Osaka, Japan
Osaka, Japan

Shitennoji University is a private university in Habikino, Osaka, Japan. The predecessor of the school was founded in 1922, and it was chartered as a junior women's college in 1957. The school became a four-year college in 1967, and it became coeducational in 1981, adopting the present name at the same time. The school is also known as International Buddhist University, or IBU. Wikipedia.

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Matsumoto T.,Shitennoji University | Kimura T.,Kobe University | Hayashi T.,Kyoto University
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine | Year: 2017

Objective: A majority of menstruating women experience some degree of regular recurrences of diverse symptoms-commonly known as premenstrual syndrome (PMS)-during the days before menstruation. Given the multifactorial etiology of PMS, no single treatment is universally recognized as effective, and many women turn to alternative modalities, including aromatherapy. The present study investigated therapeutic effects on premenstrual symptoms using fragrance from yuzu, a Japanese citrus fruit (Citrus junos Sieb. ex Tanaka), and aromatherapy, from the perspective of autonomic nervous system function. Subjects: Seventeen women in their 20s with subjective premenstrual symptoms. Design: A single-blind randomized crossover study. Settings/Location: This study was performed at a laboratory in a university in Osaka, Japan. Subjects were examined on two separate occasions in the luteal phase. Outcome measures: Using two aromatic stimulation sources (yuzu and lavender used as the control), this experiment measured heart rate variability (HRV) reflecting autonomic nerve activity and the Profile of Mood States (POMS) as a psychologic index before and after aromatic stimulation. Results: A scant 10-min inhalation of the yuzu scent significantly decreased heart rate and increased high-frequency power of HRV, reflecting parasympathetic nerve activity, in the luteal phase. Additionally, POMS tests demonstrated that inhalation of the yuzu essential oil significantly decreased three negative subscales: Tension-anxiety, anger-hostility, and fatigue-common premenstrual symptoms, together with a total mood disturbance as a global measure of affective state, as long as 35 min after the aroma stimulation. These premenstrual psychoneurophysiologic effects of yuzu fragrance did not differ from those of the effects of lavender. Conclusions: The present study indicated that short-term inhalation of yuzu fragrance could alleviate premenstrual emotional symptoms, which, at least in part, is attributable to the improvement of parasympathetic nervous system activity. This study further implies that yuzu fragrance aromatherapy might serve as an anti-PMS modality, given its comparable psychoneurophysiologic effects to those of lavender, a representative relaxing scent. © 2017 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Fukazawa T.,Kyoto University of Education | Tant A.,Shitennoji University
Journal of the Japan Research Association for Textile End-Uses | Year: 2017

In the present study, a series of experiments have been performed to discuss changes in temperature evaluation-ability and cutaneous warm and cold sensation thresholds with healthy young, middle-aged, and elderly Japanese males. Fifteen locations in the body have been selected as target locations in the study in order to examine regional difference as well. Local difference was not found to be significant through the ability temperature evaluation test, because the obtained evaluated temperature was almost equal to the given temperature stimulus on the skin surface in each location. In addition, aging effect was not significantly seen in the temperature evaluation test. On the other hand, the results of thermal sensitivity test showed a significant aging effect on both the warm and cold thermal thresholds on the skin surface in each location. The sensitivity to detect warmth or coldness was remarkably greater in the young males than in the middle-aged and elderly males. © 2017 Jpn.Res.Assn.Text.End-Uses.


Kurata Y.,Shitennoji University | Fujimura K.,Hiroshima International University | Kuwana M.,Keio University | Tomiyama Y.,Osaka University | Murata M.,Keio University
International Journal of Hematology | Year: 2011

The epidemiology of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is not well-characterized in the general population. Most published studies, which have included relatively small numbers of ITP patients, have been conducted in England or Scandinavian countries. No epidemiologic data from Asian countries have been published. This study describes the epidemiology of ITP in a Japanese population. We analyzed the database registry of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan, and extracted newly diagnosed acute and chronic ITP patients with a platelet count of <100 × 109/L. From 2004 to 2007, 7,774 cases of ITP were reported, giving an overall incidence of 2.16/100,000/year. The incidence differed greatly between males and females, being 1.72 and 2.58, respectively. The median age of the total affected population was 56 years old. Inmale patients, therewas a striking preponderance of boys below 4 years and a very high peak among those aged 75-89 years. In female patients, the number of ITP patients appeared to show a trimodal distribution by age, with the first peak representing patients below 4 years, the second peak those aged 20-34 years, and the third peak those aged 50-89 years. In conclusion, the incidence of ITP in Japan is not markedly different from that of European countries studied to date. This population-based study reveals that, contrary to previously published studies, the maximum age-specific incidence is in the eighth decade. © The Japanese Society of Hematology 2011.


