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Absalan F.,Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences | Ghannadi A.,Shiraz Human Assisted Reproductive Center | Kazerooni M.,Shiraz Human Assisted Reproductive Center
Journal of Reproduction and Infertility | Year: 2013

Background: The purpose of the study was to compare clinical pregnancy and delivery rates with fresh and frozen embryo transfer in patients admitted to Shiraz-Human Assisted Reproductive Center with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Methods: OHSS patients randomly divided in two groups, group A (n=50) with fresh embryo transfer and group B (n=50) with frozen embryo transfer. We used vitrification method for freezing the embryos. Patient age, combination of female and male factors, total number of retrieved oocytes, number of cryopreserved embryo, number of transferred embryos, clinical pregnancy and delivery rates were recorded for all patients. All statistical calculations were done using SPSS software. Generalized linear model was used to adjust the confounding factors to compare the clinical pregnancy and delivery rates between two groups. The p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Mean (±SD) ages of these patients were 26.78±3.5 and 28.42±4.2 yrs in fresh (A) and frozen (B) embryo transfer groups respectively. Combinations of male and female factors were 28.3% and 32.1% respectively. Average numbers of oocytes retrieved in two groups were 22.14±4.3 and 21.02±4.9, and after fertilization, embryos cryopreserved per patient yielded averages of 13.82±3.5 and 12.5±4.3. Thaw and ET were performed and the means for transferred embryos were 3.22±0.6 and 4.1±0.7. We didn't find any significant differences in implicit parameters between the two groups. The pregnancy and delivery rates in OHSS patients were significantly higher in frozen embryo transfer, 63.1% and 45.6%, compared with fresh embryo transfer, 55.1% and 35.4%, respectively. Conclusion: The pregnancy and delivery rates in OHSS cases, both fresh and subsequently with frozen embryo transfer, were exceptionally high. There was statistically significant difference of pregnancy and delivery rates between fresh and frozen embryo transfer. As a result, an elective embryo freezing policy to moderate the severity and duration of OHSS has compromising outcomes for women at risk of OHSS. Source


Absalan F.,Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences | Absalan F.,Shiraz Human Assisted Reproductive Center | Ghannadi A.,Shiraz Human Assisted Reproductive Center | Ghannadi A.,Islamic Azad University at Larestan | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics | Year: 2012

Objective: To evaluate and compare standard sperm parameters and sperm chromatin integrity by sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCD) in ejaculates from men whose partners have a history of recurrent pregnancy loss and from control group of fertile men. Methods: Thirty couples with unexplained recurrent abortion (case group) and 30 fertile couples (control group) referring to Shiraz infertility center were included. Sperm parameters were assessed in semen samples from two groups and then staining with SCD procedure. The results were analyzed by performing ANOVA and Tukey ,s tests. Results: In control group, nucleoids with big (65.93 ± 2.35), small (12.4 ± 0.60) and without halo (11.6 ± 0.50) showed significant difference with case group (41.40 ± 1.43), (21.16 ± 1.11) and (23.26 ± 1.10) respectively. In the RPL group spermatozoa with high percentage of abnormal parameters (morphology and motility) was observed (p ≥ 0.05). Conclusion: This study strengthens the current literature associating sperm quality with recurrent pregnancy loss, and emphasizes the important of evaluating male factor by tests such as SCD in addition to conventional sperm parameters. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source


Absalan F.,Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences | Ghannadi A.,Shiraz Human Assisted Reproductive Center | Zabihi A.,Shiraz Human Assisted Reproductive Center
International Journal of Fertility and Sterility | Year: 2014

Background: Ketamine, an injectable anesthetic in human and animal medicine, is also a recreational drug used by young adults. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of ketamine on membrane integrity, DNA fragmentation and sperm parameters in humans. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 40 males with normal semen samples over one month (August 2012). Subjects were randomly allocated to four groups (Control and case I, II and III) whose semen samples were adjusted to different concentrations of ketamine (1, 3, 5 μL) for one hour. Sperm analysis was performed for routine parameters, motility and morphology. Evaluation of membrane integrity and DNA fragmentation was done by eosin-Y staining and the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test, respectively. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's tests. P≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Total sperm motility in all case groups were significantly lower compared with the control group. In case group III, progressive motility showed significant difference with case group II. After addition of ketamine, sperm had evidence of coiled tails in all case groups compared to the control group however this observation was not significant. Evaluation of membrane integrity showed the rate of necrospermia increased in all case groups. However, ketamine only significantly affected membrane integrity in case group III. SCD staining showed that in the control group nucleoids with medium halos (63.44 ± 1.2) were significantly different compared to the case groups I (15.44 ± 0.45), II (9.05±1.16) and III (10.55 ± 1.14), respectively. Between case groups, nucleoids with large and medium halos showed significant differences in case groups II and III compared with case group I. Nucleoids with medium halos were significantly different between case groups II and III. Conclusion: Ketamine, through its effect on membrane integrity and DNA fragmentation, decreased sperm viability and caused abnormal sperm parameters in progressive motility. Source

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