Entity

Time filter

Source Type

SHEFFIELD, United Kingdom

Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2011.4.2-1 | Award Amount: 5.52M | Year: 2011

The aim of TAIN is to develop a neonatal formulation of hydrocortisone, a drug included in the EMA priority list that needs specific evaluation in the age range 0 2 years (neonates & infants). Hydrocortisone is an essential glucocorticoid hormone used as replacement therapy for the treatment of congenital and acquired adrenal insufficiency as well playing an important therapeutic role in oncology in infants, specifically brain tumours and leukaemias. TAIN involves European leaders in neonatology, paediatric pharmacology, methodology and SMEs that will establish links with ethical bodies and regulatory authorities. The programme will perform in silico experiments and evaluate formulations for neonates. The phase 3 clinical trial comparing the neonatal hydrocortisone versus current (unlicensed) therapy will be optimized using age-appropriate state-of-the-art methods adapted to neonates (including in silico experiments and pharmacokinetics) to validate the components of a Paediatric Investigation Plan. It will be performed by neonatologists trained in paediatric pharmacology and clinical research in line with guidelines on Good Clinical Practice. All the ethical issues will be considered, including pain and distress, blood sampling (number and volume) and informed consent. Parent information sheets and consent form will be submitted to patient and parents associations for approval. TAIN will include short term safety studies and Phase 3 clinical studies in neonates and infants. Results will be reported in order to allow a PUMA application to be submitted and to improve neonatal and infant care. Therefore, TAIN will validate the appropriate use of hydrocortisone in neonates and infants which will be of direct benefit to children, their families and health professionals. TAIN will strengthen paediatric drug evaluation across Europe and build up a network of units with experience in clinical research that will be used for additional drug evaluation in neonates.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-1.3-1 | Award Amount: 16.43M | Year: 2008

The overall aim of Predict-IV is to develop strategies to improve the assessment of drug safety in the early stage of development and late discovery phase, by an intelligent combination of non animal-based test systems, cell biology, mechanistic toxicology and in-silico modelling, in a rapid and cost effective manner. A better prediction of the safety of an investigational compound in early development will be delivered. Margins-of-safety will be deduced and the data generated by the proposed approach may also identify early biomarkers of human toxicity for pharmaceuticals. The results obtained in Predict-IV will enable pharmaceutical companies to create a tailored testing strategy for early drug safety. The project will integrate new developments to improve and optimize cell culture models for toxicity testing and to characterize the dynamics and kinetics of cellular responses to toxic effects in vitro. The target organs most frequently affected by drug toxicity will be taken into account, namely liver and kidney. Moreover, predictive models for neurotoxicty are scarce and will be developed. For each target organ the most appropriate cell model will be used. The approach will be evaluated using a panel of drugs with well described toxicities and kinetics in animals and partly also in humans. This approach will be highly advantageous as it will allow a direct comparison between the in vivo to the in vitro data. A parallel analysis of several dynamic and kinetic models with a broad spectrum of endpoints should allow for the identification of several relevant biomarkers of toxicity. Inter-individual susceptibilities will be taken into account by integrating the polymorphisms of the major drug metabolizing enzymes and correlating the observed effects in the human cell models with their genotype. Environmental influences on cellular toxicity to these compounds will also be evaluated using hypoxic stress as a relevant test model.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-33-2015 | Award Amount: 30.12M | Year: 2016

