost. However, AM processes sometimes fail to produce acceptable parts, due to either geometric in- accuracy (e.g., shrinkage or warping) or unacceptable material properties, and it is not currently possible to determine a priori whether a process will fail or not. This significantly increases the costs associated with using AM. The overall objective is to develop automated simulation tools for modeling AM processes that accurately predict part geometry and state, such as residual stresses, porosity, and microstructural features related to part quality, for given AM processing conditions, with a focus on Selective Laser Melting (SLM). Such a simulation capability would allow AM system developers and users to try proposed process plans in simulation first. We also plan to develop inverse methods and control strategies using the simulation tools for process design and control. While the pro- posed project will develop tools for SLM, the basic architecture can be extended to a larger family of AM processes. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: This project will produce an advanced simulation system for modeling AM processes that will allow AM equipment manufacturers to produce better systems, increasing the efficiency, and reducing the cost of AM. The core technologies developed in this project will be general and will be applicable for use with a wide variety of applications, thus providing benefits past AM applications. Simulation is widely used in the design processes of a large number of industries, including aerospace, electronics, energy, biomedical, and consumer goods; the core tools that Simmetrix provides are already advancing industrys ability to perform predictive analysis and design for complex engineering systems in a time- and cost-effective manner.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 599.24K | Year: 2011

The ability to quickly and reliably simulate high-speed flows over a wide range of geometrically complex configurations is critical to many of NASA's missions. Advances in CFD methods and parallel computing have provided NASA the core flow solvers to perform these simulations. However, the ease of use of these flow solvers and the reliability of the results obtained are a strong function of the technologies used to discretize the domain. Many applications involve solutions with highly anisotropic features: boundary layers, shear layers, wakes, shocks etc. Efficient resolution of those features motivates matching the mesh resolution/anisotropy to the solution's anisotropy but, in the more challenging applications, the location and strength of those features is difficult to precisely estimate prior to solution. Currently available meshing tools are not capable of producing and controlling the required initial meshes, nor adapting the mesh to match evolving anisotropic features. This project will combine Simmetrix Inc. expertise in the development of meshing components for flow simulations, and Rensselaer's Scientific Computation Research Center expertise in the development of adaptive mesh control technologies, to provide NASA the mesh generation and adaptation technologies needed. New techniques will be developed to create highly anisotropic semi-structured and unstructured meshes suitable for CFD simulations with high Reynolds number flow features (e.g., boundary layers, bow shocks, free shear layers, wakes, contact surfaces). Techniques to adapt these meshes based on mesh correction indicators will be developed to enable fully automated adaptive simulations. All procedures to be developed will work effectively in parallel on large-scale parallel computers and will support a wide range of flow solvers. The overall capabilities will be demonstrated through execution of fully automated parallel adaptive simulations on problems relevant to NASA.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.13K | Year: 2015

This project will develop methods, and their implementation into software components, to support the reliable simulation of multiphase ballistic flows of importance to the design of firearms. Building on the advanced meshing technologies and finite element based multiphase flow technologies the project team has developed to date, this project will address the additional capabilities needed which include: Tracking evolving multiphase flow geometries in parallel. Parallel generation and adaptation of near optimal anisotropic meshes on evolving geometries. Modeling the physics of multiphase ballistic flows using an effective combination of mathematical models and discretization methods. Demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods developed to address multiphase ballistics flows of interest to the Army.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.27K | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT: The overall objective of this project is to develop scalable simulation components that effectively model the meso-scale physics of heterogeneous energetic materials subject to dynamic shock loading including matrix debonding, void collapse, and damage due to crystal to crystal interactions, and bridges the meso-scale to the macro-scale for system scale simulations of the transition to detonation. Specific technical developments required to accomplish this include: Geometry construction and meshing of meso-scale structures with the capability of updating for evolving geometries and mesh adaptivity to handle debonding and fracture. Appropriate models of the physical processes including models of material and interface behavior under shock conditions. Procedures for accurate, efficient, and scalable thermal-mechanical simulations of the meso-scale behavior built on robust finite element software. ; BENEFIT: By developing the simulation tool as a set of functional components that interact through well defined interfaces there will be the opportunity to apply them to a wide range problems characterized by evolving meso-scale structures which is at the core of a wide range of material design problems. In addition a number of the components developed will be applicable to other areas of application in which careful tracking of meso-scale structures are important such as biological systems.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.97K | Year: 2015

