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Lebanon, NH, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.06M | Year: 2014

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates the yearly incidence of mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) at approximately 1.2 million cases in the United States alone. Approximately 1/3 of these injuries occur in football. The Principal Objective of this NIH Phase IIb SBIR project is to expand the utility of the current, and now commercially available, InSite impact alert monitoring system developed in Phase I/Phase II to integrate long-term player specific head impactexposure tracking for identifying both at- risk impacts (i.e. on-field alerting) and high-risk behavior (i.e. poor tackling technique). Brain injur is difficult to see , particularly on the field. We have successfully developed a sideline tool that can identify atypical impacts or series of impacts in the field that can be used to trigger management of concussion on the sideline. What is currently lacking is the ability to identify high-risk behavior that may eventually lead to concussion. The propose


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 820.81K | Year: 2008

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This goal of this SBIR project is to quantify and validate the feasibility and potential for a non- obtrusive, wearable, in-shoe gait-monitoring device for children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). It is hypothesized that continuous monitoring and analysis of simple gait parameters in children with CP outside the clinical laboratory and during normal daily activities will provide clinically useful outcomes data that are not currently available and critical diagnostic data for determining intervention timing. There is a clinical need for objective, quantitative data to assess the severity of toe walking and its progression over time as the child develops and intervention strategies are implemented to improve his/her mobility. Also, extending such assessment to the home and community settings is critical in order to allow clinicians to evaluate whether clinical interventions are effective in improving mobility outside of the clinic and overall the quality of life of the child. The key innovation is the development of a miniature extremely low-power data acquisition/recording device, which can be worn non-obtrusively by children with CP during activities of daily living (ADL's) to measure ankle angle and center of pressure trajectories during ambulation. In Phase I, hardware/software development and validation will be followed by a pilot study of children with CP to compare measured in-shoe gait parameters against gold- standard laboratory kinematic and kinetic data. Data clustering techniques will be employed to determine the feasibility of classifying these motor tasks from the in-shoe monitoring data alone, and to identify different ambulatory activities (i.e. level walking, ramp ascending and descending, and stair ascending and descending). In Phase II, the hardware is incorporated into the sole of a sneaker, a multi-stage classifier is developed and validated, and a pilot longitudinal study is performed to evaluate the development of a novel Toe Walking Severity (TWS) index. The long-term goal of this research and development project is to address clinical problems associated with objective quantification of gait abnormalities and the success of clinical interventions by developing low cost, readily available in-shoe monitoring tools and analysis methods to quantify longitudinally the severity of toe walking outside the clinic environment. If successful, the proposed technology carries significant potential for monitoring gait in patients affected by other pathologies in which gait parameters are expected to change over time as a function of the progression of the disease (e.g. shuffling in patients with Parkinson's disease, progressive loss of ankle control in patients with multiple sclerosis). The proposed ActiveGait device provides the enabling technology to continuously monitor toe walking at home. Outcome measures quantifying the success and timing of clinical interventions for toe walking will be developed based on extremely large data gathered from the individual's walking at home and over long periods of time. If technically and economically feasible, the additional up-front cost of the monitoring system in the shoe will be far outweighed by reduced health care costs associated with treatment and rehabilitation for toe walking.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 969.03K | Year: 2010

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates the yearly incidence of mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) at approximately 1.2 million cases in the United States alone. Approximately 1/3 of these injuries occur in football. The Principal Objective of this NIH Phase II SBIR project is to develop and validate HitAlert , a low cost head impact alert system for monitoring mTBI for widespread use. Brain injury is difficult to see , particularly on the field. What is lacking from the current state-of-the-art clinical techniques is the identification of the impact or series of impacts that triggers the clinical symptoms and changes in brain physiology that are indicative of concussion in the athlete. HitAlert provides the enabling technology that allows users at all playing levels to receive the highest level of care.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 172.42K | Year: 2011

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are a significant problem for athletes, and women in particular. Both surgical and non-surgical treatment options exist, with the ultimate goal of regaining joint stability, knee kinematics, and quadriceps strength compared to the uninjured contralateral limb to allow full return of function and activity level and to prevent additional injury to the cartilage and the meniscus in the knee which might lead to an increased likelihood of osteoarthritis (OA). Published research has demonstrated clinically relevant effects of perturbation of support surface training for both ACL-deficient and ACL-reconstructed populations for improving dynamic knee stability, particularly in females. The clinically available methods of delivering the desired perturbations are currently limited to static balance boards that are manually pushed or pulled by the physical therapist. These perturbations may not simulate real-life perturbations that would occur during walking or running. The Principal Objective of this Fast Track SBIR project is to develop and validate a cost-effective commercial product, ActiveStep-Sport , for providing task-specific, neuromuscular, dynamic perturbation training to improve outcomes for both conservative and surgical treatment of ACL injury (ACL), particularly in young athletes and women. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The proposed ActiveStep-Sport system provides the enabling technology for large-scale application of clinicallyrelevant perturbation of support surface training for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury rehablitiation. Approximately 100,000-175,000 ACL reconstructions performed annually in the US annually, with females significantly more likely to suffer an ACL rupture than males. Perturbation training in certain ACL injured populations has been shown to reduce episodes of giving way and to reduce abnormal knee kinematics, both of which often lead to an inability to regain functional levels of sports participationand increase the potential for developing knee osteoarthritis. Use of perturbation training is hypothesized to improve knee kinematics compared to strengthening alone, and to improve outcomes for ACL rehabilitation. The technology developed here represents a translation of validated laboratory-based research methodology to a system more suited for widespread clinical use. If technically and economically feasible, ActiveStep-Sport will help reduce the overall health care costs associated with the treatmentand rehabilitation of ACL injuries and the onset of osteoarthritis.


A new apparatus, system and method for fall prevention training is provided that delivers, studies and analyzes the biomechanics of a disturbance event, such as a slip or trip incident, so that an appropriate response can be executed by the person to reduce or eliminate the number of falls experienced. The apparatus includes a platform that delivers a disturbance event in less than about 500 ms and preferably in the range of about 100 ms to about 200 ms. The method includes a unique protocol for fall prevention training using the apparatus. The disturbance event can create instability in the joint of the individual. An individuals walking gait can be monitored with the portions thereof detected. A disturbance event can be triggered when a given portion of the walking gait is detected. Also, the disturbance even can be triggered manually, at preset intervals or according to preset script.

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