The vision of EU-ToxRisk is to drive a paradigm shift in toxicology towards an animal-free, mechanism-based integrated approach to chemical safety assessment. The project will unite all relevant disciplines and stakeholders to establish: i) pragmatic, solid read-across procedures incorporating mechanistic and toxicokinetic knowledge; and ii) ab initio hazard and risk assessment strategies of chemicals with little background information. The project will focus on repeated dose systemic toxicity (liver, kidney, lung and nervous system) as well as developmental/reproduction toxicity. Different human tiered test systems are integrated to balance speed, cost and biological complexity. EU-ToxRisk extensively integrates the adverse outcome pathway (AOP)-based toxicity testing concept. Therefore, advanced technologies, including high throughput transcriptomics, RNA interference, and high throughput microscopy, will provide quantitative and mechanistic underpinning of AOPs and key events (KE). The project combines in silico tools and in vitro assays by computational modelling approaches to provide quantitative data on the activation of KE of AOP. This information, together with detailed toxicokinetics data, and in vitro-in vivo extrapolation algorithms forms the basis for improved hazard and risk assessment. The EU-ToxRisk work plan is structured along a broad spectrum of case studies, driven by the cosmetics, (agro)-chemical, pharma industry together with regulators. The approach involves iterative training, testing, optimization and validation phases to establish fit-for-purpose integrated approaches to testing and assessment with key EU-ToxRisk methodologies. The test systems will be combined to a flexible service package for exploitation and continued impact across industry sectors and regulatory application. The proof-of-concept for the new mechanism-based testing strategy will make EU-ToxRisk the flagship in Europe for animal-free chemical safety assessment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.4.2-1 | Award Amount: 6.54M | Year: 2011

The aim of TINN2 is to evaluate azithromycin, included in the EMEA priority list of the therapeutic areas that need specific drug evaluation in preterm and term neonates. Azithromycin is a macrolid antibiotic with anti-inflammatory properties active against Ureaplasma. It might be effective in reducing the severity of bronhopulmonary disease in which Ureaplasma infection and inflammation play a role. TINN2 involves European leaders in neonatology, paediatric pharmacology, methodology and SMEs that will establish links with ethical bodies and regulatory authorities. The programme will perform in silico experiments and evaluate formulations for neonates. The randomized placebo-controlled trial will be optimized using age-appropriate state-of-the-art methods adapted to neonates (including in silico experiments, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics) to validate the components of a Paediatric Investigation Plan. It will be performed by neonatologists trained in paediatric pharmacology and clinical research in line with guidelines on Good Clinical Practice. All the ethical issues will be considered, including pain and distress, blood sampling (number and volume) and informed consent. Parent information sheets and consent form will be submitted to parents associations for approval. TINN2 will include short term safety and potential for long term adverse reactions. Results will be reported in order to allow a PUMA application and to improve neonatal care. Therefore, TINN2 will validate the appropriate use of azithromycin in neonates which will be of direct benefit to children, their families and health professionals. TINN2 will strengthen paediatric drug evaluation across Europe, support recent initiatives from the European pharmaceutical industry and build up a network of units with experience in clinical research that will be used for additional drug evaluation in neonates.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-2.2.1-4 | Award Amount: 4.19M | Year: 2010

Brain diseases are one of the most prevalent groups of diseases in Europe with estimated annual costs amounting to 386 billion (1). Data collected by the WHO suggest that brain diseases are responsible for 35% of Europes total disease burden (1). In the treatment of neurological disease, the blood brain barrier (BBB) still represents an obstacle for the delivery of drugs to the brain and thus a major challenge for the development of therapeutic regimens. Understanding the molecular basis and functioning of the BBB in health and disease, including transport mechanisms across the BBB, therefore holds significant potential for future strategies to prevent and ameliorate neurological disease. Recent research indicates that some neurological disorders have a developmental etiologic component. The major goal of the NEUROBID project is thus to understand the molecular mechanisms and function of the BBB in health and disease both in the developing brain and the adult central nervous system. With an interdisciplinary consortium from the fields of developmental neurobiology and BBB research, NEUROBID aims to (i) understand the involvement of normal and disturbed BBB function in normal and abnormal brain development and (ii) to develop novel strategies for drug delivery to the brain. Unique transport mechanisms across the BBB will be used to target potential therapeutic macromolecular and cellular agents specifically to the brain barriers and transport them into the brain. The main target disorders of NEUROBID are non-inherited neurodevelopmental disorders arising from perinatal adverse exposure, such as cerebral palsy, and classic adult neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis and stroke. In the long term, NEUROBID hopes to pave the way for new treatment strategies and thus reduce the economic and social burden of neurological disease. 1. Olesen J, et al. Consensus document on European brain research. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2006;77 Suppl 1:i1-49.

Discover hidden collaborations