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Makuuchi R.,Shizuoka Cancer CenterShizuoka | Makuuchi R.,Keio University | Terashimd M.,Shizuoka Cancer CenterShizuoka | Kusuhara M.,Shizuoka Cancer Center Research Institute | And 6 more authors.
Biomedical Research (Japan) | Year: 2017

The gene mutation and expression profiles of gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) have not been comprehensively determined. Here, we examined the gene mutation and expression profiles of NEC using whole exome sequencing (WES) and microarray analysis. Six patients with gastric NEC and 13 with gastric adenocarcinoma (GAD) were included in this study. Single nucleotide variants were compared and multivariate statistical investigation with orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was performed to compare the difference in expression profiles between NEC and GAD. NEC showed a significantly higher mutation rate than GAD and the percentage difference in the mutation pattern of NEC compared with GAD was 92.8%. OPLSDA clearly discriminated between NEC and GAD. We identified 35 genes, including CPLX2 (Complexin 2), which were expressed more strongly in NEC than in GAD, of which 14 were neural- related. Immunohistochemical analysis showed the strong expression of CPLX2 in all NECs, versus expression in only 2 of 13 GADs. Gastric NEC had a specific mutation pattern with a significantly higher gene mutation rate than GAD, and completely differed from GAD on the basis of gene expression profile. CPLX2 might be a potential novel biomarker for the diagnosis of NEC. © 2017 Biomedical Research Foundation. All rights reserved.


Yamakawa Y.,Shizuoka Cancer CenterShizuoka | Yamakawa Y.,Keio University | Kusuhara M.,Shizuoka Cancer Center Research InstituteShizuoka | Terashima M.,Shizuoka Cancer CenterShizuoka | And 7 more authors.
Biomedical Research (Japan) | Year: 2017

CD44 variant 9 (CD44v9) and the heavy chain of 4F2 cell-surface antigen (CD98hc) appear important for regulation of reactive oxygen species defence and tumor growth in gastric cancer. This study examined the roles of CD44v9 and CD98hc as markers of gastric cancer recurrence, and investigated associations with energy metabolism. We applied capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry to metabolome profiling of gastric cancer specimens from 103 patients who underwent resection with no residual tumor or microscopic residual tumor, and compared metabolite levels to immunohistochemical staining for CD44v9 and CD98hc. Positive expression rates were 40.7% for CD44v9 and 42.7% for CD98hc. Various tumor characteristics were significantly associated with CD44v9 expression. Five-year recurrence-free survival rate was significantly lower for CD44v9-positive tumors (39.1%) than for CD44v9-negative tumors (73.5%; P < 0.0001), but no significant differences in recurrence-free survival were seen according to CD98hc expression. Uniand multivariate analyses identified positive CD44v9 expression as an independent predictor of poorer recurrence-free survival. Metabolome analysis of 110 metabolites found that levels of glutathione disulfide were significantly lower and reduced glutathione (GSH)/ glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio was significantly higher in CD44v9-positive tumors than in CD44v9-negative tumors, suggesting that CD44v9 may enhance pentose phosphate pathway flux and maintain GSH levels in cancer cells. © 2017 Biomedical Research Foundation. All rights reserved.


Urakami K.,Shizuoka Cancer Center Research InstituteShizuoka | Shimoda Y.,SRL IncTokyo | Ohshima K.,Shizuoka Cancer Center Research InstituteShizuoka | Nagashima T.,SRL IncTokyo | And 10 more authors.
Biomedical Research (Japan) | Year: 2016

Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) of the genomes of cancer cells is contributing to new discoveries that illuminate the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. To this end, the International Cancer Genome Consortium and The Cancer Genome Atlas are investigating novel alterations of genes that will define the pathways and mechanisms of the development and growth of cancers. These efforts contribute to the development of innovative pharmaceuticals as well as to the introduction of genome sequencing as a component of personalized medicine. In particular, chromosomal translocations that fuse coding sequences serve as important pharmaceutical targets and diagnostic markers given their association with tumorigenesis. Although increasing numbers of fusion genes are being discovered using NGS, the methodology used to identify such fusion genes is complicated, expensive, and requires relatively large samples. Here, to address these problems, we describe the design and development of a panel of 491 fusion genes that performed well in the analysis of cultured human cancer cell lines and 600 clinical tumor specimens. © 2016, Biomedical Research Foundation. All right reserved.


Ono A.,Shizuoka Cancer CenterShizuoka | Murakami H.,Shizuoka Cancer CenterShizuoka | Serizawa M.,Shizuoka Cancer Center Research InstituteShizuoka | Wakuda K.,Shizuoka Cancer CenterShizuoka | And 9 more authors.
Lung Cancer | Year: 2016

A 57-year-old male current smoker was diagnosed with an aggressive variant of ALK-rearranged inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) arising in the pleural cavity. First line treatment with ASP3026 was initiated at a dose of 125 mg once daily. A follow-up CT scan revealed drastic regression of the pleural lesion. After disease progression with ASP3026 treatment, LDK378 (ceritinib) was initiated at a dose of 750 mg once daily. A follow-up CT scan revealed a second drastic regression of the pleural lesion. Furthermore, it is noteworthy that this case represents the use of serum hyaluronan levels to assist in monitoring of treatment efficacy in an IMT. Herein, we present the first case of a patient with a highly aggressive ALK-rearranged IMT arising in the pleural cavity, who showed both initial and subsequent drastic response to two ALK inhibitors while being monitored for serum hyaluronan. © 2016 The Author(s)

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