Zheleznogorsk, Russia

Siberian State Aerospace University

www.sibsau.ru
Zheleznogorsk, Russia

Siberian State Aerospace University , previously known as Reshetnyov University or SibSAU , is a university in Krasnoyarsk, Russian Federation. Founded in 1960. Wikipedia.

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News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Vieremä, Finland, 2017-05-26 10:08 CEST (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Distinguished forestry experts were rewarded in Vieremä, Finland. Maintaining the life's work of Einari Vidgrén, the Einari Vidgren Foundation gave out EUR 157,700 in recognitions. Einari Awards, the main recognitions given out from the Foundation, were granted to veteran harvesting professionals Ahti Annala of the company Kone Annala Ky, and Jan-Erik Oldenburg of the company Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy. Industrial Counsellor Einari Vidgrén, the founder of Ponsse Plc, established the Einari Vidgrén Foundation in 2005 with the aim of increasing appreciation for the work performed within the field of mechanised wood harvesting. The purpose of the Foundation is to heighten awareness of the entrepreneurship related to wood harvesting and to make the mechanised harvesting sector more interesting as a potential workplace, especially among young people. The Einari Award is granted for meritorious hard work as a forest machine entrepreneur. The criteria for the award emphasise a long-term approach to entrepreneurship and professionalism in this highly challenging industry. The EUR 20 000 main Einari Awards were granted today to Kone Annala Ky owner Ahti Annala and Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy owner Jan-Erik Oldenburg. Ahti Annala, the founder of Kone Annala Ky and recipient of the Einari Award went into the forest machine business in 1980 together with this brother. After 38 years at the helm of his business, Mr. Annala is ready to hand over the business to the next generation. The company’s ownership is about to be transferred to Mr. Annala's sons who will continue his work. Located in Sodankylä, the company employs 14 people who work in four different machine units. Employee turnover at the company has been remarkably low throughout its history. This is due to Ahti Annala's introducing of human resources policies that place a high value on employee skills and expertise. He looks into the future by offering on-the-job training to young people, and seeks to keep everyone employed in spite of seasonal changes in demand for forestry services. A number of machines guarantees there is always a tool available that is suitable for the task ahead, and the machines are kept in good working condition. This also ensures workplace well-being for the employees. Throughout his years as an entrepreneur, Mr .Annala has relied on honest work and has focused on long-term goals to keep his business steady. Jan-Erik Oldenburg, founder of Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy and recipient of the Einari Award started his business in 1994, felling trees with a chainsaw. He bought his first harvester, a used model, in 2005 after a storm in Sweden blew down entire forests. Located in the Helsinki Capital Region, Puistometsäpalvelu serves private landowners, construction companies and the government-owned company Altia Plc whose forests the company manages with a holistic vision towards sustainability. The company's business model clearly differs from those of traditional machine businesses working for forest companies. Instead of relying on long-term forestry contracts, the company keeps looking for opportunities in various countries. Individual jobs—even small ones—are welcome, and customers can expect to receive all services they need from the same business, such as when clearing a site for a single new house when the company not only fells the trees but transports them for further processing. Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy represents a new and different type of forest felling entrepreneurship with a focus on expertise and excellent service. The Foundation gave Einari Recognitions to research and development organisations active in the field of mechanised wood harvesting, developers of training in the sector and parties that promote awareness of the sector and increase its appreciation. Education in the field of forestry is of utmost importance for the prosperity and continued success of the industry, and will ensure availability of a future workforce. The following awards were granted an Einari Award of EUR 3,000 based on a long-term focus on development and high quality education: Jouko Karjalainen, Director, Oulu Vocational College/Taivalkoski unit Juha Heikkinen, Supervisor, Oulu Vocational College/Muhos unit Markku Kekkonen, Lecturer, Savo Consortium for Education, Toivala unit The Rural Professions Association has been granted an Einari Award of EUR 3,000. The association's aim is to promote the availability of jobs in forestry and agriculture to young people as well as to increase the awareness and networking of the field. The Natural Resources Institute Finland has been awarded an Einari Recognition of EUR 6,000 for advancing cut-to-length felling techniques and related education and training in Canada, especially in the province of Ontario. The City of Jyväskylä has been awarded an Einari Recognition of EUR 2,000 for its Kunnontyöt 2 Project designed to bring jobs to unemployed long-term job seekers, immigrants and marginalized youth.  