Sheffield, United Kingdom
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Sheffield Hallam University is a university in South Yorkshire, England, based on two sites in Sheffield. City Campus is located in the city centre, close to Sheffield railway station, and Collegiate Crescent Campus is about two miles away, adjacent to Ecclesall Road in south-west Sheffield.The university is the third largest in the UK, with more than 37,000 students , 4,170 staff and 747 courses. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Sheffield Hallam University | Date: 2015-04-14

An electrically conducting organic-inorganic sol-gel derived coating. Films are generated exhibiting good electrical conductivity with high resistance to substrate delamination. PEDOT:PSS is used as the conducting polymer dispersed within an organic-inorganic hybrid sol-gel.


Patent
Sheffield Hallam University | Date: 2017-02-22

An electrically conducting organic-inorganic sol-gel derived coating. Films are generated exhibiting good electrical conductivity with high resistance to substrate delamination. PEDOT:PSS is used as the conducting polymer dispersed within an organic-inorganic hybrid sol-gel.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: FCT-06-2015 | Award Amount: 5.62M | Year: 2016

Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs) across Europe face today important challenges in how they identify, gather and interpret terrorist generated content online. The Dark Web presents additional challenges due to its inaccessibility and the fact that undetected material can contribute to the advancement of terrorist violence and radicalisation. LEAs also face the challenge of extracting and summarising meaningful and relevant content hidden in huge amounts of online data to inform their resource deployment and investigations. In this context, the main objective of the TENSOR project is to provide a powerful terrorism intelligence platform offering LEAs fast and reliable planning and prevention functionalities for the early detection of terrorist organised activities, radicalisation and recruitment. The platform integrates a set of automated and semi-automated tools for efficient and effective searching, crawling, monitoring and gathering online terrorist-generated content from the Surface and the Dark Web; Internet penetration through intelligent dialogue-empowered bots; Information extraction from multimedia (e.g., video, images, audio) and multilingual content; Content categorisation, filtering and analysis; Real-time relevant content summarisation and visualisation; Creation of automated audit trails; Privacy-by-design and data protection. The project brings together industry, LEAs, legal experts and research institutions. It is expected that this collaboration will have significant impact on 1) ensuring the final system meets end-user LEA requirements, 2) enabling LEAs to access and examine terrorist generated content online bringing significant advantages to their operational capability, and 3) promoting industrys enhanced understanding of operational LEA requirements and their market competitiveness in the field of online organised crime, terrorism and harmful-radicalisation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-16-2015 | Award Amount: 5.57M | Year: 2016

Around 50% of the global population lives in metropolitan areas, and this is expected to grow to 75% by 2050. Mobility within these areas is complex as it involves multiple modalities of transport, multiple managing authorities, as well as several millions of citizens. The cost of inefficiency in transport and mobility are enormous. For example, inefficiency costs the UK economy 5.8 billion each year. 583 million is wasted on fuel (e.g. traffic congestion) alone each year, which attributes to increased urban pollution and CO2. Hold-ups to business or freight vehicles amounts to 1.5bn annually. Mobility generates huge amounts of data thought thousands of sensors, city cameras, and connected cars, as well as millions of citizens connected through their mobile devices. If properly managed, this data can be used to understand, optimise and manage mobility and make it more efficient, sustainable and resilient. SETA will address this challenge, creating a technology and methodology able to use this wealth of data to change the way mobility is organised, monitored and planned in large metropolitan areas. The solution will be able to collect, process, link and fuse high-volume, high-velocity, multi-dimensional, heterogeneous, cross-media, cross-sectorial data and to use it to model mobility with a precision, granularity and dynamicity that is impossible with todays technologies. Such models will be the basis of pervasive services to citizens and business, as well as decision makers to support safe, sustainable, effective, efficient and resilient mobility. The project has the potential to impact the everyday lives of millions of people, their health and the environment with enormous financial and social impact. SETAs solution will be evaluated rigorously by citizens, business and decision makers in 3 cities across Europe. The proposal includes a commercialisation plan and describes the economy of managing the SETA ecosystem in a metropolitan area.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-24-2016 | Award Amount: 1.06M | Year: 2017

