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Nagasaki-shi, Japan

Shimizu Y.,Nagasaki University | Shimizu Y.,Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute | Yoshimine H.,Inoue Hospital | Nagayoshi M.,Nagasaki University | And 5 more authors.
Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine | Year: 2016

Objectives: A positive association between white blood cell count and carotid atherosclerosis has been reported. Our previous study also found an inverse association between height and carotid atherosclerosis in overweight but not non-overweight men. However, no studies have reported on the association between high white blood cell (WBC) count and height accounting for body mass index (BMI) status. Methods: We conducted a hospital-based general population cross-sectional study of 3016 Japanese men aged 30–59 years undergoing general health check-ups between April 2013 and March 2014. High WBC count was defined as the highest tertiles of WBC count among total subjects. Results: Independent of classical cardiovascular risk factors, height was found to be inversely associated with high WBC count, especially for subjects with a BMI ≥ 23 kg/m2. The classical cardiovascular risk factors adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of high WBC count for an increment of one standard deviation (SD) in height (5.7 cm) were 0.91 (0.83–0.99) for total subjects, 1.00 (0.86–1.15) for subjects with a BMI < 23 kg/m2 and 0.86 (0.77–0.96) for subjects with a BMI ≥ 23 kg/m2. Conclusion: Independent of classical cardiovascular risk factors, height was found to be inversely associated with high WBC count, especially for those with a BMI ≥ 23 kg/m2. Compared to high stature, short stature appears to convey an inflammatory disadvantage among Japanese men, especially those with a BMI ≥ 23 kg/m2. © 2016 The Japanese Society for Hygiene Source


Yamazaki T.,University of Tokyo | Mori M.,University of Tokyo | Arai S.,University of Tokyo | Tateishi R.,University of Tokyo | And 22 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the fifth most common cancer type and the third highest cause of cancer death worldwide, develops in different types of liver injuries, and is mostly associated with cirrhosis. However, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease often causes HCC with less fibrosis, and the number of patients with this disease is rapidly increasing. The high mortality rate and the pathological complexity of liver diseases and HCC require blood biomarkers that accurately reflect the state of liver damage and presence of HCC. Methods and Findings: Here we demonstrate that a circulating protein, apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) may meet this requirement. A large-scale analysis of healthy individuals across a wide age range revealed a mean blood AIM of 4.99±1.8 μg/ml in men and 6.06±2.1 μg/ml in women. AIM levels were significantly augmented in the younger generation (20s-40s), particularly in women. Interestingly, AIM levels were markedly higher in patients with advanced liver damage, regardless of disease type, and correlated significantly with multiple parameters representing liver function. In mice, AIM levels increased in response to carbon tetrachloride, confirming that the high AIM observed in humans is the result of liver damage. In addition, carbon tetrachloride caused comparable states of liver damage in AIM-deficient and wild-type mice, indicating no influence of AIM levels on liver injury progression. Intriguingly, certain combinations of AIM indexes normalized to liver marker score significantly distinguished HCC patients from non-HCC patients and thus could be applicable for HCC diagnosis. Conclusion: AIM potently reveals both liver damage and HCC. Thus, our results may provide the basis for novel diagnostic strategies for this widespread and fatal disease. © 2014 Yamazaki et al. Source


Shimizu Y.,Nagasaki University | Yoshimine H.,Inoue Hospital | Nagayoshi M.,Nagasaki University | Kadota K.,Nagasaki University | And 4 more authors.
Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine | Year: 2016

Objectives: Several studies have reported the association between sleep apnea syndrome and insulin resistance. Being overweight is known risk factor both for sleep apnea syndrome and insulin resistance. However, no studies have reported on the association between serum triglyceride levels in relation to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG-HDL) ratios (a marker of insulin resistance) and sleep apnea syndrome accounting for body mass index (BMI) status. Methods: Subjects for the present cross-sectional study consisted of 1,528 men aged 30–69 years undergoing pulse oximetry at a sleep disorders clinic for sleep apnea syndrome. Sleep apnea syndrome was diagnosed as a 3 % oxygen desaturation index (ODI) of ≥15 events/h. Results: Among study participants, 241 men were diagnosed with sleep apnea syndrome. Independent of classical cardiovascular risk factors, TG-HDL was significantly positively associated with sleep apnea syndrome in participants with a BMI <25 kg/m2, but not in participants with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2. The multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) of sleep apnea syndrome per Log TG-HDL was 2.03 (95 % CI: 1.36–3.03) for a BMI <25 kg/m2 and 1.23 (95 % CI: 0.89–1.70) for a BMI ≥25 kg/m2. Conclusions: An independent positive association between TG-HDL levels and risk of sleep apnea syndrome was observed in participants with a BMI of <25 kg/m2, but not in participants with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2. TG-HDL levels could be an efficient tool to estimate the risk of sleep apnea syndrome in non-overweight Japanese men. © 2016 The Japanese Society for Hygiene Source

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