The project offers apprenticeships to nine students who are expected to graduate with a degree in forestry this spring. An Einari Recognition of EUR 5,000 was granted to German Forestry Ladies Forwarder Cup, for developing forest machine operator training for women in Germany and promoting the forestry especially among women. Two Einari Recognitions of EUR 6,000 each were granted to the following educational institutions for promoting the cut-to-length method: Polo Educativo Technológico Paysandú, Uruguay Reshetnev Siberian State Aerospace University, Russia Two Einari Recognitions of EUR 3,000 were granted to people and organisations in the United States: CTL Manager/Forester Matthew Mattioda of Oregon was recognised for his continued efforts to promote the cut-to-length method, and Finlandia University was given a student grant of EUR 3,000 to facilitate a course on the cut-to-length method and promoting such techniques. The Einari Vidgrén Foundation also gave Einari Operator's Awards of EUR 1,500 each, to a record number of 39 distinguished forest machine operators. The award criteria included the high quality of work and customer-centric attitude as well as cooperation and communication with forest owners and other stakeholders. The Einari Vidgrén Foundation also granted student scholarships of EUR 600 to 27 students studying programmes related to the forest machine sector. The scholarships were decided on by the teaching staff of each college. In addition to success in studies, the criteria included the fact that the student has a job as a forest machine operator or serviceman when leaving school. The material is freely available to the press.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Vieremä, Finland, 2017-05-26 10:08 CEST (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Distinguished forestry experts were rewarded in Vieremä, Finland. Maintaining the life's work of Einari Vidgrén, the Einari Vidgren Foundation gave out EUR 157,700 in recognitions. Einari Awards, the main recognitions given out from the Foundation, were granted to veteran harvesting professionals Ahti Annala of the company Kone Annala Ky, and Jan-Erik Oldenburg of the company Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy. Industrial Counsellor Einari Vidgrén, the founder of Ponsse Plc, established the Einari Vidgrén Foundation in 2005 with the aim of increasing appreciation for the work performed within the field of mechanised wood harvesting. The purpose of the Foundation is to heighten awareness of the entrepreneurship related to wood harvesting and to make the mechanised harvesting sector more interesting as a potential workplace, especially among young people. The Einari Award is granted for meritorious hard work as a forest machine entrepreneur. The criteria for the award emphasise a long-term approach to entrepreneurship and professionalism in this highly challenging industry. The EUR 20 000 main Einari Awards were granted today to Kone Annala Ky owner Ahti Annala and Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy owner Jan-Erik Oldenburg. Ahti Annala, the founder of Kone Annala Ky and recipient of the Einari Award went into the forest machine business in 1980 together with this brother. After 38 years at the helm of his business, Mr. Annala is ready to hand over the business to the next generation. The company’s ownership is about to be transferred to Mr. Annala's sons who will continue his work. Located in Sodankylä, the company employs 14 people who work in four different machine units. Employee turnover at the company has been remarkably low throughout its history. This is due to Ahti Annala's introducing of human resources policies that place a high value on employee skills and expertise. He looks into the future by offering on-the-job training to young people, and seeks to keep everyone employed in spite of seasonal changes in demand for forestry services. A number of machines guarantees there is always a tool available that is suitable for the task ahead, and the machines are kept in good working condition. This also ensures workplace well-being for the employees. Throughout his years as an entrepreneur, Mr .Annala has relied on honest work and has focused on long-term goals to keep his business steady. Jan-Erik Oldenburg, founder of Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy and recipient of the Einari Award started his business in 1994, felling trees with a chainsaw. He bought his first harvester, a used model, in 2005 after a storm in Sweden blew down entire forests. Located in the Helsinki Capital Region, Puistometsäpalvelu serves private landowners, construction companies and the government-owned company Altia Plc whose forests the company manages with a holistic vision towards sustainability. The company's business model clearly differs from those of traditional machine businesses working for forest companies. Instead of relying on long-term forestry contracts, the company keeps looking for opportunities in various countries. Individual jobs—even small ones—are welcome, and customers can expect to receive all services they need from the same business, such as when clearing a site for a single new house when the company not only fells the trees but transports them for further processing. Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy represents a new and different type of forest felling entrepreneurship with a focus on expertise and excellent service. The Foundation gave Einari Recognitions to research and development organisations active in the field of mechanised wood harvesting, developers of training in the sector and parties that promote awareness of the sector and increase its appreciation. Education in the field of forestry is of utmost importance for the prosperity and continued success of the industry, and will ensure availability of a future workforce. The following awards were granted an Einari Award of EUR 3,000 based on a long-term focus on development and high quality education: Jouko Karjalainen, Director, Oulu Vocational College/Taivalkoski unit Juha Heikkinen, Supervisor, Oulu Vocational College/Muhos unit Markku Kekkonen, Lecturer, Savo Consortium for Education, Toivala unit The Rural Professions Association has been granted an Einari Award of EUR 3,000. The association's aim is to promote the availability of jobs in forestry and agriculture to young people as well as to increase the awareness and networking of the field. The Natural Resources Institute Finland has been awarded an Einari Recognition of EUR 6,000 for advancing cut-to-length felling techniques and related education and training in Canada, especially in the province of Ontario. The City of Jyväskylä has been awarded an Einari Recognition of EUR 2,000 for its Kunnontyöt 2 Project designed to bring jobs to unemployed long-term job seekers, immigrants and marginalized youth.  The project offers apprenticeships to nine students who are expected to graduate with a degree in forestry this spring. An Einari Recognition of EUR 5,000 was granted to German Forestry Ladies Forwarder Cup, for developing forest machine operator training for women in Germany and promoting the forestry especially among women. Two Einari Recognitions of EUR 6,000 each were granted to the following educational institutions for promoting the cut-to-length method: Polo Educativo Technológico Paysandú, Uruguay Reshetnev Siberian State Aerospace University, Russia Two Einari Recognitions of EUR 3,000 were granted to people and organisations in the United States: CTL Manager/Forester Matthew Mattioda of Oregon was recognised for his continued efforts to promote the cut-to-length method, and Finlandia University was given a student grant of EUR 3,000 to facilitate a course on the cut-to-length method and promoting such techniques. The Einari Vidgrén Foundation also gave Einari Operator's Awards of EUR 1,500 each, to a record number of 39 distinguished forest machine operators. The award criteria included the high quality of work and customer-centric attitude as well as cooperation and communication with forest owners and other stakeholders. The Einari Vidgrén Foundation also granted student scholarships of EUR 600 to 27 students studying programmes related to the forest machine sector. The scholarships were decided on by the teaching staff of each college. In addition to success in studies, the criteria included the fact that the student has a job as a forest machine operator or serviceman when leaving school. The material is freely available to the press.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Vieremä, Finland, 2017-05-26 10:08 CEST (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Distinguished forestry experts were rewarded in Vieremä, Finland. Maintaining the life's work of Einari Vidgrén, the Einari Vidgren Foundation gave out EUR 157,700 in recognitions. Einari Awards, the main recognitions given out from the Foundation, were granted to veteran harvesting professionals Ahti Annala of the company Kone Annala Ky, and Jan-Erik Oldenburg of the company Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy. Industrial Counsellor Einari Vidgrén, the founder of Ponsse Plc, established the Einari Vidgrén Foundation in 2005 with the aim of increasing appreciation for the work performed within the field of mechanised wood harvesting. The purpose of the Foundation is to heighten awareness of the entrepreneurship related to wood harvesting and to make the mechanised harvesting sector more interesting as a potential workplace, especially among young people. The Einari Award is granted for meritorious hard work as a forest machine entrepreneur. The criteria for the award emphasise a long-term approach to entrepreneurship and professionalism in this highly challenging industry. The EUR 20 000 main Einari Awards were granted today to Kone Annala Ky owner Ahti Annala and Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy owner Jan-Erik Oldenburg. Ahti Annala, the founder of Kone Annala Ky and recipient of the Einari Award went into the forest machine business in 1980 together with this brother. After 38 years at the helm of his business, Mr. Annala is ready to hand over the business to the next generation. The company’s ownership is about to be transferred to Mr. Annala's sons who will continue his work. Located in Sodankylä, the company employs 14 people who work in four different machine units. Employee turnover at the company has been remarkably low throughout its history. This is due to Ahti Annala's introducing of human resources policies that place a high value on employee skills and expertise. He looks into the future by offering on-the-job training to young people, and seeks to keep everyone employed in spite of seasonal changes in demand for forestry services. A number of machines guarantees there is always a tool available that is suitable for the task ahead, and the machines are kept in good working condition. This also ensures workplace well-being for the employees. Throughout his years as an entrepreneur, Mr .Annala has relied on honest work and has focused on long-term goals to keep his business steady. Jan-Erik