Sifco Applied Surface Concepts

Independence, Ohio, United States

Sifco Applied Surface Concepts

Independence, Ohio, United States

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Xiao H.,SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts | Clouser S.,SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts
National Association for Surface Finishing Annual Conference and Trade Show 2010, SUR/FIN 2010 | Year: 2010

Metal matrix composite coatings can improve the surface properties of a material beyond the capability of the substrate, the composite material or the metal alone. The high temperature performance of a cobalt metal - chromium carbide particle composite coating, which can be applied by several methods, provides protection against oxidation and wear. This work investigates the application of a Co-Cr3C2 metal matrix composite by brush plating. The Cr3C2 particles were highly dispersed and suspended in the cobalt sulfate electrolyte through effective agitation. The particles were electrophoretically deposited along with cathodic deposition of cobalt. The distribution of the Cr3C2 particles throughout the composite coating was observed to be uniform by x-ray fluorescence and by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrodeposited composite coating showed improved characteristics including superior hardness and wear resistance. The Co-Cr3C2 coating demonstrated oxidation protection and an increase in hardness upon exposure to temperature up to 815°C. The abrasive wear resistance measured with a Taber abraser also improved after a high temperature exposure. The adhesion of the coating to the substrates was strong in part due to a nickel interlayer used to enhance the bond between the substrate and the coating. The residual stress of the Co-Cr3C2 composite coating on a steel substrate was found to be much smaller than that of a cobalt metal coating. This work demonstrates that brush plating can be used to apply a high performance coating to a select area on a substrate. Copyright © (2010) by the National Association for Surface Finishing.


Vanek D.,Sifco Applied Surface Concepts
Metal Finishing | Year: 2010

Selective plating is a very flexible process, which includes three different processes, including selective (brush) electroplating, selective anodizing, and selective electropolishing and weld cleanup. The plating tools, typically graphite, are wrapped with an absorbent material that both holds and distributes the solutions uniformly over the work area. Solution is supplied to the work area by either dipping the tool into a container, or by pumping it through the tool and recirculating. The plating tool is then moved over the work area. Selective plating equipment includes power packs, preparatory and plating solutions, plating tools, anode covers and auxiliary equipment. The electrolytes used for selective anodizing are available in water-based solutions, or may be in the form of anodizing gels. Selective plating processes are used approximately 50% of the time because they offer a superior alternative to tank finishing processes and 50% of the time because they are better repair methods for worn, mismachined or damaged parts.


Zhong Z.,SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts | Clouser S.J.,SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts
Surface and Coatings Technology | Year: 2014

Hard coating can improve the surface properties of a material beyond the capability of the substrate. For a long time, coatings such as hard nickel, hard chromium, hard alloys and hard composites have been developed for engineering applications due to the improved wear resistance. A newly-developed nickel-tungsten brush plating process has the potential as an alternative of electroplating of hard chromium for engineering application.The nickel-tungsten solution is based on the ammoniacal citrate bath, which can be conveniently brush plated just as brush plating of other metals or alloys. On the other side, hard chromium cannot be brush plated due to the exposure of hazardous hexavalent chromium exceeding the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) limits.The nickel-tungsten alloy coating has been developed for engineering application. It is of nanocrystalline structure (~. 2. nm crystallite size) and demonstrates excellent hardness and wear resistance. The coating is 60% nickel, 40% tungsten by weight. Due to high tungsten content in the alloy, it is thermally stable. Moderately elevated temperatures (200-500. °C) do not cause grain size growth and softening as the case of most other hard coatings (such as hard chromium, nickel phosphorus). Actually, the nickel-tungsten alloy coating can be further hardened by exposure to high temperature of 200-500. °C for a short period of time. Beyond the hardness and wear properties, the coating has been further characterized by XRD, electronic and optical microscopy, hydrogen embrittlement, salt spray corrosion, tribology, axial fatigue, and other testing. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Xiao H.,SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts | Clouser S.,SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts
Plating and Surface Finishing | Year: 2010

Metal matrix composite coatings can improve the surface properties of a material beyond the capability of the substrate, the composite material or the metal alone. The high temperature performance of a cobalt metal - chromium carbide particle composite coating, which can be applied by several methods, provides protection against oxidation and wear. This work investigates the application of a Co-Cr 3C 3 metal matrix composite by brush plating. The Cr 3C 3 particles were highly dispersed and suspended in the cobalt sulfate electrolyte through effective agitation. The particles were electrophoretically deposited along with cathodic deposition of cobalt. The distribution of the Cr 3C 3 particles throughout the composite coating was observed to be uniform by x-ray fluorescence and by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrodeposited composite coating showed improved characteristics including superior hardness and wear resistance. The Co-Cr 3 C 3 coating demonstrated oxidation protection and an increase in hardness upon exposure to temperatures up to 815°C. The abrasive wear resistance measured with a Taber abraser also improved after a high temperature exposure. The adhesion of the coating to the substrates was strong in part due to a nickel inter- layer used to enhance the bond between the substrate and the coating. The residual stress of the Co-Cr 3C 3 composite coating on a steel substrate was found to be much smaller than that of a cobalt metal coating. This work demonstrates that brush plating can be used to apply a high performance coating to a select area on a substrate.


Burfield R.D.,Sifco Applied Surface Concepts | Saleker R.,Sifco Applied Surface Concepts
Metal Finishing | Year: 2011

Plastics molders, operating both captive and job shops, are frequently plagued with downtime due to repairs that must be made on damaged or worn mold components. Typical repairs include damaged cavities, worn gate areas, and parting lines that cause flashing of molded parts. If a mold has a lot of corrosion, scratches and other small surface flaws that result in a poor finish on the molded part, the temptation may be to remove the tooling and send it out for tank electroplating. However, selective plating can take care of these flaws in place, without extensive masking, and is significantly faster than tank electroplating. As wear occurs and pin and bushing dimensions deviate from accepted tolerances, it becomes necessary to discard and replace core pins and core bushings. With the accurately controlled selective plating process, these parts can be quickly plated back to size and put in service, often without finish machining.


Zhong Z.,SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts | Clouser S.,SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts | Vanek D.,SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts
National Association for Surface Finishing Annual Conference and Trade Show, SUR/FIN 2013 | Year: 2013

SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts has developed a brush plated deposit, Tin-Zinc, Code 4019, that provides sacrificial corrosion protection without the use of toxic chemicals. The deposit is 80% tin, 20% zinc by weight. Neutral salt spray tests on the brush plated deposit have shown basis metal protection up to 500 hours with a 0.5 mil (12 micron) coating. When combined with the appropriate conversion coatings (trivalent chromium, or chromium free), the formation white zincate corrosion products is prevented for 96 hours of salt spray. SIFCO's Tin-Zinc, Code 4019 will meet the ASTM 519 requirement without a post-plating HE relief bake •When the deposition is carried out at >50°C Or •At room temperature when a neutral nickel preplate is used. SIFCO's Tin-Zinc is a viable cadmium replacement candidate. Copyright © (2013) by the National Association for Surface Finishing.


Xiao H.,SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts | Clouser S.,SIFCO Applied Surface Concepts
Corrosion Management | Year: 2011

Metal matrix composites were deposited onto the surface of titanium alloys by selective brush plating. The adhesion of the composites to the titanium alloys is good due to a unique surface preparation applied by brush plating. The metal matrix deposits examined include chromium carbide in a cobalt metal matrix also applied by a unique brush plating process. Data showing the improvement in surface properties due to the composite coating is presented.

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