State-of-the art Virtual Reality (VR) technologies designed for gaming offer new opportunities for social and economic benefits in their application to education. This project will pioneer the use of mainstream PlayStation VR technologies for innovative educational applications which engage world-wide audiences in the Europes rich historical and scientific heritage. Supported by the R&D team at Sony Interactive Entertainment Europe (SIEE), it will actively inform and map the processes and technologies required for SMEs to successfully bring new gamified VR applications to Sonys online PlayStation Store. The resulting technology and tools will provide an infrastructure for creating educational VR experiences and generate new business opportunities outside of traditional gaming activities on the PlayStation platform. In the process it will create inclusive narrative-driven VR experiences which improve the social and physical accessibility of cultural heritage and contribute to the digital preservation of historical sites.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FCT-14-2014 | Award Amount: 4.54M | Year: 2015

The Unity vision is to strengthen the connection between the police and the diverse communities they serve to maximise the safety and security of all citizens. The end-user focus of Unity shall identify best practices in Community Policing (CP) through primary and secondary research to enhance cooperation between Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs) and citizens through the development and live pilot demonstrations of technological tools in six EU member states that facilitate, strengthen and accelerate community and LEAs communications. These tools shall be amplified and supported by the design and delivery of CP training and awareness raising activities to LEAs, citizens and community partners, including online virtual communities. Unity will provide LEAs with a new CP model and shared framework of governance and enabling tools and technology to support closer cooperation for greater, more effective and efficient and more inclusive CP. The citizen-centred approach of Unity support the combined protection, safety, security and well-being of communities, but it will also support a more collective, shared ownership of large scale, collective risk. Coordinated by pioneers and practitioners in CP, Unity seeks new ways of working in which the police will serve as a catalyst for change within communities, helping the latter to become an integral part of the solution, and thereby sharing the ownership and delivery of a sustainable CP model which simultaneously embraces the benefits of technology while meeting diverse community needs. This new and sustainable citizen-centred CP model will have community trust and confidence at its heart, with the ability for two-way flows of information and communication to allow for greater understanding of the problems and issues faced by communities. By working with citizens and community stakeholders to arrive at a full understanding of their concerns, targeted interventions and solutions can be agreed to keep local communities safe


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FCT-07-2014 | Award Amount: 5.54M | Year: 2015

The aim of AUGGMED is to develop a serious game platform to enable single- and team-based training of end-users with different level of expertise from different organisations responding to terrorist and organised crime threats. The platform will automatically generate non-linear scenarios tailored to suit the needs of individual trainees with learning outcomes that will improve the acquisition of emotional management, analytical thinking, problem solving and decision making skills. The game scenarios will include advanced simulations of operational environments, agents, telecommunications and threats, and will be delivered through VR and MR environments with multimodal interfaces. This will result in highly realistic training scenarios allowing advanced interactivity while encouraging security staff and first responders to engage and actively participate in the training process. In addition, the AUGGMED platform will include tools for trainers enabling them to set learning objectives, define scenarios, monitor training sessions, modify scenarios and provide feedback in real-time, as well as evaluate trainee performance and set training curricula for individual personnel in the post-training session phase. Finally, the platform will be offered in affordable and cost-effective Modes including Basic Mode (low VR fidelity and interactivity through mobile devices), Intermediate Mode (immersive multimodal VR) and Full Mode (immersive multimodal MR On-Site).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 183.45K | Year: 2017