Oldenburg, founder of Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy and recipient of the Einari Award started his business in 1994, felling trees with a chainsaw. He bought his first harvester, a used model, in 2005 after a storm in Sweden blew down entire forests. Located in the Helsinki Capital Region, Puistometsäpalvelu serves private landowners, construction companies and the government-owned company Altia Plc whose forests the company manages with a holistic vision towards sustainability. The company's business model clearly differs from those of traditional machine businesses working for forest companies. Instead of relying on long-term forestry contracts, the company keeps looking for opportunities in various countries. Individual jobs—even small ones—are welcome, and customers can expect to receive all services they need from the same business, such as when clearing a site for a single new house when the company not only fells the trees but transports them for further processing. Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy represents a new and different type of forest felling entrepreneurship with a focus on expertise and excellent service. The Foundation gave Einari Recognitions to research and development organisations active in the field of mechanised wood harvesting, developers of training in the sector and parties that promote awareness of the sector and increase its appreciation. Education in the field of forestry is of utmost importance for the prosperity and continued success of the industry, and will ensure availability of a future workforce. The following awards were granted an Einari Award of EUR 3,000 based on a long-term focus on development and high quality education: Jouko Karjalainen, Director, Oulu Vocational College/Taivalkoski unit Juha Heikkinen, Supervisor, Oulu Vocational College/Muhos unit Markku Kekkonen, Lecturer, Savo Consortium for Education, Toivala unit The Rural Professions Association has been granted an Einari Award of EUR 3,000. The association's aim is to promote the availability of jobs in forestry and agriculture to young people as well as to increase the awareness and networking of the field. The Natural Resources Institute Finland has been awarded an Einari Recognition of EUR 6,000 for advancing cut-to-length felling techniques and related education and training in Canada, especially in the province of Ontario. The City of Jyväskylä has been awarded an Einari Recognition of EUR 2,000 for its Kunnontyöt 2 Project designed to bring jobs to unemployed long-term job seekers, immigrants and marginalized youth.  The project offers apprenticeships to nine students who are expected to graduate with a degree in forestry this spring. An Einari Recognition of EUR 5,000 was granted to German Forestry Ladies Forwarder Cup, for developing forest machine operator training for women in Germany and promoting the forestry especially among women. Two Einari Recognitions of EUR 6,000 each were granted to the following educational institutions for promoting the cut-to-length method: Polo Educativo Technológico Paysandú, Uruguay Reshetnev Siberian State Aerospace University, Russia Two Einari Recognitions of EUR 3,000 were granted to people and organisations in the United States: CTL Manager/Forester Matthew Mattioda of Oregon was recognised for his continued efforts to promote the cut-to-length method, and Finlandia University was given a student grant of EUR 3,000 to facilitate a course on the cut-to-length method and promoting such techniques. The Einari Vidgrén Foundation also gave Einari Operator's Awards of EUR 1,500 each, to a record number of 39 distinguished forest machine operators. The award criteria included the high quality of work and customer-centric attitude as well as cooperation and communication with forest owners and other stakeholders. The Einari Vidgrén Foundation also granted student scholarships of EUR 600 to 27 students studying programmes related to the forest machine sector. The scholarships were decided on by the teaching staff of each college. In addition to success in studies, the criteria included the fact that the student has a job as a forest machine operator or serviceman when leaving school. The material is freely available to the press.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Vieremä, Finland, 2017-05-26 10:08 CEST (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Distinguished forestry experts were rewarded in Vieremä, Finland. Maintaining the life's work of Einari Vidgrén, the Einari Vidgren Foundation gave out EUR 157,700 in recognitions. Einari Awards, the main recognitions given out from the Foundation, were granted to veteran harvesting professionals Ahti Annala of the company Kone Annala Ky, and Jan-Erik Oldenburg of the company Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy. Industrial Counsellor Einari Vidgrén, the founder of Ponsse Plc, established the Einari Vidgrén Foundation in 2005 with the aim of increasing appreciation for the work performed within the field of mechanised wood harvesting. The purpose of the Foundation is to heighten awareness of the entrepreneurship related to wood harvesting and to make the mechanised harvesting sector more interesting as a potential workplace, especially among young people. The Einari Award is granted for meritorious hard work as a forest machine entrepreneur. The criteria for the award emphasise a long-term approach to entrepreneurship and professionalism in this highly challenging industry. The EUR 20 000 main Einari Awards were granted