Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Whitehouse Station, United States

Zhang M.-L.,Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography | Zhang M.-L.,CAS Institute of Botany | Wen Z.-B.,Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography | Hao X.-L.,Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography | And 3 more authors.
Biochemical Systematics and Ecology | Year: 2015

Plants of Central Asia have played a significant role in the origin of floras of Eurasia and the Northern Hemisphere. Chesneya, a small leguminous genus occurring in Central Asia, western Asia, and Tibet, is used to establish phylogenetic relationships and discuss the evolutionary and biogeographical history based on sequence data of ITS and trnS-trnG and rbcL. We employed BEAST Bayesian inference for dating, and S-DIVA, Lagrange and BBM for ancestral area reconstruction. Our results indicate that Chesniella should be a separate genus, while Spongiocarpella should be included in Chesneya. A classification system within Chesneya comprising five sections is presented. The diversification of Chesneya (crown age ca. 16.56 Ma) is speculated to have been associated with Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) uplift. The following aridification process resulted in the Pliocene diversification of four sections of Chesneya during 4.8-2.06 Ma. Ancestral area reconstruction indicates the Himalayas is the ancestral area of Chesneya and Chesniella, but within Central Asia, the western lowlands, can be inferred as the cradle of most dispersals. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Hawkins K.K.,Brigham Young University | Allen P.,Brigham Young University | Meyer S.,Shrub science Laboratory
Plant Protection Science | Year: 2013

Bromus tectorum is a highly invasive annual grass. The fungal pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda can kill a large fraction of B. tectorum seeds. Outcomes in this pathosystem are often determined by the speed of seed germination. In this paper we extend previous efforts to describe the pathosystem by characterising secondary dormancy acquisition of B. tectorum. In the laboratory approximately 80% of seeds incubated at -1.0 MPa became dormant. In the field, seeds were placed in the seed bank in late autumn, retrieved monthly and dormancy status determined. The field study confirmed the laboratory results; ungerminated seeds became increasingly dormant. Our data suggest that secondary dormancy is much more likely to occur at xeric sites. Source


Richardson B.A.,Shrub science Laboratory | Shaw N.L.,Aquatic science Laboratory | Pendleton R.L.,Forestry science Laboratory
USDA Forest Service - General Technical Report RMRS-GTR | Year: 2012

Recent research and species distribution modeling predict large changes in the distributions of species and vegetation types in the western interior of the United States in response to climate change. This volume reviews existing climate models that predict species and vegetation changes in the western United States, and it synthesizes knowledge about climate change impacts on the native fauna and flora of grasslands, shrublands and deserts of the interior American West. Species' responses will depend not only on their physiological tolerances but also on their phenology, establishment properties, biotic interactions, and capacity to evolve and migrate. The volume is divided into eight chapters that cover the topics of carbon mitigation and adaptation. Current and likely responses of species and habitats to climate change are examined in relation to taxonomic group and ecoregion and with regard to other disturbances. The volume ends with a review of management decision support needs and tools for assessing vulnerability of natural resources and conserving and restoring ecosystems that are or may be impacted by climate change. © Larry Jones. Source


Meyer S.E.,Shrub science Laboratory
USDA Forest Service - General Technical Report RMRS-GTR | Year: 2012

Recent research and species distribution modeling predict large changes in the distributions of species and vegetation types in the western interior of the United States in response to climate change. This volume reviews existing climate models that predict species and vegetation changes in the western United States, and it synthesizes knowledge about climate change impacts on the native fauna and flora of grasslands, shrublands and deserts of the interior American West. Species' responses will depend not only on their physiological tolerances but also on their phenology, establishment properties, biotic interactions, and capacity to evolve and migrate. The volume is divided into eight chapters that cover the topics of carbon mitigation and adaptation. Current and likely responses of species and habitats to climate change are examined in relation to taxonomic group and ecoregion and with regard to other disturbances. The volume ends with a review of management decision support needs and tools for assessing vulnerability of natural resources and conserving and restoring ecosystems that are or may be impacted by climate change. © Larry Jones. Source


Friggens M.M.,Forestry science Laboratory | Warwell M.V.,Forestry science Laboratory | Chambers J.C.,Great Basin | Kitchen S.G.,Shrub science Laboratory
USDA Forest Service - General Technical Report RMRS-GTR | Year: 2012

Recent research and species distribution modeling predict large changes in the distributions of species and vegetation types in the western interior of the United States in response to climate change. This volume reviews existing climate models that predict species and vegetation changes in the western United States, and it synthesizes knowledge about climate change impacts on the native fauna and flora of grasslands, shrublands and deserts of the interior American West. Species' responses will depend not only on their physiological tolerances but also on their phenology, establishment properties, biotic interactions, and capacity to evolve and migrate. The volume is divided into eight chapters that cover the topics of carbon mitigation and adaptation. Current and likely responses of species and habitats to climate change are examined in relation to taxonomic group and ecoregion and with regard to other disturbances. The volume ends with a review of management decision support needs and tools for assessing vulnerability of natural resources and conserving and restoring ecosystems that are or may be impacted by climate change. © Larry Jones. Source

Discover hidden collaborations