Yamaguchi T.,Osaka City University | Izumi Y.,Osaka City University | Nakamura Y.,Osaka City University | Nakamura Y.,Izumi Municipal Hospital | And 10 more authors.
International Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2015

Background Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) by repeated treatment of transient limb ischemia is a clinically applicable method for protecting the heart against injury at the time of reperfusion. In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated RIC on cardiac dysfunction after myocardial infarction (MI).Methods and results At 4 weeks after MI, rats were separated into the untreated (UT) group or the RIC-treated group. RIC treatment was performed by 5 cycles of 5 min of bilateral hindlimb ischemia and 5 min of reperfusion once a day for 4 weeks. Despite comparable MI size, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (LVEF) was significantly improved in the RIC group compared with the UT group. Furthermore, the LVEF in the RIC group was improved, although not significantly, after treatment. RIC treatment also prevented the deterioration of LV diastolic function. MI-induced LV interstitial fibrosis in the boundary region and oxidant stress were significantly attenuated by RIC treatment. MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a), a key regulator of tissue fibrosis, was highly expressed in the exosomes and the marginal area of the RIC group. Even in the differentiated C2C12-derived exosomes, miR-29a expression was significantly increased under hypoxic condition. As well as miR-29a, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) was highly expressed both in the exosomes and remote non-infarcted myocardium of the RIC group. IGF-1R expression was also increased in the C2C12-derived exosomes under hypoxic conditions.Conclusions Repeated RIC reduces adverse LV remodeling and oxidative stress by MI. Exosome-mediated intercellular communication may contribute to the beneficial effect of RIC treatment. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.


Nishida S.,Kenseikai Nara Dongo Hospital | Satoh H.,Shitennoji University
Life Sciences | Year: 2013

Aims Modulation of vasodilating actions by quercetin, a kind of flavonoid, was investigated using rat mesenteric arterial ring strips. Main methods Ring strips (1 mm) of rat mesenteric artery were used. The specimens were kept at 36.5 C in Krebs-Henseleit solution oxygenated with 95% O2 and 5% CO2. Key findings Quercetin (0.1 to 100 μM) dilated the contraction induced by norepinephrine (1 μM) in a concentration-dependent manner. The quercetin-induced vasodilatation was almost resistant to both 100 μM L-NG-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and 100 μM indomethacin. At 1 mM tetraethylammonium (a KCa channel inhibitor) decreased the quercetin-induced vasodilatation, which was resistant to L-NAME and indomethacin, but not significantly. L-NAME- and indomethacin-resistant quercetin-induced vasodilatation was significantly attenuated by 100 μM 18α- and 50 μM 18β-glycyrrhetinic acids (gap junction inhibitors). Endothelium removal as well significantly attenuated the vasodilatation to the same extent. Significance These results indicate that quercetin dilates the mesenteric artery via endothelium-dependent mechanisms, and the dilatation is mainly mediated by gap junctions closely involved with endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Matsumoto T.,Shitennoji University | Asakura H.,Center for Advanced Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility | Hayashi T.,Kyoto University
BioPsychoSocial Medicine | Year: 2013

Background: A majority of reproductive-age women experience a constellation of various symptoms in the premenstrual phase, commonly known as premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Despite its prevalence, however, no single treatment is universally recognized as effective, and many women turn to alternative approaches, including aromatherapy, a holistic mind and body treatment. The present study investigated the soothing effects of aromatherapy on premenstrual symptoms using lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), a relaxing essential oil, from the perspective of autonomic nervous system function.Methods: Seventeen women (20.6 ± 0.2 years) with mild to moderate subjective premenstrual symptoms participated in a randomized crossover study. Subjects were examined on two separate occasions (aroma and control trials) in the late-luteal phases. Two kinds of aromatic stimulation (lavender and water as a control) were used. This experiment measured heart rate variability (HRV) reflecting autonomic nerve activity and the Profile of Mood States (POMS) as a psychological index before and after the aromatic stimulation.Results: Only a 10-min inhalation of the lavender scent significantly increased the high frequency (HF) power reflecting parasympathetic nervous system activity in comparison with water (aroma effect: F = 4.50, p = 0.050; time effect: F = 5.59, p = 0.017; aroma x time effect: F = 3.17, p = 0.047). The rate of increase in HF power was greater at 10-15 min (p = 0.051) and 20-25 min (p = 0.023) in the lavender trial than in the control trial with water. In addition, POMS tests revealed that inhalation of the aromatic lavender oil significantly decreased two POMS subscales-depression-dejection (p = 0.045) and confusion (p = 0.049)-common premenstrual symptoms, in the late-luteal phase, as long as 35 min after the aroma stimulation.Conclusions: The present study indicated that lavender aromatherapy as a potential therapeutic modality could alleviate premenstrual emotional symptoms, which, at least in part, is attributable to the improvement of parasympathetic nervous system activity. This study further implies that HRV could evaluate the efficacy of aromatherapy using various fragrances to relieve premenstrual symptoms, and ultimately, support the mind and body health of women. © 2013 Matsumoto et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Matsumoto T.,Shitennoji University | Asakura H.,Center for Advanced Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility | Hayashi T.,Kyoto University
Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology | Year: 2012