today to Kone Annala Ky owner Ahti Annala and Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy owner Jan-Erik Oldenburg. Ahti Annala, the founder of Kone Annala Ky and recipient of the Einari Award went into the forest machine business in 1980 together with this brother. After 38 years at the helm of his business, Mr. Annala is ready to hand over the business to the next generation. The company’s ownership is about to be transferred to Mr. Annala's sons who will continue his work. Located in Sodankylä, the company employs 14 people who work in four different machine units. Employee turnover at the company has been remarkably low throughout its history. This is due to Ahti Annala's introducing of human resources policies that place a high value on employee skills and expertise. He looks into the future by offering on-the-job training to young people, and seeks to keep everyone employed in spite of seasonal changes in demand for forestry services. A number of machines guarantees there is always a tool available that is suitable for the task ahead, and the machines are kept in good working condition. This also ensures workplace well-being for the employees. Throughout his years as an entrepreneur, Mr .Annala has relied on honest work and has focused on long-term goals to keep his business steady. Jan-Erik Oldenburg, founder of Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy and recipient of the Einari Award started his business in 1994, felling trees with a chainsaw. He bought his first harvester, a used model, in 2005 after a storm in Sweden blew down entire forests. Located in the Helsinki Capital Region, Puistometsäpalvelu serves private landowners, construction companies and the government-owned company Altia Plc whose forests the company manages with a holistic vision towards sustainability. The company's business model clearly differs from those of traditional machine businesses working for forest companies. Instead of relying on long-term forestry contracts, the company keeps looking for opportunities in various countries. Individual jobs—even small ones—are welcome, and customers can expect to receive all services they need from the same business, such as when clearing a site for a single new house when the company not only fells the trees but transports them for further processing. Puistometsäpalvelu Oldenburg Oy represents a new and different type of forest felling entrepreneurship with a focus on expertise and excellent service. The Foundation gave Einari Recognitions to research and development organisations active in the field of mechanised wood harvesting, developers of training in the sector and parties that promote awareness of the sector and increase its appreciation. Education in the field of forestry is of utmost importance for the prosperity and continued success of the industry, and will ensure availability of a future workforce. The following awards were granted an Einari Award of EUR 3,000 based on a long-term focus on development and high quality education: Jouko Karjalainen, Director, Oulu Vocational College/Taivalkoski unit Juha Heikkinen, Supervisor, Oulu Vocational College/Muhos unit Markku Kekkonen, Lecturer, Savo Consortium for Education, Toivala unit The Rural Professions Association has been granted an Einari Award of EUR 3,000. The association's aim is to promote the availability of jobs in forestry and agriculture to young people as well as to increase the awareness and networking of the field. The Natural Resources Institute Finland has been awarded an Einari Recognition of EUR 6,000 for advancing cut-to-length felling techniques and related education and training in Canada, especially in the province of Ontario. The City of Jyväskylä has been awarded an Einari Recognition of EUR 2,000 for its Kunnontyöt 2 Project designed to bring jobs to unemployed long-term job seekers, immigrants and marginalized youth.  The project offers apprenticeships to nine students who are expected to graduate with a degree in forestry this spring. An Einari Recognition of EUR 5,000 was granted to German Forestry Ladies Forwarder Cup, for developing forest machine operator training for women in Germany and promoting the forestry especially among women. Two Einari Recognitions of EUR 6,000 each were granted to the following educational institutions for promoting the cut-to-length method: Polo Educativo Technológico Paysandú, Uruguay Reshetnev Siberian State Aerospace University, Russia Two Einari Recognitions of EUR 3,000 were granted to people and organisations in the United States: CTL Manager/Forester Matthew Mattioda of Oregon was recognised for his continued efforts to promote the cut-to-length method, and Finlandia University was given a student grant of EUR 3,000 to facilitate a course on the cut-to-length method and promoting such techniques. The Einari Vidgrén Foundation also gave Einari Operator's Awards of EUR 1,500 each, to a record number of 39 distinguished forest machine operators. The award criteria included the high quality of work and customer-centric attitude as well as cooperation and communication with forest owners and other stakeholders. The Einari Vidgrén Foundation also granted student scholarships of EUR 600 to 27 students studying programmes related to the forest machine sector. The scholarships were decided on by the teaching staff of each college. In addition to success in studies, the criteria included the fact that the student has a job as a forest machine operator or serviceman when leaving school. The material is freely available to the press.


