Shizuoka-shi, Japan
Shizuoka-shi, Japan

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Mochizuki K.,University of Shizuoka | Mochizuki K.,Yamanashi University | Miyauchi R.,University of Shizuoka | Hariya N.,Yamanashi University | And 4 more authors.
European Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2013

Purpose: Elevated circulating activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), a marker for liver injury, and the lifestyle of a higher rate of eating in healthy and preclinical subjects are associated with increased risk of obesity and diabetes. In this study, we examined the associations between self-reported rate of eating and circulating ALT activity in middle-aged apparently healthy Japanese men. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 3,929 apparently healthy men aged 40-59 years (mean ± SD age, 49.2 ± 5.8 years; BMI, 23.5 ± 2.8 kg/m2) who participated in health checkups in Japan. We analyzed their clinical serum parameters and lifestyle factors, including self-reported rate of eating. Associations between self-reported rate of eating and liver injury markers [ALT, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GTP), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST)], other clinical parameters or lifestyle factors were determined using analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. Multivariate logistic regression analyses (MLRA) were performed with ALT activity as the dependent variable and independent variables that included self-reported rate of eating. Results: MLRA showed that ALT activity showed trends for higher self-reported rate of eating after adjustment for age, energy intake, and smoking status. The association between ALT activity and self-reported rate of eating disappeared after adjustment for BMI. Conclusion: The results of this study show that ALT activity is positively associated with self-reported rate of eating in middle-aged apparently healthy Japanese men. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Mochizuki K.,University of Shizuoka | Mochizuki K.,Yamanashi University | Inoue S.,University of Shizuoka | Miyauchi R.,University of Shizuoka | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology | Year: 2013

Increased levels of circulating soluble type of E-selectin (sE-selectin), neutrophil counts and blood pressure are associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In this study, we conducted a cross-sectional study of men who participated in health check-ups, and selected those who were not diagnosed with or being treated for metabolic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and lipid abnormality according to the health check-ups. We measured their basic clinical parameters including blood pressure and neutrophil count, plasma sE-selectin concentration and lifestyle factors, and assessed their interrelations by multivariate linear regression (MLR) analysis. A total of 351 subjects aged 47.5±8.41 (range, 30-64) y were recruited. Significantly correlated with sE-selectin concentration were neutrophil count, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) (Pearson's correlation coefficient, 0.194, 0.220 and 0.175, respectively). MLR analysis showed that sE-selectin concentration was independently positively related with DBP and neutrophil count, whereas neutrophil count was positively associated with sE-selectin concentration but not DBP. DBP, but not SBP, was independently positively correlated with sE-selectin concentration but not neutrophil count. These results indicate that circulating sE-selectin concentration may be a biomarker for indicating subsequent development of metabolic diseases, in particular CVD, from a healthy state.


Oe Y.,University of Shizuoka | Mochizuki K.,University of Shizuoka | Mochizuki K.,Yamanashi University | Miyauchi R.,University of Shizuoka | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology | Year: 2015

Inflammation has been suggested to play an important role in age-related chronic diseases and disability, and it is associated with nutritional status including obesity and malnutrition. While numerous studies have examined the validity of inflammatory markers in the population studies in Caucasian elderly people, very little information is available for the factors affecting inflammatory markers in Asian elderly people. Among inflammatory markers frequently used for the studies of aging, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is produced mainly by macrophages, and contributes to production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), thus directing a chronic inflammatory process in the body. In the present study, we examined the associations between plasma TNF-α level and several factors related to nutrition status, including BMI, albumin, and energy intake in community-dwelling Japanese elderly. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 390 men and women aged 70-86 y (average 73.5 y), who participated in health check-ups. Associations between plasma TNF-α levels, other clinical parameters, and lifestyle factors were analyzed using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. In elderly men, plasma TNF-α level was positively associated with age, white blood cell count, monocyte count, plasma CRP level, serum creatinine, ureic acid, and triacylglycerol levels, and negatively associated with albumin/globulin ratio, eGFR, and serum HDL-cholesterol level. In elderly women, plasma TNF-α level was positively associated with age, plasma CRP level, and serum triacylglycerol level, and negatively associated with serum albumin and HDL-cholesterol levels. The results of this study suggest that plasma TNF-α is associated with inflammation and insulin resistance in both Japanese elderly men and women, and a prominent association of TNF-α with malnutrition status was observed in elderly women. © 2015, Center for Academic Publications Japan. All rights reserved.