This proposal envisions a humanoid robot as a supervised autonomous assistant that will support caregivers in early diagnosis and improve the treatment of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) associated with Intellectual Disability (ID). The robot can be part of the diagnostic team during the administration of the psycho-diagnostic tests in order to enrich the data that the psychologist can use to refine the diagnosis, helping them to distinguish among the ASD and ID levels. The robot can autonomously carry out routine rehabilitation activities that dont need particular attention by the human therapist, who can, therefore, focus on other subjects that need more care. The robot will always remain under the ultimate control of the caregiver who can use the robots sensors streaming to monitor the child and intervene when needed. The proposal presents a research program that will introduce three main innovations: (i) an unique set of use cases in which a sociall assistive robot gives support to the diagnosis and rehabilitation of ASD and ID; (ii) implementation of novel control strategies for autonomous and safe robot-child interaction that can support the intelligent personalization of activities and overcome problems of the Wizard of Oz (WoZ) approach in practical applications; (iii) An user-centred design of the use cases that facilitates the direct integration of the robot in everyday activities and standard therapeutic protocols. The final output of the research project will be a complete set of use cases that will be empirically validated via pilot studies and small-scale trials in school, family and clinical environments. Furthermore, the proposal enlists a series of actions for the widespread scientific dissemination of the experimental results and outreach activities to give evidence also to the general public of the actual opportunities offered by robot and, thus, increase their acceptance and willingness to use robots in the care of ASD and ID.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 2.25M | Year: 2015

The manufacture of large scale civil nuclear components presents many technical, economic and environmental challenges. To enable the UK to successfully compete in the domestic and global nuclear power plant market this project aims to maximise manufacturing efficiency and minimise environmental impact. This will be achieved by utilising advanced near net forging/forming, hollow ingots, high integrity electron beam welding , net shape cladding and high speed machining to dramatically increase material yield and deliver larger, more complex civil nuclear components that have previously been impossible to manufacture domestically. This project also aims to combine process modelling and advanced material characterisation methods to understand and optimise both the manufacturing route and metallurgical response of the components, thus maximising the resultant mechanical properties and component integrity. Through these technological advancements the cost, lead time and embodied energy of nuclear forgings can be greatly reduced resulting in reductions in energy unit prices and CO2 emissions in generation.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 82.60K | Year: 2017

Since April 2015, the Around the Toilet project has been exploring what makes a safe and accessible toilet space. Through the project we have shown that while toilets are often thought to be a mundane space, for those for whom a lack of adequate or accessible toilet provision is a crucial practical issue on a daily basis, toilets are the big necessity (George, 2011). Arts, Architecture, Activism and Access: Taking Around the Toilet to New Spaces introduces a new leg of the Around the Toilet project. It is made up of three strands, which are directed at communities invested in the project in different ways. Strand A continues our commitment to working within queer and disability arts, but unlike previous work adds a more explicit international dimension. It begins by collaboratively producing a film which which describes journeys taken or not taken due to in/accessible toilets. The film will be screened at queer and disability arts event in Toronto (Canada), Reykjavik (Iceland), as well as within the UK. We will also submit the film to be screened at mainstream film festivals in order to widen our audience. Strand B continues dissemination activity with architects and design professionals. To do this we will work collaboratively with Sheffield School of Architecture and the Live Works Urban Room, to develop and deliver a Studio Pack, Re-Imagining Access, to be used with MA Architecture Students. The Studio Pack will first be used with MA Architecture Students at the University of Sheffield, before being made available to be used at architecture schools across the country. Strand B will also work closely with Gillian Kemp from Public Toilets UK to disseminate and receive feedback on the Toilet Toolkit (www.toilettoolkit.co.uk) which was developed through a previous project, Servicing Utopia. Strand C follows numerous conversations created by the project about the infamous space of the school toilet. Working with Purple Patch Arts and using shadow puppetry, the project team will seek feedback from young people with learning difficulties on the outputs and findings produced through the project so far. This feedback will be curated by an artist to form an exhibition which school professionals will be invited to view and begin a dialogue around what makes a safe, accessible, and indeed pleasant, toilet space in schools.

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