The present study investigated whether salivary chromogranin A (CgA), a psychological stress marker associated with sympathetic nervous system activity, changes during the menstrual cycle in women with different degrees of premenstrual psychoemotional symptoms. Forty-five women (28.6±1.3 years) with regular menstrual cycles participated in this study. Salivary CgA and cortisol were measured during the follicular and late-luteal phases. The authors used the Profile of Mood State (POMS) to assess current mood states of subjects in each menstrual phase and divided the subjects into three groups depending on increase of total mood disturbance (TMD), a global measure of affective states of POMS from the follicular to the late-luteal phase: Low (4.1±0.7%), Middle (18.7±1.2%) and High (51.7±7.4%). Results showed no intramenstrual cycle differences in salivary CgA in the Low and Middle groups. Women in the High group, in contrast, had a significantly higher level of salivary CgA in the late-luteal phase compared to that of the follicular phase. Additionally, salivary CgA level significantly and positively correlated with TMD and four emotional subscales: tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, anger-hostility and confusion in the late-luteal phase. No intergroup or menstrual-cycle difference occurred in the salivary cortisol. This study indicates a significant late-luteal increase in salivary CgA, reflecting an increase of sympathetic nerve activity in women who experience a substantial increase (>30%) in a cluster of negative psychoemotional symptoms premenstrually. Furthermore, salivary CgA, as opposed to salivary cortisol, could serve as a reliable noninvasive biomarker to more sensitively evaluate neuropsychophysiological fluctuations during the menstrual cycle. © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.


Matsumoto T.,Shitennoji University | Asakura H.,Center for Advanced Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility | Hayashi T.,Kyoto University
Gynecological Endocrinology | Year: 2013

A majority of women in their reproductive years experience a variety of symptoms premenstrually that can alter behavior and well-being and affect family, friends, and working relationships. Notwithstanding its prevalence, however, research has not yet clarified this inscrutable condition, commonly known as premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or more severe PMS, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). This comprehensive review discusses the diagnosis, epidemiology, symptoms, etiology, and the complex web of biopsychosocial factors that attends PMS. © 2013 Informa UK, Ltd.


Matsumoto T.,Shitennoji University | Asakura H.,Ohgimachi Ladies Clinic | Hayashi T.,Kyoto University
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine | Year: 2014

Objective: This study investigated the soothing effects of fragrance from yuzu, a Japanese citrus fruit (Citrus junos Sieb. ex Tanaka), with salivary chromogranin A (CgA) used as an endocrinologic stress marker reflecting sympathetic nervous system activity. Methods: Twenty healthy women (mean age, 20.5±0.1 years) participated in a randomized, controlled, crossover study. Participants were examined on two separate occasions - once using the yuzu scent and once using unscented water as a control - in the follicular phase. This experiment measured salivary CgA and the Profile of Mood States (POMS) as a psychological index before and after the aromatic stimulation. Results: Ten-minute inhalation of the yuzu scent significantly decreased salivary CgA. At 30 minutes after the inhalation period, the salivary CgA level further decreased. In addition, POMS revealed that inhalation of the aromatic yuzu oil significantly decreased total mood disturbance, a global measure of affective state, as well as four subscores of emotional symptoms (tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, anger-hostility, and confusion), as long as 30 minutes after the olfactory stimulation. Conclusions: Yuzu's aromatic effects may alleviate negative emotional stress, which, at least in part, would contribute to the suppression of sympathetic nervous system activity. © Copyright 2014, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2014.


Satoh H.,Shitennoji University
Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine | Year: 2013

Herbal medicine in Japan is termed as Kampo medicine, which is derived from traditional Chinese medicine. Shakuyakukanzoto (Shao-Yao-Gan-Cao-Tang) as a kind of Kampo formulations is composed of just two components; Paeoniae Radix and Glycyrrhizae Radix, which produced marked relaxation of intestinal tract. Mokuboito (Mu-Fang-Ji-Tang) inhibited cardiac ionic channel currents, and as a mixture also produced great vasodilatation. Sinomenine (a main ingredient of Mokuboito) as a single compound also caused the vasodilatation, but decreased it along with ageing. Gypsum containing in Mokuboito and Chotosan (Diao-Teng-San) caused more marked effects, as compared with those without Gypsum. On the other hand, Rokumigan (Liu-Wei-Wan), Hachimijiogan (Ba-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan) and Goshajinkigan (Niu-Che-Shen-Qi-Wan) increase in order the number of contained ingredients. The formulations with more herbs (ingredients) produced much more effective actions on rat aorta, presumably due to compensation of the decline of pharmacological sensitivity with ageing. Thus, there are some important differences between single chemical drugs and mixture drugs with many ingredients. The effects of Kampo medicine (mixture) are never just a sum of each effect induced by a lot of ingredients. For elder persons, furthermore, Kampo medicine exerts more effective actions. © 2013 Hiroyasu Satoh.

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