Mochizuki K.,Yamanashi University | Mochizuki K.,University of Shizuoka | Yamada M.,University of Shizuoka | Miyauchi R.,University of Shizuoka | And 5 more authors.
European Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2014

Purpose: Faster eating is positively associated with body mass index in apparently healthy Japanese populations. In the present study, we examined the associations between self-reported rate of eating and visceral and subcutaneous fat areas in apparently healthy middle-aged Japanese men. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of men who participated in health checkups in Japan. We removed participants who were diagnosed with metabolic diseases by the time of their health checkups. A total of 320 subjects aged 30-64 years (mean ± standard deviation, 47.4 ± 8.6 years) were selected. We compared the associations between rate of eating and various clinical parameters including visceral and subcutaneous fat areas, using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), which was adjusted by age and lifestyle factors such as alcohol intake, energy intake, smoking, and physical activity. Multivariate logistic regression analyses (MLRA) were performed with visceral fat area (cm2) as the dependent variable and independent variables that included self-reported rate of eating. Results: Tukey's multiple test following ANCOVA showed that self-reported rate of eating was positively associated with visceral fat area (cm2), but not with subcutaneous fat area (cm2). MLRA showed that the odds ratio of rate of eating for visceral fat area in tertile (T) 3 (>100 cm2) compared with T1 (≤70 cm2) was 1.99 (95 % CI 1.40-2.90, P < 0.01), and the association remained after adjustment for the subcutaneous fat area. Conclusions: The present results show that self-reported faster eating is positively associated with visceral fat accumulation, independently of subcutaneous fat accumulation, in apparently healthy Japanese men. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.


Sunto A.,University of Shizuoka | Mochizuki K.,University of Shizuoka | Miyauchi R.,University of Shizuoka | Misaki Y.,University of Shizuoka | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology | Year: 2013

The relationship between γ-glutamyltransferase (γ-GTP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) has not been established, particularly in the lean or non-overweight population. In the present study, we examined the associations between γ-GTP and CRP in non-overweight and overweight middle-aged Japanese men. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 4,271 apparently healthy men aged 40 to 64 y (mean±SD, 50.5±6.6 y) who participated in health checkups. Associations between serum CRP levels, other clinical parameters, and lifestyle factors were analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analysis and multiple linear regression analysis in the non-overweight (body mass index [BMI]<25 kg/m2) and overweight (BMI≥25 kg/m2) men. Associations between serum γ-GTP activity and serum CRP levels were analyzed using analysis of covariance by comparisons of serum CRP levels of four subgroups according to γ-GTP status. In non-overweight men, BMI, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, fasting blood glucose, aspartate aminotransferase, γ-GTP, and smoking habit were positively associated with serum CRP levels. In overweight men, BMI, diastolic blood pressure, triacylglycerols, and γ-GTP were positively associated with serum CRP levels. After adjustment for age, BMI, smoking status, and alcohol intake, dose-response relationships were observed between γ-GTP and CRP levels in both overweight and non-overweight men. The results of this study indicate that an increase in serum γ-GTP activity is closely associated with elevated CRP levels in both non-overweight and overweight middle-aged Japanese men.


Shirai Y.,University of Shizuoka | Kuriki K.,University of Shizuoka | Endoh K.,University of Shizuoka | Miyauchi R.,University of Shizuoka | And 3 more authors.
Alcohol | Year: 2016

The relationship between drinking frequency and amount of alcohol consumption (i.e., drinking habits) and the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. We aimed to clarify either a linear or J-shaped dose-response relationship between drinking habits and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) as a biomarker for identifying individuals at high risk of CKD. In a large-scale cross-sectional study, 403 men and 121 women with an eGFR of 30-60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 were defined as cases, and 1209 men and 363 women with ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2 were randomly extracted as controls (one case subject was matched with three control subjects, matched according to age and season of data collection). We calculated multivariate-adjusted CKD risk and the corresponding mean eGFR according to drinking habits. In men, negative and positive linear relationships with drinking habits were found for CKD risk and mean eGFR (p < 0.001 for all linear terms), respectively, but there were no corresponding J-shaped relationships (not significant for all quadratic terms). In regard to the mean eGFR, however, positive linear relationships were only shown in men in the highest eGFR quartile (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01 for drinking frequency and amount of alcohol consumption, respectively). In women, no association was found. Regarding each drinking habit, we found a positive linear dose-response relationship to eGFR in middle-aged men with an eGFR ≥30 mL/min/1.73 m2. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


Endoh K.,University of Shizuoka | Kuriki K.,University of Shizuoka | Kasezawa N.,Shizuoka Health Promotion Center | Tohyama K.,Shizuoka Health Promotion Center | Goda T.,University of Shizuoka
Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between psychological stress (PS) and drinking status in relation to diet among middle-aged Japanese men and women in a large-scale cross-sectional study. The study population included 5,587 middleaged Japanese men and 2,718 middle-aged Japanese women who underwent annual health checkups. The subjects were divided into 2 groups (non-drinkers and drinkers) and classified as having low, moderate, or high self-reported PS levels. Energy-adjusted food and nutrient consumption was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Using a general linear model, food and nutrient consumption was estimated for each self-reported PS level in the 2 groups (non-drinkers and drinkers) and the interactions between self-reported PS levels and drinking status were calculated. In men, pork and beef; squid, octopus, shrimp, and clams; eggs; mushrooms; Japanese-style sweets; ice cream; bread; Chinese noodles; coffee; and soda as foods and protein, animal protein, fat, animal fat, carbohydrate, monounsaturated fatty acid, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA, cholesterol, vitamin D, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, niacin, pantothenic acid, magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc as nutrients significantly interacted with self-reported PS levels and drinking status (p for interaction <0.05 for all). No specific interactions were found in women. These findings suggest interactions between PS levels and drinking status with consumption of some foods and nutrients, especially macronutrient intake, in men but not in women. © 2015, Center for Academic Publications Japan. All rights reserved.


