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Daley T.M.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Freifeld B.M.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Ajo-Franklin J.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Dou S.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | And 7 more authors.
Leading Edge | Year: 2013

Distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is a relatively recent development in the use of fiber-optic cable for measurement of ground motion. Discrete fiber-optic sensors, typically using a Bragg diffraction grating, have been in research and development and field testing for more than 15 years with geophysical applications at least 12 years old (Bostick, 2000, and summary in Keul et al., 2005). However, developments in recent years have sought to remove the need for point sensors by using the fiber cable itself as a sensor (Mestayer et al., 2011; Miller et al., 2012). © 2013 © 2013 by The Society of Exploration Geophysicists.


This report studies Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems in Global Market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering  Baker Hughes, Inc.  CGG  Fotech Solutions Ltd.  FutureFibre Technologies Ltd.  Halliburton Company  Lios Technology GmbH  Northrop Grumman Corporation  Omnisens SA  QinetiQ Group plc  Savcor Group Ltd  Schlumberger Limited  Southwest Microwave, Inc  AP Sensing  fibrisTerre GmbH  IFOS, Inc.  Optellios/Senstar  OZ Optics  Pruett Tech, Inc.  SensorNet  Silixa  Tendeka Group  Weatherford International Ltd.  Ziebel Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like  North America  Europe  China  Japan  Southeast Asia  India  Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into  Type I  Type II  Type III  Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems in each application, can be divided into  Application 1  Application 2  Application 3 Global Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Market Research Report 2016  1 Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Market Overview  1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems  1.2 Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Segment by Type  1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems by Type in 2015  1.2.2 Type I  1.2.3 Type II  1.2.4 Type III  1.3 Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Segment by Application  1.3.1 Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015  1.3.2 Application 1  1.3.3 Application 2  1.3.4 Application 3  1.4 Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Market by Region  1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems (2011-2021) 2 Global Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Market Competition by Manufacturers  2.1 Global Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Production and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)  2.2 Global Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Revenue and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)  2.3 Global Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Average Price by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)  2.4 Manufacturers Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area and Product Type  2.5 Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Market Competitive Situation and Trends  2.5.1 Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Market Concentration Rate  2.5.2 Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Market Share of Top 3 and Top 5 Manufacturers  2.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion 3 Global Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Production, Revenue (Value) by Region (2011-2016)  3.1 Global Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Production by Region (2011-2016)  3.2 Global Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Production Market Share by Region (2011-2016)  3.3 Global Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Revenue (Value) and Market Share by Region (2011-2016)  3.4 Global Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.5 North America Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.6 Europe Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.7 China Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.8 Japan Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.9 Southeast Asia Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.10 India Distributed Acoustic Sensing Systems Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) For more information or any query mail at [email protected]


Abbott B.W.,CNRS Ecosystems, Biodiversity, and Evolution Laboratory | Baranov V.,Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries | Mendoza-Lera C.,IRSTEA | Nikolakopoulou M.,Naturalea | And 17 more authors.
Earth-Science Reviews | Year: 2016

Protecting or restoring aquatic ecosystems in the face of growing anthropogenic pressures requires an understanding of hydrological and biogeochemical functioning across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Recent technological and methodological advances have vastly increased the number and diversity of hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological tracers available, providing potentially powerful tools to improve understanding of fundamental problems in ecohydrology, notably: 1. Identifying spatially explicit flowpaths, 2. Quantifying water residence time, and 3. Quantifying and localizing biogeochemical transformation. In this review, we synthesize the history of hydrological and biogeochemical theory, summarize modern tracer methods, and discuss how improved understanding of flowpath, residence time, and biogeochemical transformation can help ecohydrology move beyond description of site-specific heterogeneity. We focus on using multiple tracers with contrasting characteristics (crossing proxies) to infer ecosystem functioning across multiple scales. Specifically, we present how crossed proxies could test recent ecohydrological theory, combining the concepts of hotspots and hot moments with the Damköhler number in what we call the HotDam framework. © 2016 The Authors


Daley T.M.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Miller D.,Silixa | Freifeld B.M.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Dodds K.,BP CCP
76th EAGE Conference and Exhibition 2014, Workshops | Year: 2014

As part of a C02 storage project at Citronelle, Alabama, VSP data was acquired with a short string of tubing-deployed, wall-locking, geophones (18atl5m spacing) and a long (3 km) fiber, also tubing-deployed. We will show data examples comparing geophone and DAS attributes such as spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio and ground motion sensitivity comparison.


Madsen K.N.,Statoil | Dummong S.,Statoil | Kritski A.,Statoil | Pedersen A.S.,Statoil | And 3 more authors.
75th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition 2013 Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2013: Changing Frontiers | Year: 2013

In a collaborative project between Silixa, Weatherford and Statoil, simulatneous multiwell VSP data were successfully acquired using intelligent Distributed Acoustic Sensing (iDAS). The iDAS enables the use of an optic fibre as a massive seismic sensor array. In this field trial the iDAS was retrofitted to existing fibres installed for other purposes. Simultaneous measurements were carried out using 4 iDAS units retrofitted to fibres in three different wells coming up to the same platform. Several seismic lines were shot, e.g. one above each of the well tracks, while listening in the well directly below the shots and also in neighbouring wells at an angle to the shot line. All three wells were producing during the trial and the downhole seismic data were acquired without disturbing the well operations. Consequently data hold information about the flow in the well in addition to the seismic information. Copyright © (2012) by the European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers All rights reserved.


