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Takano A.,Toyo Shinyaku Co. | Kamiya T.,Toyo Shinyaku Co. | Yamaguchi K.,Toyo Shinyaku Co. | Takagaki K.,Toyo Shinyaku Co. | Sugimura H.,Shinkokai Medical Corporation
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2015

Objectives: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study was conducted to evaluate the effects of powdered black tea containing polydextrose on postprandial serum triglyceride. Methods: The subjects were 90 healthy volunteers whose fasting serum triglyceride levels were from 120 to 199 mg/dL. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups and ingested a fat-rich diet and either a test drink containing 5 g (as dietary fiber) of polydextrose or a placebo drink without polydextrose. Serum triglyceride levels were measured before and at 2, 3,4, and 6 hours after ingestion. Results: The test drink significantly decreased postprandial serum triglyceride levels at 4 hours and area under the curve after the fat-rich diet was ingested, compared to placebo drink (P<0.05). During this study period, no abnormal changes attributed to test drink were observed. Conclusions: These results indicate that powdered black tea containing polydextrose taken with a diet has an inhibitory effect on the postprandial serum triglyceride elevation. Source


Yasutake Y.,Suntory Business Expert Ltd | Hori H.,Suntory Business Expert Ltd | Kitagawa Y.,Suntory Business Expert Ltd | Sugimura H.,Shinkokai Medical Corporation
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2015

Objectives To evaluate the safety of excessive intake of tea containing quercetin glucosides in healthy adults including obese subjects. Study design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Methods Forty-eight healthy adults aged 20-64 years old with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 18.5 and<30.0kg/m2 were randomly assigned into two groups and ingested daily one bottle of the tea containing 0 mg or 330 mg of quercetin glucosides for 4 weeks. Results There were no clinically concerning changes or adverse effects related to the test beverage containing quercetin glucosides in this study. Conclusions These results indicated that the tea containing quercetin glucosides was safe for excessive intake. Source


Tanaka T.,Suntory Wellness Ltd. | Nakamura J.,Suntory Wellness Ltd. | Kitagawa Y.,Suntory Wellness Ltd. | Shibata H.,Suntory Wellness Ltd. | Sugimura H.,Shinkokai Medical Corporation
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2011

Objectives: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted on 90 subjects with high-normal fasting serum triglyceride levels and mild hypertriglyceridemia in order to evaluate the effect of carbonated beverages containing resistant maltodextrin on postprandial serum triglyceride elevation. Methods: The subjects were 90 healthy volunteers (fasting serum triglyceride : 120-200 mg/dL). The subjects were randomly divided into two groups and ingested a high fat meal (42.2 g fat) and either a test beverage containing 5 g (as dietary fiber) of resistant maltodextrin or a placebo beverage without resistant maltodextrin. Serum triglyceride elevation was determined before and 2, 3, 4, and 6 hours after ingestion of the high fat meal. Results: Compared to the placebo beverage, the test beverage significantly lowered the value of postprandial serum triglyceride at 3 and 4 hours after the high fat meal was ingested (p<0.05). In addition, within a subgroup of subjects with fasting serum triglyceride levels 150-200 mg/dL, the value of postprandial serum triglyceride was significantly lowered by the test beverage 4 hours after the high fat meal was ingested when compared with the placebo beverage (p<0.05). Conclusions: These results demonstrated that the carbonated beverage containing resistant maltodextrin taken with a meal has an inhibitory effect on the postprandial serum triglyceride elevation in subjects with high-normal fasting serum triglyceride levels and mild hypertriglyceridemia. Source


Kishimoto Y.,Matsutani Chemical Industry Co. | Tachibe M.,Matsutani Chemical Industry Co. | Kitagawa M.,Matsutani Chemical Industry Co. | Nishibata T.,Matsutani Chemical Industry Co. | And 2 more authors.
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2014

Methods: Fifty four healthy female subjects with constipation tendency were recruited for a randomized and placebo-controlled study. After 2-week observation period (Pre-Period), all subjects received 28 g of placebo biscuits (without HXLS) for 2 weeks (Period I). Following Period I, subjects received placebo, low-dose (3.5 g of dietary fiber from HXLS), or highdose (7 g of dietary fiber from HXLS) biscuits for 2 weeks (Period II). During 6-week test period, subjects were requested to record symptoms such as stool frequency, stool volume.Results: Compared to Pre-Period, no significant effect was observed in low-dose group, whereas high-dose group showed significantly higher frequency of defecation during Period II.Conclusion: The investigation revealed that defecation frequency depends on dietary fiber intake and effective amount of dietary fiber from HXLS is 7 g.Objectives: We investigated the efficacy and dose-dependent effect of highly cross-linked starch (HXLS) from tapioca on defecation. Source


Kamiya T.,Toyo Shinyaku Co. | Yahiro E.,Toyo Shinyaku Co. | Kido Y.,Toyo Shinyaku Co. | Takano A.,Toyo Shinyaku Co. | And 3 more authors.
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2013

Objectives: Pueraria flower extract (PFE) is a crude extract of the Kudzu flower (Pueraria thomsonii). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted to evaluate the safety of an excessive intake of the powdered drink containing PFE. Methods: Twenty nine healthy adults (male=15, female=14) were divided into two groups, one is test group and the other is placebo group. The subjects ingested a test food (7.5 g powdered tea containing PFE) or a placebo food (7.5 g powdered tea without PFE) for 4 weeks, respectively. A blood, urinalysis, and physical tests were performed at weeks 0, 2, 4, and 6. Results: No abnormal changes were noted in blood, urinalysis, endocrine, and the other parameters for any of the both groups. In addition, no treatment-related side effects were observed. Conclusions: These results suggest that the powdered drink containing PFE is safe in the case of excessive intake. Source

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