The development of simulation tool to model magnetically confined plasmas requires consider- ing multiple overlapping scales. Continuum models address full reactor scale behaviors, while particle models are focused on fine scale behavior. The complex combinations of physics and geometrically complex reactors result in simulations involving massive calculations and data sets, which can only be executed on parallel computers. Thus, there is a critical need for effective methods that can execute coupled simulations with fully parallel representations, and computa- tions, at both the continuum and particle level with specific consideration of the ability to per- form validation with experimentally measured data. The goal of this project is to develop struc- tures and tools for multiscale plasma simulations that provide a parallel mesh and particle infra- structure, data analysis operations to support validation, geometry and meshing methods, meth- ods for scalably coupled mesh and particle operations, and a user interface for specification of the fusion plasma simulation workflows.This project will develop specific component tools needed to enable multiscale fusion plasma simulations on full reactor geometries. The technical developments will address: A parallel infrastructure that supports the scalable execution of simulations that involve a combination of continuum and particle analysis tools. Structures and methods to support the large data analysis operations involved with the execution of quantified validation processes. Specialized geometry and meshing techniques. Tools for execution of the multiscale simulations. A customizable user interface for the effective definition of the simulation workflows. The combined mesh plus particle methods to be developed in this project will provide a set com- ponents that can support the development new generations of multiscale/multiphysics simula- tions needed in the modeling of fusion and fission reactors, and for application in nuclear medi- cine. The core methods to be developed will also of great use in the development of a number of engineering simulation areas such as modeling the liquefaction of soils.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 518.95K | Year: 2011

The focus of this SBIR project is to provide the technologies needed to go from image data of material microstructures to geometric models representations, and associated meshes of those geometries, that will support the effective application of engineering modeling and simulation to predict the physical properties and behavior of energetic materials. The technologies to be developed will combine advanced image segmentation methods with knowledge of the basic engineering properties of the constituent materials to provide microstructural geometric models that are relevant to engineering analyses. The resulting geometric models will them be automatically and adaptively meshed as needed to support their accurate analysis by finite element and/or finite volume methods. Procedures will be provided to create the input and adaptive control methods for both Lagrangian and Eulerian based mathematical formulations and software. This project will also provide an interactive user environment that will support the addition of new information on material constituent properties and mesh control into the process.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 698.65K | Year: 2012

Researchers at SLAC ACD have developed a new generation of high-order finite element procedures for electromagnetic analyses that can effectively simulation new accelerator designs. These same analysis procedures are well suited for electromagnetic applications ranging from threat detection, to antenna de- sign, to wireless device design, to the treatment of cancer. Cost effective massively parallel computers, coupled with advanced computational tools, such as those that can be provided by combination of ACE3P and Simmetrix tools, can make virtual prototyping for electromagnetic applications a reality. The objectives of the proposed SBIR are to: Provide the unstructured mesh generation and adaptation tools required to create and control curved meshes of 1 billions of element running on massively parallel computers. Combine these mesh generation and adaptation tools with the SLAC parallel finite element analysis tools and, to be developed, mesh correction indicators to construct automated adaptive electromagnetic simulations that operate effectively on massively parallel computers. Develop an interactive user environment to support accelerator designers in the definition and execution of accelerator simulations. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: A summary of the general benefits expected as a result of this project, and continued development, include: Providing the developers of accelerators with a set of easy to use tools capable of providing reliable simulation results. Provide a set of electromagnetic simulation tools that operate on large scale parallel computers including moving toward the next generations of computers pushing to exascale. Speeding the development of new simulation tools within the DOE and other research organizations. Provide industry with the means to apply new simulation technologies in the design and production of new products for a broad range of industries from aerospace to consumer products.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 989.02K | Year: 2016

The simulation of magnetically confined plasmas requires considering multiple overlapping scales. Continuum models address reactor scale behaviors, while particle methods capture fine scale behavior. The complex combination of physics and reactor geometry results in simulations involving massive calculations and data sets, which can only be executed on parallel computers. Thus, there is a critical need for effective methods that can execute coupled simulations with fully parallel representations, and computations, at both the continuum and particle level with specific consideration of the ability to perform validation with experimentally measured data. The goal of this project is to develop structures and tools for multiscale plasma simulations that provide a parallel mesh and particle infrastructure, data analysis operations to support validation, geometry and meshing methods, methods for scalably coupled mesh and particle operations, and a user interface for specification of the fusion plasma simulation workflows. What was done in Phase I: A parallel mesh with particles infrastructure was defined and implemented including the procedures needed to support particle simulations. Preliminary support for particle simulations were added to a fusion plasma code using these methods. Data analysis methods have been initiated to support verification, validation and quantity of interest evaluation. The fusion device mesh generation procedure had been extended and a graphical user interface added. What was planned for Phase II Project? The parallel mesh with particle infrastructure will continue to be advanced with emphasis on using it to full advantage in two fusion plasma codes accounting for the needs of many core and accelerator supported nodes on massively parallel systems. This will include the full implementation of the new partitioning method defined in Phase I. The data analysis methods will be expanded to support the execution of uncertainty quantification operations. Mesh generation methods for stellarator devices will be developed. The graphical user interface will be extended to support the specification of uncertainty quantification operations. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The combined mesh plus particle methods to be developed will provide a set components that can support the new generations of multiscale/multi physics simulations needed in the modeling of fusion and fission reactors, and for application in nuclear medicine. The core methods to be developed will also of great use in the development of a number of engineering simulation areas such as modeling of additive manufacturing processes, the liquefaction of soils, etc. Key Words: Parallel simulation, simulation workflows, parallel geometry, mesh generation, mesh adaptivity

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