Madsen K.N.,Statoil | Dummong S.,Statoil | Parker T.,Silixa | Finfer D.,Silixa | And 3 more authors.
Borehole Geophysics Workshop II - 3D VSP: Benefits, Challenges and Potential | Year: 2013

Simultaneous multiwell VSP data have been acquired using fibre optic cables in producing wells as distributed acoustic sensors. The measurement apparatus was retrofitted to the fibre optic cables installed for other purpose with completion of the wells. Data were acquired with no other instrumentation in the well and without disturbing the normal operation of the wells.


Madsen K.N.,Statoil | Dummong S.,Statoil | Kritski A.,Statoil | Finfer D.,Silixa | Gillies A.,Silixa
2nd EAGE Workshop on Permanent Reservoir Monitoring: Current and Future Trends | Year: 2013

In a collaborative project between Silixa, Weatherford and Statoil, simulatneous multiwell VSP data were successfully acquired using intelligent Distributed Acoustic Sensing (iDAS). The iDAS enables the use of an optic fibre as a massive seismic sensor array. In this field trial the iDAS was retrofitted to existing fibres installed for other purposes. Simultaneous measurements were carried out using 4 iDAS units retrofitted to fibres in three different wells coming up to the same platform. Several seismic lines were shot, e.g. one above each of the well tracks, while listening in the well directly below the shots and also in neighbouring wells at an angle to the shot line. All three wells were producing during the trial and the downhole seismic data were acquired without disturbing the well operations. Consequently data hold information about the flow in the well in addition to the seismic information.


Sanghvi G.,Total E and P | Le-Roch J.F.,Total E and P | Fernagu J.,Total E and P | Elazabi S.,Total E and P | And 6 more authors.
Society of Petroleum Engineers - Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference, ADIPEC 2015 | Year: 2015

A complex carbonate oil reservoir off the coast of Qatar has been under production since 1997. The field development is based on horizontal oil producers, water injectors and the use of Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESP) as the artificial lift method. A full field 4D seismic data acquisition was undertaken in 2014 to support the future development phases. A Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) acquisition was included in the 4D seismic program to capture a Vertical Seismic Profile and observe the fluid flow dynamics inside the well bore together with the reservoir inflow. The dynamics of gas fraction was imaged through a tuned operating sequence of the well. A digital movie was captured for each location in the wellbore from toe to pump intake. The first of its kind sonic data capture involved a DAS system using fiber optics. Thanks to a permanent fiber optic into the well, the simultaneous captures of DAS system reduce the incremental cost for the DAS information. Gas locking in the ESP is the major cause of down time and reduced ESP run life. The selected well is in an area with limited water drive. The high cost of replacing failed ESPs affects the economic limit of the well and thus reduces the recoverable oil. The applied operational sequence successfully observed intermittent ingestion of gassy fluids into the ESP intake. This provided key information to diagnose the root cause of gas-lock. The incident free operation has clearly imaged (filmed) the fluid dynamics of gas and liquids interacting with the ES pump intake. How detailed the challenges of preparing and conducting this operation were overcome is described. The operational field constraints cover safety, weather constraints, unmanned well platforms, the effects of streamer shooting and simultaneous production operations. On-shore details are described in relation to unusual job planning requirements including logistics and statutory requirements. The results show DAS images that identify the specific gas volumetric fraction of fluids all along the well and entering the pump intake. The acquisition program fully captured the development and movement of large gas bubbles towards the ESP and which subsequently develop into a gas-lock event. The sensing includes images from the drain toe, to ESP intake and onto the well head. The acquired data shows the root causes of operational difficulties particularly during an ESP restart. One can see the actual gas handling performance of the ESP system as the specific gas volume fraction at ESP intake evolves over time. The full sequence of this DAS advanced application has fully captured a gas lock event. This brings key information to improve ESP performance in a gassy environment from the completion design and operating points of view. Copyright 2015, Society of Petroleum Engineers.


Madsen K.N.,Statoil | Thompson M.,Statoil | Parker T.,Silixa | Finfer D.,Silixa
First Break | Year: 2013

Acquiring vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data in a well using conventional wireline technology requires an array of seismic sensors to be lowered down the well to record the seismic signals generated by a shooting vessel on the surface. Due to the expenses involved when interrupting production this is rarely done in producing wells and VSP has not been economically feasible for monitoring purposes. The intelligent Distributed Acoustic Sensing (iDAS) technology enables a fibre-optic cable to be used as a massive acoustic sensor array. Presently, fibre optic cables suitable for iDAS measurements are deployed along many wells for other purposes. The iDAS can be retrofitted to existing optical fibres to acquire densely sampled acoustic measurements at low expense because the normal operation of the well is not disturbed. © 2013 EAGE.


Parker T.R.,Silixa | Shatalin S.V.,Silixa | Farhadiroushan M.,Silixa | Miller D.,Silixa
2nd EAGE Workshop on Permanent Reservoir Monitoring: Current and Future Trends | Year: 2013

Silixa's iDAS distributed acoustic sensor faithfully captures the full acoustic signal at every metre along a length of optical fibre many kilometres long. The iDAS has been used in a range of surface and downhole monitoring applications, including flow measurement, vertical seismic profiling, hydraulic fracture monitoring and surface seismic imaging. The system performance and applications of this technology are rapidly evolving; in this presentation we will be showing some of the more recent results across the PRM application space.

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