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Any material or article (ex.: food packaging) intended to come into contact either directly or indirectly with foodstuffs must be sufficiently stable not to transfer substances to the foodstuffs in quantities which could endanger human health or bring about an unacceptable change in the composition of the foodstuffs or a deterioration in the organoleptic characteristics thereof (Council Directive 76/893/EEC). Article 17 of Regulation (EC) N. 178/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council requires food business operators to verify that foods satisfy the relevant requirements of food law. Only substances which are included in the 'Community list' of authorised substances may be used in components of packaging. Appropriate documentation to demonstrate that the materials and articles and the components intended for the manufacturing of those materials and articles comply with the requirements of the European law shall be made available by the business operator to the national competent authorities on request. Unfortunately human exposure to packaging materials and/or their components occurs from migration into foods. In this paper, expected problems are discussed, leading to the conclusion that it will be difficult to achieve comprehensive analysis down to the concentrations presently considered safe, but that systematic work should start to define the possibilities and limitations of analytical chemistry for a migrate-oriented legislation. There is a need for information on identity/quantity of chemicals leaching into food, human exposure, and long-term impact on health.


Zicari G.,Consulente Servizio Sanitario | Soardo V.,SIAN | Cerrato E.,Tecnico della Prevenzione | Panata M.,Tecnico della Prevenzione
Progress in Nutrition | Year: 2012

Many elements occur naturally in low concentrations and may be essential for plant growth such as copper, zinc, iron or manganese. The high concentration of metals in edible mushrooms collected in nature is a source of chronic poisoning known for some time. Thus, the mushrooms may promote the spread of hazardous metals such as cadmium, lead and mercury from the environment in animal and human food chain. The use of manure, as a substrate for growth of cultivated mushrooms may promote the accumulation of these elements. The use of plant protection products (pesticides) for mushroom cultivation also contributes to the distribution of metals such as arsenic, copper, mercury, zinc and iron. This article summarizes the results of some scientific papers about possible chemical hazards from the consumption of mushrooms to be cultivated and spontaneous growth.


Russo M.,Tecnico della Prevenzione | Soardo V.,SIAN
Progress in Nutrition | Year: 2011

The nickel is a naturally occurring element that may exist in various mineral forms in water, soil and foods. It is micro-nourishing at low concentration (μg/day) but large doses may be toxic when taken orally. Also inhalation exposure in occupational setting will cause toxic effect. Nickel- induced contact dermatitis is well documented for humans. In this article it is summarized the toxicity profile of the nickel.


Zicari G.,Consulente Servizio Sanitario | Soardo V.,SIAN | Cerrato E.,ASL Asti | Panata M.,ASL Asti
Progress in Nutrition | Year: 2012

Today are cultivated more than 20 species of fungi, including Agaricus bisporus, using different types of matrices, including at least 200 types of waste. Agaricus bisporus is the most widely cultivated mushroom in the world and it is the species that requires a more complex substrates for growth. The mushroom Agaricus bisporus as provide a low energy intake and macronutrient, maybe considered a source of minerals and the consumption per capita per annum in someareas of the world, reaching 10 kg. The entire production cycle of Agaricus bisporus, from the preparation of the compost to the harvesting, takes about 10-12 weeks and includes the use for the growth substrate of chicken and/or horse manure. This article summarizes the stages of the cultivation of Agaricus bisporus, nutritional value and some possible health risks.

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