Endoh K.,University of Shizuoka | Kuriki K.,University of Shizuoka | Kasezawa N.,Shizuoka Health Promotion Center | Tohyama K.,Shizuoka Health Promotion Center | Goda T.,University of Shizuoka
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2015

Background: In Japan, in comparison with the rest of the world the death rate of lung cancer is low although the smoking rate is relatively high. This is the so-called "Japanese smoking paradox". A healthy diet is proposed to attenuate the risk without quitting smoking. We here examined the relationships between smoking status (SS) and the consumption of food and nutrient in Japan. Materials and Methods: Totals of 5,587 men and 2,718 women were divided into three (non-smokers, smokers and heavy smokers) and two (non-smokers and smokers) groups, respectively, according to pack-year, which represents the amount of smoking over a long period. Food and nutrient consumption was estimated with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Using general linear models, food and nutrient consumption was estimated for each group in men and women, separately. Results: In men, SS was positively related to consumption of rice, 3 alcoholic beverages, carbohydrate, alcohol and other 8 foods/nutrients (p < 0.05 for all) and negatively to those of protein animal, fat, fatty acids, dietary fiber, isoflavones and 36 other foods/nutrients (p < 0.05 for all). In women, SS was positively associated with intake of 13 foods/nutrients, while being negatively associated with those of rice, energy, dietary fiber, and 14 other foods/nutrients (p < 0.05 for all). Conclusions: Our results support lower intake of vegetables and fruits rich in antioxidants, which are thought as preventive factors for many diseases, in smokers.


Mochizuki K.,University of Shizuoka | Miyauchi R.,University of Shizuoka | Misaki Y.,University of Shizuoka | Kasezawa N.,Shizuoka Health Promotion Center | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology | Year: 2012

Increased leukocyte counts, particularly white blood cell and neutrophil counts, are reportedly associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and mortality in subjects with acute and moderate coronary diseases. However, few reports have determined the associations between leukocyte subset (i.e., white blood cells, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils) counts and CVD risk factors. In this study, we examined the associations between leukocyte subset counts and CVD risk factors in apparently healthy Japanese men. We conducted a cross-sectional study of men who participated in health checkups, and selected those who were not being treated for metabolic diseases. We determined associations between leukocyte subset counts and CVD risk factors by multivariate linear regression (MLR) analysis and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Overall, 3,576 subjects aged 49.3±5.75 (range, 40-59) y were recruited. MLR and ANCOVA showed that white blood cell, neutrophil, monocyte counts are associated with decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and increased C-reactive protein levels, the lymphocyte count is positively associated with lipid abnormalities (i.e., decreased HDL-C, increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and increased triacylglycerol (TG)), and the basophil count is associated with increased TG and liver injury marker levels (i.e., alanine aminotransferase). Our results in this study demonstrated that leukocyte subset counts showed differential associations with CVD risk factors in apparently healthy Japanese men.


PubMed | University of Shizuoka and Shizuoka Health Promotion Center
Type: | Journal: Alcohol (Fayetteville, N.Y.) | Year: 2016

The relationship between drinking frequency and amount of alcohol consumption (i.e., drinking habits) and the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. We aimed to clarify either a linear or J-shaped dose-response relationship between drinking habits and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) as a biomarker for identifying individuals at high risk of CKD. In a large-scale cross-sectional study, 403 men and 121 women with an eGFR of 30-60mL/min per 1.73m(2) were defined as cases, and 1209 men and 363 women with 60mL/min/1.73m(2) were randomly extracted as controls (one case subject was matched with three control subjects, matched according to age and season of data collection). We calculated multivariate-adjusted CKD risk and the corresponding mean eGFR according to drinking habits. In men, negative and positive linear relationships with drinking habits were found for CKD risk and mean eGFR (p<0.001 for all linear terms), respectively, but there were no corresponding J-shaped relationships (not significant for all quadratic terms). In regard to the mean eGFR, however, positive linear relationships were only shown in men in the highest eGFR quartile (p<0.05 and p<0.01 for drinking frequency and amount of alcohol consumption, respectively). In women, no association was found. Regarding each drinking habit, we found a positive linear dose-response relationship to eGFR in middle-aged men with an eGFR 30mL/min/1.73m(2).

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