Bulgakov E.N.,Siberian State Aerospace University | Maksimov D.N.,RAS Kirensky Institute of Physics
Optics Letters | Year: 2016

We consider light propagation above the light line in arrays of spherical dielectric nanoparticles. It is demonstrated numerically that quasi-bound leaky modes of the array can propagate both stationary waves and light pulses to a distance of 60 wavelengths at the frequencies close to the bound states in the radiation continuum. A semi-analytical estimate for decay rates of the guided waves is found to match the numerical data to a good accuracy. © 2016 Optical Society of America.


Belyaev B.A.,Siberian State Aerospace University | Tyurnev V.V.,RAS Kirensky Institute of Physics | Shabanov V.F.,RAS Kirensky Institute of Physics
Optics Letters | Year: 2014

An easy method for designing filters with equalized passband ripples of a given magnitude is proposed. The filter, which is made of two dielectric materials, comprises coupled half-wavelength resonators and multilayer mirrors. The filter design begins with the synthesis of the multimaterial filter prototype whose mirrors consist of quarter-wavelength layers. Optimal refractive indices of the layers in the prototype are obtained by a special optimization based on universal rules. The thicknesses of the mirrors' layers in the final filter are computed using derived formulas. A design procedure example for silicon-air bandpass filters with a fractional bandwidth of 1% is described. © 2014 Optical Society of America.


Bulgakov E.,Siberian State Aerospace University | Sadreev A.,RAS Kirensky Institute of Physics
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2011

We consider light transmission in a T-shaped photonic waveguide coupled with two identical symmetrically positioned nonlinear microcavities. We present two types of symmetry breaking. The first one is a result of mixing of the symmetric input wave with antisymmetric bound states in the Fabry-Pérot interferometer architecture. Similarly, the second mechanism of the symmetry breaking is the result of mixing the symmetrical input wave with the antibonding bound state in a straight waveguide coupled with two cavities positioned perpendicular to the waveguide. In both cases the mixing is due to nonlinearity. In turn, the symmetry-breaking solutions give rise to nonsymmetrical outputs in the T-shape waveguide. These effects are directly demonstrated by the electromagnetic field solutions which are complimented by coupled mode theory for the light transmission. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Bulgakov E.,Siberian State Aerospace University | Pichugin K.,RAS Kirensky Institute of Physics | Sadreev A.,RAS Kirensky Institute of Physics
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2011

We consider light transmission in a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal waveguide coupled with two identical nonlinear defects positioned symmetrically aside the waveguide. With the coupled mode theory, we show three scenarios for the transmission. The first one inherits the linear case and preserves the symmetry. In the second scenario, the symmetry is broken because of different light intensities at the defects. In the third scenario, the intensities at the defects are equal but phases of complex amplitudes are different. That results in a vortical power flow between the defects similar to the dc Josephson effect if the input power over the waveguide is applied and the defects are coupled. All of these phenomena agree well with computations based on an expansion of the electromagnetic field into optimally adapted photonic Wannier functions in a 2D photonic crystal. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Bulgakov E.N.,Siberian State Aerospace University | Sadreev A.F.,Russian Academy of Sciences
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2010

We consider a Fabry-Perot resonator (FPR) comprised of two off-channel nonlinear defects coupled to the photonic waveguide. For the linear case FPR can support bound states in the form of standing waves between the defects if a distance between them is quantized. For the nonlinear case the bound states appear for arbitrary distance between the defects if electromagnetic intensity is quantized. For transmission through the FPR we reveal additional resonances which are the result of coupling of incident wave with the bound states because of nonlinearity of the defects. The resonances are spaced at the eigenfrequencies of bound states with a width proportional to the input amplitude. The theory of the FPR based on the simple Wang and Fan model is complemented by the tight-binding one. The results for the transmission and bound states in these models agree with computations in real two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide coupled with two off-channel defects fabricated from a Kerr-type material. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Sopov E.,Siberian State Aerospace University
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2015

There exists a great variety of evolutionary algorithms (EAs) that represent different search strategies for many classes of optimization problems. Real-world problems may combine several optimization features that are not known beforehand, thus there is no information about what EA to choose and which EA settings to apply. This study presents a novel metaheuristic for designing a multi-strategy genetic algorithm (GA) based on a hybrid of the island model, cooperative and competitive coevolution schemes. The approach controls interactions of GAs and leads to the self-configuring solving of problems with a priori unknown structure. Two examples of implementations of the approach for multi-objective and non-stationary optimization are discussed. The results of numerical experiments for benchmark problems from CEC competitions are presented. The proposed approach has demonstrated efficiency comparable with other well-studied techniques. And it does not require the participation of the human-expert, because it operates in an automated, selfconfiguring way. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.

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